Charles Morice Papers

Collection ID: 
SPC.MSS.LT016
Date: 
1889-1970
Footage: 
9 Boxes
Collecting Area: 

 

Collection Summary

 

Title

Charles Morice Papers

Dates

1889-1970      

Collection ID

SPC.MSS.LT016

Creator

Morice, Charles, 1861-1919

Quantity

9 boxes

Repository

Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries

Language

Materials in English and French.

           

Detailed Collection Information

 

Biographical Note

Charles Morice was a prolific spokesman for the Symbolist movement. He was at times a poet, playwright, shipping clerk, literary critic, professor of literature, and lecturer.

Born in St. Etienne, France, on May 15, 1860, Charles Victor Marius Morice was raised in a Catholic bourgeois family. 1 He studied first in St. Etienne, then in Lyons before studying for his baccalaureate with the Jesuits. A fellow student remembered the distinguished demeanor and the elegant silhouette of the “grand garçon” dressed in black. He did not seem interested in his studies, though, and suddenly left.  2

In 1882 Morice left Lyons, his passionate and impulsive nature drawn by the irresistible appeal of Paris. Here he collaborated on La Nouvelle Rive Gauche, the first number appearing November 9, 1882. A month later the journal published a review of Paul Verlaine entitled “Boileau-Verlaine” and written by “Karl Mohr,” a pseudonym for Morice. This was the beginning of the young writer’s friendship with and advocacy of Paul Verlaine.

La Nouvelle Rive Gauche took the title  Lutèce in 1883, to gain "la rive droite,” said the editor, and thereby conquer all of Paris.  3 Charles Morice worked with Leo Trezenik and Georges Rall to establish the new weekly newspaper. The conquest was short, however;  Lutèce ceased publication three years later.

This fateful year, 1886, also saw the declaration of the principles of Symbolism by Jean Moréas in an article in Figaro. The earliest collaborators of this movement, beside Moréas, were Verlaine, Morice, Maurice Rollinat, Jean Ajalbert, Laurent Tailhade, Paul Adam, Louis Dumur, Rachilde, Léon Cladel, and Willy. Francis Vielé-Griffin, Henri de Régnier, and Ernest Raynaud made their debuts as part of this movement. Most of these men are among Charles Morice’s correspondents in this collection. These illustrious correspondents and optimistic publishing ventures did not, however, bring wealth; between 1884 and 1886, Morice took a job as a shipping clerk and later as a primary school teacher.

Also in 1886, Morice published, with E. Halpérine-Kaminsky, a translation of Dostoievsky’s L’Esprit Souterrain. That year Morice gave  La Revue Contemporaine a study of  Lamartine, Baudelaire and Shelley. He also worked on a book-length study of Verlaine (published in 1888). In 1887, Verlaine wrote to the published Vanier that Morice needed the money promised as soon as possible. Morice deserved the funds as he was “un garçon de très grand avenir.”  4

In 1889, Morice’s La Littérature de Tout à l’Heure appeared. This, his longest and most complete work, was in five parts: 


1.  De is verité et de la beauté
2.  Les formules accomplies
3.  Les influences nouvelles
4.  Les formules nouvelles
5.  Commentaires d’un livre future

In the section on his future work, Morice tells of his “triple synthesis”--synthesis of metaphysical thought, fiction, and expression. Morice wrote of 18th century literature as well as of new influences and styles. Of some writers and critics he wrote well; of others he wrote not at all or harshly.

La Littérature de Tout à l’Heure was greeted with mixed emotions--from joy to contempt. But the identification of truth (verité) and beauty as proclaimed by Morice became the credo of the Symbolists.  5 In a diagram Morice traced the intellectual genealogy of the epoch, beginning with Chateaubriand and Goethe at the base of a triangle and moving upward through Hugo, Balzac, Baudelaire, Poe, Wagner, and Banville to Verlaine and Mallermé. The top of the triangle is not drawn; it is the ideal, the unknown.

La Plume, a Paris literary magazine, published a portrait of Morice in its place of honor in the July 15, 1889 number. During this period Morice collaborated in the founding of  Mercure de France, the “organ of the purest Symbolism.”  6 He attended Stéphene Maliarmé’s “Tuesdays,” weekly social gatherings of Symbolist writers and painters.

Morice met Paul Gauguin in the period after La Littérature de Tout à l’Heure, during the painter’s third stay in Brittany (1889) and before his first departure for Tahiti (April 1891). The writer helped to organize a benefit performance for Gauguin and Verlaine held in 1891. A play Morice had been writing was planned for the benefit and had to be finished hurriedly. The play,  Cherubin, was about the curse of money; it was not well received.

Gauguin returned two years later and the first exhibit of his Tahitian paintings was held in November-December 1893 at the Durand-Ruel gallery. During the winter of 1893 Gauguin wrote the text of a book on his Tahitian sojourn. He left his draft with Morice who was to collaborate on the book with the painter. Gauguin left Paris for Pont Aven, Brittany, in April 1894, apparently believing the manuscript to be nearly complete except for “the few unwritten verses” Morice would add. 7 Morice added a preface, a chapter entitled “Songeries,” as well as the poems. Portions of  Noa Noa(“pleasing fragrance”) appeared for the first time in  La Revue Blanch, between October 15 and November 1, 1897.

Gauguin had been writing his friends William Mollard end Daniel de Monfreid, asking about the fate of his manuscript and illustrations. 8 The first book length edition of  Noa Noa appeared in 1901, without illustrations. This  La Plume edition was largely the same text which had appeared in  La Revue Blanche. Danielson calls the 1901 edition the one coming “closest to Gauguin’s original conception of the book.”  9 In 1910, extracts of this version were published in the magazine  Les Marges. In 1929 the definitive text appeared, prepared by Daniel de Monfreid and published by G. Cres and company, without the poems of Morice or his preface and first chapter.

During this collaboration on Noa Noa Morice married Elisabeth Fourmier de Saint-Maure, widow of Comte Joseph Vien. In 1896 he, his wife Héll and her daughter Gabrielle (known to intimates as Gaby or By) left Paris for Brussels, “chasse par la faim.”  10 In 1897 their son Albert was born. Between 1899 and 1901 Morice taught at the Universite Nouvelle de Bruxelles; among his courses were the history of Flemish painting and a comparative history of the parallel development of the arts. He also gave lectures and published  L’Esprit belge and  Les Artistes belges. During this period he exchanged his ivory tower for an observation post, becoming active in social concerns such as the lepers in Iceland. Morice published a curious pamphlet,  L’Alliance Franco-Russe (1897) which contained several prophetic pages about the 1917 Russian revolution.  11

In 1901, Morice returned to Paris; Le Matin assigned him the regular coverage of the judicial courts. Perhaps one assignment was on the death penalty; in early 1902 Morice received a series of letters discussing capital punishment. Emile Durkheim, professor of sociology at the University of Bordeaux, wrote him as did Charles Richet, professor of medicine at the University of Paris and a future Nobel Prize winner. Morice received a legal opinion from Maxime Kovalevesky, professor of law at the University of Moscow. Eugene Brieux, a dramatist interested in social reform, wrote to protest the death penalty.

In 1905 Mercure de France published a series on “Les Directions actuelles de la Pensée plastique.” Contemporary artists were asked questions on the influences and tendencies on and in the “art of figures.” The questions, replies, and Morice’s introduction appeared in three issues of  Mercure, from August 1 to September 1, 1905.

For a short time in 1908 Morice was secretary to Auguste Rodin. He had published a discerning analysis of the sculptor’s work in 1900 but their artistic temperaments did not blend well and Morice stayed with Rodin for only three months. They collaborated again but this time from a distance. A series of letters between Morice and Max Leclerc of the Librairie Armand Cohn, from July 16, 1910 to September 5, 1911, concerned the former’s progress on the introduction to Rodin’s Les Cathedrals des France (1914). Morice’s lengthy introduction is a scholarly history of church architecture in France.

Morice continued to review the works of other writers, publishing many articles between 1908 and 1911. The collection of his papers includes three notebooks filled with Morice’s clippings of articles and book reviews during these years. His book on Eugene Carriers appeared, in 1906.

In 1911 Morice published a novel, Il est Russuscité, the story of the return of Jesus to Paris during the early 20th century. Although Morice had distanced himself from the Catholic faith of his childhood he had retained a mystic belief in the Absolute. The search for truth and beauty became his ideology. A series of lectures given in Geneva were published in 1893 as  Du Sens Religieux de la Poésie. Morice’s searching continued; he wrote three series of letters to friends which expressed his religious beliefs. The first “Le Retour ou Mes Raisons,” was addressed to Louis Le Cardonnel and was published by Messein in 1913. The second, “L’Amour et la Mort,” was addressed to Maurice Barrès and was published by Messei in the same year as the first. The third “L’Examen de la Conscience,” addressed to Louis Lefebvre, was interrupted by Morice’s death in 1919.  12

The beginning of the first world war changed Morice’s life as his son, Albert (also called Mé), was mobilized and his wife left Paris to accompany their son to Breton for his training. Morice stayed in Paris and gave lectures on the history of French poetry, the relationships between “l’art plastique” (figures) and music, and on Paul Vertaine, Morice suggested that his fellow writers and artists form aLigue de Défense et d’Initiative artistiques, to exert control over patriotic celebrations to insure that these would be in good taste.  13 “Le Grand Atelier,” an elite artistic and literary group, was announced in the  Mercure; they would be the vendor of the productions, working with the artists as well as the amateurs.

Morice continued to organize expositions, conferences and celebrations. He spoke to students as well as the general public. Morice wrote and had several unfinished manuscripts when he died on March 18, 1919.

Notes:

1. Morice was not born in 1861 as is sometimes reported. See Paul Delsemme,  Charles Morice: Un theoricien du Symbolisme (Paris: Librairie Nizet, 1958), p.25. 
2. Delsemme, p.26. 
3. Delsemme, p.29. 
4. Delsemme, p.43. 
5. Delsemme, p.189. 
6. Joanna Richardson,  Verlaine (New York: The Viking Press, 1971), p.284. 
7. Nicholas Wadley, ed.,  Noa Noa: Gauguin’s Tahiti (Oxford: Phaedon, 1985), p.88. 
8. Delsemme, pp.74-76. 
9. Bengt Danieleaon,  Gauguin in the South Seas (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday and Co., Inc., 1966), p.244. 
10. Georges Zayed, ed.  Lettres inédites a Charles Morice (Geneve: Droz, 1964), p. xliii. 
11. Delsemme, p.68. 
12. Louis Lefebvre,  Charles Morice: Une Grande Figure du Symbolisme (Paris: Perrin et Cie., 1926), pp.196-197. 

Books by Charles Morice

 Paul Verlaine. par Charles Morice. Paris: Leon Vanier, 1888. 
 Du Sens Religieux de la Poésie.. Sur le mot Poésie. Le principe social de la Beauté. Paris: Vanier, 1893, Pages uncut. 
 Paris Almanach 1897. Texte de Charles Morice. Illustrations de A. Lepère. Paris: Librairie Ed. Sagot, 1897. No. 54. 
 Il est Ressuscité. Paris: Albert Messein, 1911. Boxed, signed. 
 Paul Gauguin. Manuscript, 198 pages. Pages 85-91, 102-115 are printed. Boxed, undated. 
 Paul Gauguin. Paris: H. Floury, Editeur, 1919. Illustrated, 231p. (iv, iv). Boxed. #656801. 
 Paul Gauguin. Paris: H. Floury, Editeur, 1920. Illustrated, 252p. (iv). Boxed. Chapters are the same as in the 1919 edition but the illustrations are different.

Collaborations

 Les Cathédrales de France, by Auguste Rodin, Introduction by Charles Morice. Paris: Librairie Armand Colin, 1914. One bound copy and one in wrappers (pages uncut). 

 Noa Noa, by Paul Gauguin and Charles Morice. Paris: Editions de la Plume, 1901. 239p. (ii). Danielson,  Gauguin in the South Seas, says the 1902 edition “in fact comes closest to Gauguin’s original conception of the book” (page 244). 

Paul Gauguin,  Noa Noa. Edition Définitive, Bois dessinés et Gravés d’après Paul Gauguin par Daniel de Monfreid. Paris: Les Editions G. Crès et Cie., 1929. l54 pages (ii).This edition, in the editors’ Note, “est de Gauguin, sauf les Pages Liminaires: La Mémoire at l’Imagination, le Chapetre Ier: Songeries, et les Poèmes qui sont de Charles Morice.” 

Paul Gauguin et Charles Morice,  Noa Noa manuscript in Morice’s hand, dated 1897. With poems found in 1901 edition and a preface by Morice (p.1) not found there. 208 pages (212 leaves), boxed. xi chapters. 

 Noa Noa manuscript with colored illustrations. 204 pages, xii chapters, undated. 

 Noa Noa facsimile edition by Daniel Jacomet. No. 255 of 1,000 produced. Paris: Sagot-Le Garrec. [36 pages] with 5 leaves tipped in. Letter, in facsimile, from Charles Morice to Edmund Sagot, Vanvers, undated (October 1908), laid in with envelope, on Gauguin’s manuscript, 1954.

Books to which Morice Contributed

Théodore de Banville,  Choix de Poésies. Paris: Bibliothèque-Charpentier. “Preface” by Charles Morice, pages v-xxvii, 1912. 

 La Cinquantenaire de Charles Baudelaire. Ernest Raynaud, editor. Paris: Maison du Livre, 1917. Morice’s contribution is on pages 91-94.

Other Printed Materials

 Ecrits pour l’Art. A monthly publication sponsored by “Le Groupe Symbolique et Instrumentiste,” Stéphane Mallarmé, Maitre.” Nos. 1-6 (1887 January 7-June 7). Portraits laid in: René Ghil (no. 1), Stuart Merrill (no. 2), Henri de Régnier (no. 5), Villiers de l’Isle-Adam (no. 6). 

 La Plume; littéraire, artistique, philosophique. Léon Deschamps, editor, 1889-1899; Karl Boès, 1901-1904. Volumes 1-18, 1889 April 15-1912 December 15. 

Programmes 1 & 2. Theatre d’Art. Saison 1891-1892. Programme de la Première Représentation... de la Deuxième Representation", 1891-1892. 

Théâtre d’Art. Fêtes par Paul Verlaine. Représentation au bénéfice de Paul Verlaine et Paul Gauguin. Sous le patronage de Stéphane Mallarmé, Paul Verlaine, Jean Moréas, Charles Morice, Henri de Régnier. Directeur: Paul Fort. With “Cherubin: La Chanson de Don Juan,” poésie de Charles Morice, 1891 May. 

Catalogue d’une vente de 30 Tableaux de Paul Gauguin. Preface per Octave Mirbeau. (Paris: Grande Imprimerie, 1891), 1891. 

Exposition d’Oeuvres de Paul Gauguin. Paris, Galerie A. Vollard, after 1902. 

Exposition Paul Gauguin. Paris, Galerie Ambroise Vollard, undated.

Microfilmed Materials

 Mercure de France. Paris, Modern series, 1891-1965. 

 La Revue Blanche. Paris, 1891-1903.

 

Description of Collection

The collection of Morice’s papers comprises nine boxes and sixteen volumes and is organized into printed material, his journals and notebooks which were called Petite Journaux, correspondence, and his manuscripts. The printed material largely consists of copies of books on which he collaborated. Twenty-one Petits Journaux cover Morice’s activities from November 18, 1896 to March 17, 1919. These volumes are diaries, but include an occasional note of expenses and income. Pages have been cut in many of these books with either portions or entire pages missing. In the notebooks, however, pages have been pasted in. These cahiers contains poetry, ballads, newspaper clippings and random phrases or sentences. The correspondence is divided alphabetically by writer with the exception of letters Madame Morice received and of the series of letters concerning the death penalty. The manuscripts are divided by title or topic; the poems are divided by title or first line. Over 500 leaves of “fragments” that await a scholar knowledgeable in Morice’s career to identify the portions; many pages are readily identified as belonging together. i.e., they are of the same size and are numbered, but appear incomplete.

A microfilmed copy of Mercure de France (1891-1965) and  La Revue Blanche (1891-1903) complement the original materials.

 

Organization and Arrangement

The collection is arranged into 3 series as follows:

Series 1: Petits Journaux and Notebooks, 1896-1919

Series 2: Correspondence, 1889-1929

          Subseries 2.1: General Correspondence

          Subseries 2.2: Letters to Morice Regarding the Death Penalty

          Subseries 2.3: Miscellaneous correspondence to Morice

          Subseries 2.4: Correspondence to Madame Morice

          Subseries 2.5: Letters Removed from the Petits Journaux          

Series 3: Morice Manuscripts, 1883-1970

Series 1 contains diaries and notebooks.

Series 2 contains general correspondence to and from Charles Morice. Box 3 folder 43 contains all of the correspondence sent to Morice while conducting a “distinguished” opinion poll concerning the death penalty in France. In 1901 Morice returned to Paris; Le Matin assigned him the regular coverage of the judicial court. This series of letters may have been the basis of an article on the topic; at least one letter asks for a copy of the issue containing their opinions. France did not abolish the death penalty, however, until 1981. Box 3 folder 45 contains correspondence to Madame Morice. Subseries 2.2 is regarding a "distinguished" opinion poll conducted by Morice concerning the death penalty in France. In 1901, Morice returned to Paris; Le Matin assigned him the regular coverage of the judicial court. This series of letters may have been the basis of an article on the topic; at least one letter asks for a copy of the issue containing their opinions. France did not abolish the death penalty, however, until 1981.

Series 3: Unless noted, the items are in Morice's handwriting. Box 9 contains numerous manuscript fragments. Some fragments have titles, but when there is no title present, the title is taken from a major theme or the first line. Box 9 folder 19 contains many miscellaneous poems that are variously paginated and dated, 1897-1918. Includes “Bouquets funersires,” Bruxelles, 1899, “En memoire de Cecil Standish,” “Larmes dens l’aurore,” “Quarante Ans,” and verses dedicated to Augusta Rodin. Box 9 folder 20 contains many miscellaneous poems, variously paginated and dated, 1890-1903. Verses dedicated to Edmond Rostend, on page about Charles Morice, on a military theme, one short verse signed which includes “San oublions Morice Charles.”

 

Patron Information

 

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Diamond, Temple University’s online library catalog: http://diamond.temple.edu/record=b1610558~S30

Research Access

Collection is open for research.

Collections Stored Off-Site

This collection may be housed off-site at the Library Depository, and require up to two business days to retrieve. Please review the finding aid and be prepared to identify specific materials to be retrieved. Contact the Special Collections Research Center in advance of your visit, so that materials may be relocated to the reading room for research.

Publication and Copyright Information

The Charles Morice Papers are the physical property of the Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries. Temple University holds literary rights only for material created by university employees and to material given to the university with such rights specifically assigned. For all other material, literary rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. Researchers are responsible for determining the identity of rights holders and obtaining their permission for publication and for other purposes where stated.

Preferred Citation

[Description and date of item], [Box/folder number], Charles Morice Papers, SPC.MSS.LT016, Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

 

Administrative Information

 

Acquisition Information

These Charles Morice papers were purchased by Temple from the Morice family in 1967 with legal rights which remained to the manuscript materials. Instrumental to the sale was Professor Doctor Marie-Georgette Steisel of Temple University. The acquisition was the first major purchase with the Library’s Samuel Paley Endowment Fund.           

Processing Information

The creation of the electronic guide for this collection was made possible through generous funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, administered through the Council on Library and Information Resources’ “Cataloging Hidden Special Collections and Archives” Project. Finding aid prepared by Stephanie Morris. Finding aid entered into the Archivists' Toolkit by Garrett Boos.      

           

Index Terms

 

The following headings have been used to index the description of this collection in Temple University’s electronic catalog:

Personal/Family Names:

Carrière, Eugène, 1849-1906

Gauguin, Paul, 1848-1903

Leclerc, Max, 1864-

Morice, Charles, 1861-1919

Rodin, Auguste, 1840-1917

Subjects:

Artists

Authors

Poetry

Poets

Symbolism (Art movement)

Places:

Paris (France)

Material Types:

Correspondence. 

Diaries. 

Manuscripts. 

Poems. 

Scrapbooks. 

 

Inventory

 

Series 1: Petits Journaux and Notebooks, 1896-1919

 

Series 1 contains diaries and notebooks.

1          1          Diary, 1896 November 18-1897 March 27.

1          2          Diary, 1897 March 28-June 6.

1          3          Diary, 1897 July 26-August 28.

1          4          Diary, 1897 August 29-October 5.

1          5          Diary (some pages cut), 1897 October 6-November 11.

1          6          Diary, 1897 November 12-1898 March 7.

1          7          Diary, 1898 March 8-July 7.

1          8          Diary (some pages cut), 1898 July 8-October 15.

1          9          Diary, 1898 October 16-1899 January 9.

1          10          Diary, 1899 January 10-May 23.

1          11          Diary (2 journals fastened together by glue--15 August), 1899 May 26-November 2.

1          12          Diary, 1899 November 3-1900 October 7.

1          13          Diary, 1900 October 8-1901 December 31.

1          14          Diary (some pages cut), 1902 January 1-1903 March 7.

1          15          Diary, 1903 March 7-November 11.

1          16          Diary (some pages cut), 1903 November 12-1904 December 12.

1          17          Diary (some pages cut), 1904 December 12-1906 June 19.

1          18          Diary, 1908 March 19-1909 August 20.

1          19          Diary, 1909 August 30-1911 March 2.

1          20          Diary, 1911 March 2-1912 May 31.

1          21          Diary, 1912 June 1-1914 February 22.

2          22          Notebook, 1915-1916.

2          23          Notebook, 1916 August 16-September 22.

2          24          Notebook, 1917 April 1-July 21.

2          25          Notebook, 1917 July 21-1919 March 17.

2          26          Notebook “Travail de Versification”, 1901.

2          27          Notebook “Refrains de ballades gais”, 1902.

2          28          Notebook, undated.

2          29          Notebook with newspaper articles, book reviews by Morice, 1901-1911.

2          30          Notebook with ballads taken out of newspapers, with photograph, undated.

2          31          Notebook with newspaper articles written by Morice, 1908-1911.

                       

Series 2: Correspondence, 1889-1929

 

Series 2 contains general correspondence to and from Charles Morice. Box 3 folder 43 contains all of the correspondence sent to Morice while conducting a “distinguished” opinion poll concerning the death penalty in France. In 1901 Morice returned to Paris; Le Matin assigned him the regular coverage of the judicial court. This series of letters may have been the basis of an article on the topic; at least one letter asks for a copy of the issue containing their opinions. France did not abolish the death penalty, however, until 1981. Box 3 folder 45 contains correspondence to Madame Morice.

           

Subseries 2.1: General Correspondence

 

3          1          Adam, Paul. (1862-1920). Writer influenced by naturalism and symbolism. “Chateau de Montebise, Sunday,” Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf). Offering an article for publication inParis Journal. Adam introduces a new writer, André du Prenois, undated.

3          1          Adam, Paul. (1862-1920). Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Asking for the issue in which his article was to appear, undated.

3          2          Aurel. "27 Rue de Berri,” Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf). Gives his opinions on Morice’s book ( Il est Ressuscité. 1911, ?), discussing passages about Jesus in particular, undated.

3          2          Aurel. “Saint Cloud,” Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf). He writes of the loss of someone very dear to both of them, possibly Carrière, (died in 1906), undated.

3          3          Bergey. Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). The writer respects Morice and considers it an honor to have him as a friend, 1912 March 11.

3          3          Bergey. “31 B. de Port Royal,” Autograph letter signed. (1 page). Writer appreciates Morice’s concern (reasons for sympathy not given), undated.

3          4          Bernard, Emile (1868-1941). Paul Gauguin’s friend at Pont—Aven, Brittany. Bernard and Gauguin launched the synthetism school. Monica’s copy of 2 letters from Bernard to Gauguin, (5 pages on 5 leaves). Bernard discusses painting as a result of  sensations synthétisées and other painters, 1889.

3          4          Bernard, Emile (1868-1941). Pages 5-6, Morice uses ellipses (...), perhaps the transcription or inscription is incomplete. Bernard is responding to Gauguin’s letter. Two questions bother Bernard; one is about money and the other ease of working there [Tahiti]. Bernard asks to be remembered to [Emile] Schuffenecker, undated.

3          4          Bernard, Emile (1868-1941). Pages 7-10, “Notes sur Bernard.” Theme: Manuscript of Gauguin for an article written in response to accusations of plagiarism spread by Bernard before Gauguin’s last departure for Tahiti. A panel left at chez Gloanec (boarding house of Marie—Jeanne Gloanec) resembled exactly one by Seurat. Morice quotes “one of the great sculptors of our epoque” who said Bernard copied the ancient designs, [1896?].

3          5          Bolin, Gustave. “6, Rue Crete, IX e, Lundi” (4 pages on 1 leaf). Congratulates Morice on an article published in  Le Matin, undated.

3          6          Bourges, Elémir (1852-1925). Writer who mixed myth, history, philosophy and symbolism. Manuscript #2536, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Writer discusses Morice’s new book (title not given, but mentions spiritual view), undated, March 17.

3          7          Butrand, Louis. Nice, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer thanks Morice for his sympathetic critique of Sangué Martyrs(?), 1918 October 20.

3          8          Carrière, Eugène (1849-1906). Painter and lithographer, best known for his spiritual interpretations of maternity and family life. (Anvers ?) Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 2 leaves). Writer wishes he had more time for his family and for solitude. He has read Morice’s Conference (title not given) and  La Littérature de Tout à l’Heure he admires both, 1899 September 3.

3          9          Chichet, Etienne. Paris-Journal, Paris, Autograph letter signed (2 pages on 1 leaf). Asks about Morice’s plans and the 150 francs Morice was given for two books, 1911 April 19.

3          10          Coehin, D. Chambre des Députés, Paris, Monday, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer informs Morice of the approval of N. l’Archivèque” to use one of the churches in Luxembourg, either St. Sulpice or St. Etienne du Mont, for a speech, circa 1910s.

3          11          Desvallières, Georges. Painter. See also folder 24, box 4: “Enquête sur les Tendances Actuelles,” viii, page 352. “Sunday,” Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Writer is free to attend the baptism at St. George, undated.

3          12          Devors, Marcel. Revue de Paris, Autograph letter signed. (Postcard). Morice’s manuscript is analogous to Victor Marguerette’s  Les Frontiers de coeur, [no year] June 25.

3          13          Dolent, Jean (1835-1909). Art critic. Belleville, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Carrière has returned to Batignolen; Dolent gives his address. If Morice hasn’t sent his paper to the Revue he should send it to  la Revue Moderns. Belleville, December 12, 1900, card with Autograph letter signed. (on reverse). Social correspondence, 1898 January 18.

3          14          Van Dongen, Kees. Painter. See also folder 24, box 4: “Enquête sur les Tendances Actuelles,” iviii, page 352. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer has no photographs of his paintings to send Morice for the Russian periodical. He is interested in Morice’s article on his show, 1909 November 2.

3          15          Donnes, Maurice. Le Prieuré de Gaillonnet, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) He is unable to attend the meeting of the Comité artistique on August 13, 1911 August 8.

3          16          Ducoms, P.L. Atelier de France, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) He cannot meet Morice that evening because of a very important conference, undated.

3          16          Ducoms, P.L. Autograph letter signed. (1 page, with illustration of Madonna at the Cross, untitled) Arranging another meeting, undated.

3          17          Fagus. Autograph letter signed. (post card stamped March 23-24, 1899). About a paper putatively written by Morice who seems to renounce it because it is not in Morice’s handwriting, undated.

3          18          Fort, Paul (1872-1960). Poet and founder of Théâtre d’Art (1890). Edited  Vers et Prose, A.D.S. (1 page, Manuscript#2537). Written announcement of “Conférences de M. Charles Morice sur les Poëtes français,” a series of lectures. See Petit Journal xiii (spring 1899) for invitation to and remarks about “Conférences”, undated [1899?].

3          19          Grillet, Maria Louise. Vandenesee, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Her reflections on art. She has been studying the movements of the wind and describes its dance on a windy night, 1916 September 30.

3          20          Jerrold, Laurence. 96 Boulevard Pereire, Autograph letter signed, (3 pages on 1 leaf). A dinner to be given by “Les Amies de Carrière” will not take place. He thanks Morice for the copy of Il est Ressuascité. A banquet in honor of Verlaine ended in disaster, 1911 December 4.

3          21          Le Cardonnel, Georges. Cafe—Restaurant Cardinal, Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Reference to Diax (?) and Vallette. Rodin is satisfied with the article, 1911 March 4.

3          21          Le Cardonnel, Georges. “7 Rue Berthollet,” Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). He does not understand why Morice hasn’t written to him. Refers to Il est Ressuscité. Morice squanders his riches while others profit, 1911 April 17.

3          21          Le Cardonnel, Georges. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (carte pneumatique stamped November 11, 1911?). Refers to N. Chichet and an unidentified article by Morice. Mentions Revue Secondinaire(?), undated.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter. (1 page) Writer visited Rodin to show him the typed sample (of Morice’s introduction to Rodin’s Les Cathédrales de France). Rodin would not give the writer his notes for Morice to see as they were not in order. Writer told Rodin Morice was working resolutely and that he counted on having the manuscript by September, 1910 July 16.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter. (2 pages on 2 leaves) Reference to Clot and the plates. Writer (Leclerc) regrets the difficulties Morice is having in collaborating with Rodin. It goes without saying that the writer is at Morice’s complete disposal if a serious difficulty arises, 1910 August 4.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter signed. (2 pages on 2 leaves with autograph addition) Rodin asks to discuss Morice’s manuscript; he might be satisfied with seeing the proofs, 1910 August 8.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter signed. (1 page) Morice had asked that his work not be disturbed but the deadline has passed and Rodin is losing patience, 1910October 19.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter signed. (1 page) Writer has received manuscript and will inform Morice after the evaluation is done, 1910 November 10.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter signed. (1 page) Details of the manuscript’s publication, 1910 November 11.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter signed. (1 page) About the page proofs, 1910 December 5.

3          21          Librarie Armand Colin, Max Leclerc et H. Bourrelier, Editors. Paris, Typed letter signed. (1 page). About the page proofs, 1910 December 12.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (2 pages on 2 leaves). Concerning Morice’s payment and finishing the work, 1911 January 18.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) On M. Bourrelier’s conversation with Morice on 14 April. The writer is negotiating with English and German editors, 1911 May 4.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (by Leclerc’s assistant ?, 2 pages on 2 leaves) On negotiating an agreement to reproduce Morice’s lectures using phonographs, machines parlantes, etc, 1911 May 10.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) Asking when Morice will be finished his grandes pages, 1911 May 16.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) On a planned meeting with Rodin, 1911 June 3.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) Rodin has Morice’s edition, 1911 June 8.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) On Rodin’s book L’Art and Rodin’s delay in sending Morice new notes, 1911 June 13.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (2 pages on 2 leaves) On Morice’s new text, 1911 July 8.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (2 pages on 2 leaves) Rodin’s secretary returned the proofs. Rodin leaves the entire responsibility for the introduction to Morice, 1911 July 10.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (George Gressent, 1 page) On the additions Morice made, 1911 July 17.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) On Rodin’s notes and Morice’s suggestions for the book, 1911 July 19.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page). On the chapters “Nantes” and “Nevers”, 1911 July 25.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (2 pages on 2 leaves) On the printing, 1911 July 29.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (F. Bourdais, 1 page) On the proofs, 1911 August 3.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (3 pages on 3 leaves) Rodin replaced some of Morice’s text with his own, 1911 August 18.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) On the difficulties of publishing something “written by Rodin, improved by Rodin, written by Rodin”, 1911 August 23.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter signed. (1 page) On the problem of obtaining Rodin’s approval of Morice’s corrections, 1911 September 5.

3          22          Librarie Armand Colin. Max Leclerc. Typed letter. (2 pages on 2 leaves) Copy of Leclerc to Auguste Rodin. A brief review of conversations with Rodin, beginning with 3 June, about two sets of corrections and additions from Rodin, 1911 September 5.

3          23          Mauclair, Camille (1872-1945). Poet, novelist, critic and art historian. St. Len Taverny, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Writer agrees to write an article for Paris Journal, 1908 December 17.

3          23          Mauclair, Camille (1872-1945). Poet, novelist, critic and art historian. St. Len Taverny, Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf) Writer is annoyed that the Paris Journal has not published his contributions and hopes one will appear shortly, [no year] May 23.

3          24          Messein, Albert. Publisher. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Writer has received the corrections for Verlaine. He discusses Morice’s idea for “Ballet des Mains”, 1914 December 2.

3          25          Mirion, Louis. Baccarot, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf) Inviting Morice to come to Nancy so that they could work on their project together, 1911 October 6.

3          25          Mirion, Louis. Baccarot, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf) Discusses a poem, “Crimèn amoris”, 1911 December 5.

3          26          Mondrien(?), Oscar. Bruxelles, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Inviting Morice to visit his country home, 1901 May 21.

3          26          Mondrien(?), Oscar. Bruxelles, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Information on trains Morice can take and sending him 500 francs, 1901 May 24.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). One of the first Symbolist poets, a literary critic and author. “Le Premier Mai 1897,” draft of verses on Charles’ birthday, 2 leaves, undated.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Autograph letter signed to Albert Morice (2 pages on 1 leaf). Advice to Albert (his son) concerning his decision to become an actor and the hardships that accompany such a career, 1914 November 8.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Autograph letter signed to Albert (1 page). Thanking his son for the friendly words Albert had written, 1915 April 25.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Postcard, Autograph signed, to Albert. “Vive Jeanne d’Arc! Vive la France!”, 1915 May 17.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Autograph letter signed to “Mon Fils aimé” (l page). Morice is both sad and proud that Albert is joining the Army to fight for France, 1915 June 27.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Autograph letter signed to “Mon chèri” (2 pages on 1 leaf). Asking his son to come to Paris for a visit, 1917 April 7.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Autograph letter signed to “Mon chêri” (2 pages on 1 leaf). On the importance of doing well his duty as a soldier, 1917 April 13.

3          27          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). Autograph letter signed to Albert (3 pages on 1 leaf). On Germany, the war, and an interview with the pope printed in the Journal, [no year] June 22.

3          28          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). “Les Amies, de Carrières” Paris, to “Elizabeth,” his wife (4 pages on 1 leaf) Mentions a poem that didn’t get much attention, 1915 November 27.

3          28          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). To “Ma Héll” (Elizabeth). Discusses Paco, (Jean] Dolent and Marie de Nye. He is working on Tolstoy and others, [no year] September 19.

3          28          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). To “Mes Chérs” (with envelope stamped 6-7-08). Mentions Rodin and that he (Morice] wishes he could join his family as soon as possible, [1908] July 5.

3          28          Morice, Charles (1860-1919). To “Ma grande Chèrie, II: 1,” 2 pages (1 leaf, no signature), undated.

3          29          “Peco” “Paquite” was the nickname for Francisco Durrio, a dwarf-like Spanish sculptor who was a friend of Paul Gauguin, attending his weekly “at home” sessions in Paris, 1893-1894. Delsemme calls Paco “Morice’s shadow.” See also folder 24, box 4: “Enquête sur les Tendances Actuelles,” ix, pages 77-78. Bilbao, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf) The “Poete conferancier et critique d’art” was missed at a recent meeting, 1903 September 11.

3          29          “Peco” “Paquite.” Paris, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Thanking Morice for the article he wrote. “Mes Amis,” a paragraph by Morice about Paco (1 leaf), 1911 December 16.

3          30          Régnier, Henri de (1864-1936). Symbolist poet and novelist. Autograph letter signed. (1 page) At the moment he is unable to participate in a “hommage” for Verlaine, 1910 May 28.

3          30          Régnier, Henri de (1864-1936). “Lundi.” Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Writer is embarrassed at not having written something on Verlaine, 1910 June.

3          30          Régnier, Henri de (1864-1936). Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Writer is sending a small poem directly to Mehein (?), 1910 July.

3          30          Régnier, Henri de (1864-1936). Autograph letter signed. (Postcard stamped "11") Writer is unable to send what Morice requested, [1911] March 6.

3          30          Régnier, Henri de (1864-1936). “Thursday,” Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf, Mss. #2542). Asking Morice’s support in a campaign to stop the vandalism of the Palais Royal, undated.

3          30          Régnier, Henri de (1864-1936). “Sunday night,” Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf) Writer is sending a list of poems that could be recited, undated.

3          31          Rosny, J.H. Pseudonym of Honoré (1856-1940) and Gustin (1859-1948) Boex, novelists who combined realism with idealistic fervor. “72, Rue d’Alésia, xive,” Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Thanking Morice for his article on la Vague Rouge, undated.

3          32          Ségalen, Victor (1878-1919). Writer and ship’s doctor. Letterhead of China Navigation Company’s S.S. Takou Chine, Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf, Mss. #2535) Writer informs Morice about his work. He had been in China and intends to stay another 3 years and get enough material to write a book on the emperors, especially Tsai-Tien. The book would be “Le Fils du Ciel.” Mentions Gauguin, undated.

3          33          Séquin, Armand. Engraver who was part of Gauguin’s Pont Aven and Paris circles, 1894-1895. Hotel de la Croixe (?) Verte. Writer finds himself abandoned by all his friends and hopes that Morice will answer him, 1896 October 12.

3          34          Sigoguin, Emile. Cercle Artistique et Littéraire, Bruxelles, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Writer obtained 800 francs for Morice from someone who wished to remain anonymous, 1902 June 7.

3          35          Tailhade, Laurent (1854-1919). Poet. “47, Rue du Ranelagh. xvie,” Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf, Mss. #2534). Writer describes his visit with George Le Cardonnel. Morice had offered Tailhade the chance to collaborate at the Paris Journal while Morice was absent. Le Cardonnel did not know of this but was agreeable, 1911 April 23.

3          36          Upirieux (?). Draquiquan, Autograph letter signed. (6 pages on 2 leaves) Writer will apply for a position at a new university at Cannes and asks for Morice’s support. Writer describes the trip he and his wife took from Paris to Cote d’Azur where they were ill, 1912 March 24.

3          36          Upirieux (?). Draquiquan, Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf) Writer thanks Morice for the book he sent to Cannes. Writer describes himself as having “the tongue of a writer and the imagination of the poet." He apologize for his “bad French", 1913 April 14.

3          37          Valipaux, Félix. Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer gives his opinion of several aspects of the modern theater; for example, it is searching for truth and simplicity and there are numerous young writers of drama, 1896 September 26.

3          38          Vallette, A. An editor (?) of Mercure de France, a literary review founded by symbolist writers in 1890. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf) Morice’s article will appear in the January 1 issue, 1918 December 8.

3          38          Vallette, A. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf) Forwarding a letter for Morice that came to Mercure and asking for his address, 1919 January 6.

3          38          Vallette, A. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Sending MoriceVie des Martyrs, 1919 January 14.

3          38          Vallette, A. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf) Writer is not able to print Morice’s book because of the disorganization of the company after the war, 1919 February 7.

3          38          Vallette, A. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf)Mercure cannot publish Morice’s story in two volumes because the war and the armistice have left the public uninterested in buying this kind of book, 1919 February 14.

3          38          Vallette, A. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf) On the death of their friend Menton (?); writer had contacted the Havas agency which would release the news when Morice’s telegram arrived, 1919 March 20.

3          38          Vallette, A. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf)Mercure cannot publish Morice’s book of poems because of the current economic circumstances. It is necessary to print four to five thousand copies and sell three-fifths of these the first year. This could never happen with a book of poems, 1919 December 20.

3          39          Vauxcelles, Louis. Central Hotel, Bort (Corrége). Writer will attend the Comité de Défense artistique meeting, 1918 July 25.

3          39          Vauxcelles, Louis. “15 Rue Gustave Zédé,” Autograph letter signed. (a card, torn) Writer asks for a position with the Paris Journalwhere Morice is director of “artistic services”, undated.

3          40          Willette, Adolphe (1857-1926). Painter. See also folder 24, box 4: Enquête sur les tendances actuelles,” ix page 78. Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on a card with a black border). Writer became ill at the Cafè-Voltair where the Congress against pornography met, undated.

3          40          Willette, Adolphe (1857-1926). “28 Rue Lacroix, xvii e,” Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on a card with a black border) Thanks Morice for his reference to Theodore de Bauville, undated.

3          40          Willette, Adolphe (1857-1926). Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on a card). Writer refers to his defense campaign instead of Morice’s. Writer saw 60 policemen protecting the work of M. Berengen, Undated.

3          41          Willy (The pen-name of Henri Gauthier-Villars). Editor of La Révolte. “28, Rue Jacob,” Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Writer’s many thanks to the Committee (?). Writer describes himself as “anarchiste”, undated.

3          42          Zulouga, Ignacio de (1870-1945). Spanish painter. See also folder 24, box 4, “Enquête sur les Tendances Actuelles.” page 63. Morice’s letter to Zulouga, Menton, Autograph Letter. (1 page with envelope). Despite his severe illness, Morice is working passionately on the work which he hopes to leave as a spiritual testament to the world, undated.

 

Subseries 2.2: Letters to Morice Regarding the Death Penalty

 

Subseries 2.2 is regarding a "distinguished" opinion poll conducted by Morice concerning the death penalty in France. In 1901, Morice returned to Paris; Le Matin assigned him the regular coverage of the judicial court. This series of letters may have been the basis of an article on the topic; at least one letter asks for a copy of the issue containing their opinions. France did not abolish the death penalty, however, until 1981.

 

3          43          Brieux, Eugène (1858-1932). Dramatist concerned with moral and social reform. “21, rue d’Aumale,” Autograph letter signed (1 page) Writer is against the death penalty, undated.

3          43          De Banges, Colonel. Versailles, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). The death penalty is a check on perverse natures and should be kept or replaced with a penalty worse than death, 1902 February 22.

3          43          Dejeaille, M. Member of Chambre des Députés. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer is against the death penalty; a humanistic society should be above all crimes, 1902 February 21.

3          43          Durkheim, Emile (1858-1917). Professor of sociology at the University of Bordeaux, now sometimes called the father of modern sociology. Bordeaux. The history of punishment shows that the death penalty is part of a repressive system, 1902 March 5.

3          43          Eekhoud, Georges. Bruxelles, Autograph letter signed to “Mon Cher Dejongle” (6 pages, with blue lines crossing out various portions of the letter) Man does not have the right to kill. In Belgium and other countries of progress, they do not apply this penalty. Post script in response to an invitation from Charles Morice, 1902 February 18.

3          43          Errere, Paul. Bruxelles, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Writer sends a copy of a letter from Victor Hugo who lived in West Flandres in 1862. The death penalty should not be applied, 1902 March 15.

3          43          Hugo, Victor (1802-1885). Romance poet and novelist. Hauteville House [Guernsey]. Copy of a letter (see latter from Paul Errere). The death penalty should be abolished, [1862] February 8.

3          43          Kovalevsky, Maxime. Professor of law at the University of Moscow. Autograph letter signed. (8 pages on 2 leaves). The death penalty is connected to the genre of sacrifice, undated.

3          43          Lie, Jonas. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (l page). The abolition of the death penalty is an extremely humanitarian idea, 1902 February 27.

3          43          Magnaud. President. Chateau Eluèrry. Writer is a resolute adversary of the death penalty because the most upright man is fallible, 1902 February 23.

3          43          Ménégoz, E. Faculty of Protestant Theology, University of Paris. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer opposes the death penalty for crimes of jealousy, hate, love and vengeance but would send assassins to the scaffold. He uses religious examples and asks for two copies of the number which publishes these lines, 1902 February 18.

3          43          Monod, Gabriel (1844-1915). Historian, founder and editor of Revue Historique. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (l page). Writer is against irrevocable punishment; the only groups for whom this penalty is acceptable are the incorrigibles and the brutes, 1902 February 25.

3          43          Nordau, D.N. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). The degree of civilization of a society is measured by its respect for the human life. Execution as a determent is pure superstition, 1902 February 24.

3          43          Reclus, Jean Jacques Elisée (1830-1905). French geographer who was banished in 1871 for his connection with the Paris Commune. His greatest work was Nouvelle géographié universelle (20 volumes, 1875-1894). Autograph letter signed. (1 page, torn). We ought to have finished with the death penalty but who will set the example?, undated.

3          43          Richet, Charles (1850-1935). French physiologist and author, professor of medicine at University of Paris and received the Nobel prize for physiology and medicine (1913). Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer condemns the death penalty but has no sympathy for the three or four sinister rascals sent to the other world by human justice, undated.

3          43          Severo, A. Brazilian. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Brazil, the writer’s country, replaced the death penalty with thirty years imprisonment. Writer would abolish the death penalty, 1902 February 24.

3          43          Signature not clear: Cricarz, P.? “32, Rue des Mathurins, Feb. 11.” Autograph letter signed. (1 page). The death penalty is too vast a subject to treat in one letter; it needs volumes. Writer asks to be excused from answering, [1902] February 11.

3          43          Signature not clear: Passy, Fred.? Société Francaise d’Arbitrage Entre Nations, Paris, Autograph letter signed. (l0 pages on 3 leaves) Society has the responsibility to protect itself and its members but not the right to punish for the sake of punishment. The individual does not have the right to kill and society does not have rights other than those of the individual, 1902 February 12.

3          43          Denis, Hector. Chambre des Representants. Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Writer discusses the march of criminality in Belgium, undated.

 

Subseries 2.3: Miscellaneous correspondence to Morice

 

3          44          Danier? Davos Platz-Grisons, Autograph letter signed (4 pages on 1 leaf). Discusses unidentified proofs and the illness of the writer’s father, 1899 March 3.

3          44          Le Maitre, Jule? Savel (?), Autograph letter signed. (1 page). Discusses Leo Tolstoi [sic], 1901 April 6.

3          44          Barryloin (?), Dr. Reproduction of Autograph letter signed. (In German), 1902 April 5.

3          44          Maufra, Maxime. Painter. See also folder 24, box 4, “Enquête sur les Tendances Actuelles,” pages 61-62. “25 Boulevard de Lichy,” Autograph letter signed. (1 page, torn). Inviting Morice to visit his workshop, 1904 July 14.

3          44          Meittwuard (?), A. République Françaisé, Conseil Municipal, Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). The information Morice seeks is in Promenades à travers Paris by Rochegude, 1912 July 26.

3          44          Librarie Charles Delagrave. Widanars, G. (?) Paris, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Discusses books on Degas and Rodin and mentions Camille Mauclair [1872-1945, poet and art historian], 1912 October 9.

3          44          Director, Palais du Louvre, Musées Nationaux, Amuces (?). Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Writer is leaving the Commission because of hostilities among certain sculptors, 1918 December 23.

3          44          Ucaumores (?) Autograph letter signed. (carte pneumatique stamped 11[1911]). Writer was unable to bring his book to Morice today. Mentions Chichel, undated.

3          44          Le Figaro, Capus, Alfred and Dayons (?). “26, Rue Drouot,” Wednesday, 2 Autograph letter signed (2 pages on 1 leaf). Dayons found Capus’ letter to Morice. Mentions a recent article (details not given) and asks for the text of the circular (details not given), undated.

3          44          Santoran, A. Autograph letter signed. (to M. Haberneck?, 1 page). Writer found addressee’s program (no details given) very distinguished, undated.

3          44          Mantz (?), Abbé. Genoa, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf, torn). Writer has never been so happy; he is enjoying the opportunity to research in several libraries, [no year] March 8.

3          44          Envelope from Théatre National de l’opéra. Stamped (on reverse): Vanves, Seine, 1-5, 12, 1912? May 1.

3          44          Carrillo, E. Gomes. Page 4 of Autograph letter signed. (?). On perpetuating the memory of poets, undated.

 

Subseries 2.4: Correspondence to Madame Morice

 

3          45          Grats, Charles. Paris. Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf, bordered in black). Thanking her for an invitation to dinner, 1909 August 24.

3          45          Eugel, Jane Bathors. “90, Boulevard Péreire,” Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Discusses lessons writer could give Madame Morice’s students in the writer’s house, [no year] March 8.

3          45          Fontainas, André (1865-1948). French writer associated with symbolists. Author of verse, novels, and critical studies. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (3 pages on 1 leaf). Discusses Rideau de Pourpre of Charles Morice. Writer disclaims any critical attitude toward the posthumous volume, 1921 June 10.

3          45          Rambosson, Yvanhoe. Secretary-Géneral of Fédération des Sociétés d’Art. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (2 pages on 1 leaf). Informing her that Van Gogh’s various signatures may be found inL’Oeuvre de Vincent Van Gogh by M.J B. de la Faille. For other information she should contact de la Faille himself, 1929 July 8.

3          45          Maury, Lucien. Revue Bleue & Revue Scientifique. Paris, Autograph letter signed. (4 pages on 1 leaf). Writer apologies for the misinterpretation of his article about Charles Morice, 1920 August 6 (?).

3          45          Meüerlié, H. (?). Musée Rodin, Autograph letter signed. (1 page) Confirming an appointment, 1921 April 8.

3          45          Envelope addressed to Madame Charles Morice. à la Clairien, Neuville, stamped with date, 1908 August 31.

 

Subseries 2.5: Letters Removed from the Petits Journaux      

 

3          46          Letter removed from Petit Journal xii: signed Daniel, (Baud-Bovy?) 3 pages (1 leaf) “to “Cher Morice,” Lundi, 12, xii 98. Discusses Voltaire and mentions several other French writers, “Daniel” has not read Morice’s book yet, he then discuss cathedrals and Jesus Christ (Du Sens Religieus de le Poésie, 1893?), [1898 December 12].

3          46          Letter removed from Petit Journal xii: Receipt, for thirty francs received from Charles Morice, L’Abbé de St. Yves, Ixelles, for one month’s rent in advance, 1898 October 10.

3          46          Letter removed from Petit Journal xii: Postage receipt, Bruxelles, 1898 October 11-12.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): “J.-B. M.” à Charles Morice, Lyon, 23 Janv. 1900.” Exhorting his friend to have courage, 1900 January 23.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): “Therésa, de Librement?” (mentioned in  Petite Journal xiv as “Madame Therésa, and in  Petit Journal xv, on 12 Avril “Chez Thérésa on craint un catastrophe immédiate”) 4 pages (1 leaf). Discusses correspondence with Morice and Elizabeth, 1903 October 28.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): “Theresa” to “cher ami,” “Jeudi 10 Octobre,” with newspapers clipping attached “Scène émouvante au conseil de guerre.” (4 pages 1 leaf). Charles (Thérésa’s husband?) asked her to send Morice the clipping. Refers to Morice’s article, “Légende du Coeur” and Marie de Nys and an “injustice” (no details given), undated.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): Thérése to “cher ami,” “Mercredi” (2 pages 1 leaf). Paper is bordered in black. She refers to a caper (no details given) for which Morice’s wife Elizabeth will never forgive her, undated.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): “Marie de Nys” to “cher ami,” (2 pages 1 leaf). Writer thanks Morice. Has written to M. Castillan, M. Rouchemberg, and M. Reblain, secretary to M. Rothschild. The fall (unspecified) could compromise the writer's poetic performance, undated.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): “By” (Morice’s stepdaughter Gabrielle) to “Mon Papa Chéri," St. Alban, 2p. (1 leaf). Gabrielle is taking baths at St. Alban’s. “Mémé”. 1 leaf. Brief note: “bonne fête papa.” 4 9bre (November 4), [1900] August 29.

3          47          Letters removed from Petit Journal xv (1899-1900): “W. Wuret” to Monsieur,” Yzengremer (?), 14 Octobre 03. (2 pages 1 leaf). Writer thanks Morice, undated.

3          48          Letters removed from Petit Journal xix: “Thérésa, Mardi, (6 pages 2 leaves). Morice has not written her, 1904 October 29.

3          48          Letters removed from Petit Journal xix: “Dimanche” 1 leaf, Paper is bordered in black. Tells Morice to have courage, undated.

 

Series 3: Morice Manuscripts, 1883-1970

 

Series 3: Unless noted, the items are in Morice's handwriting. Box 9 contains numerous manuscript fragments. Some fragments have titles, but when there is no title present, the title is taken from a major theme or the first line. Box 9 folder 19 contains many miscellaneous poems that are variously paginated and dated, 1897-1918. Includes “Bouquets funersires,” Bruxelles, 1899, “En memoire de Cecil Standish,” “Larmes dens l’aurore,” “Quarante Ans,” and verses dedicated to Augusta Rodin. Box 9 folder 20 contains many miscellaneous poems, variously paginated and dated, 1890-1903. Verses dedicated to Edmond Rostend, on page about Charles Morice, on a military theme, one short verse signed which includes “San oublions Morice Charles.”

4          1          “L’Action Humaine.” “Entre le Rêve et L’Action,” draft, 2 pages draft, 1 leaf, copy of printed article, 1 leaf. Morice was editor of L’Action Humaine, a bimonthly review appearing in two series: 1900-1901 and 1907, 1903 March 28-April 3.

4          2          “Aller au Peuple.” article from Mercure draft, 2 pages, undated.

4          3          “Analyse de Deux Iphigénis l’Euripide.” plan (?) pages 2-12, (missing page 5, 7), 11 leaves (2 not paginated), undated.

4          4          “L’Art d’Ecrire.” “Sur l'art et le métier d’écrere,” (4 pages) 25 leaves, some numbered 170—174, on the size and type of paper found in some of Morice’s “Cahiers,” notes, undated.

4          5          “L’art Theatral.” “Conférence sur l’art theatral, Mars 1905, Institut des Hts. Etudes à Bruxelles.” 14 pages (p.12 missing), 1905 March.

4          6          “L’ Audace." “Commentaires, XXIII,” 3 pages, signed, 1906 February 18.

4          7          “L’Autre Renaissance.” pages 2-7, beginning “En 1913,” with printer’s marks. pages 2-8, in which the writer will indicate the difficulties in artistic production. The plan of a book in which the author revised the ideas in La Littérature de Tout à l’Heure (see Delsemme, page 15), 1913.

4          8          “Le Ballet des Mains.” “Premier Discours,” 4 pages, notes (?), “Le Ballet des Mains,” 2 pages “Prologue,” 5 pages 5 leaves, including a plan. “Le Ballet des Mains” (4 leaves), plan, verse, 2 pages prose, incomplete, undated.

4          9          Baudelaire, Charles. “Les Fleurs du Mal. Introduction par Charles Morice. Paris,” signed and dated. 4 pages (5 leaves) that appeared on pages 91-94, in La Cinquantenaire de Charles Baudelaire (Paris: Maison du Livre, 1917). The volume is in Rare Books, Temple University, 1917 April 10.

4          10          De Banville, Théodore. Conference, et l’Odion, “a propos d’une reprise de Florise.” 3l pages, incomplete, prose and poetry. Morice wrote the Introduction to a volume of de Banville  Choix de Poésies(1912), 1912 June 6.

4          11          “La Belgique.” “Preface, iii page and 3 leaves poetry. “Avertissement” and 3 leaves poetry. Part (?) of L’Esprit belge, (Bruxelles G. Balat, 1899), undated.

4          12          Carrière, Eugène. Review of his work in L’Art Nouveau no title but mentions the divine family), page 2-4. Review of Camille Pissarro; page 5-6, incomplete. Notes, page 3-5; 5, 25-28 March (these 4 leaves appear to be part of a diary as page 3 includes “El mon Fils, sera, le 19 mai, sa première communion”), undated.

4          13          Carrière, Eugène. “Les Amis de Carrière. Discours du 22 décembre 1909,” Plan, 27 pages (missing page 6-9), 1909 December 22.

4          13          Carrière, Eugène. “Le Monument de Carrière,” 1 leaf, 1916 October 20-1917 January 4.

4          14          “Les Conditions modernes de la Beauté.” “Introduction à L’Ame dans les Yeux.” Plan and 2l pages (missing pages 4, 5), undated.

4          15          “Les Conditions modernes de is Beauté.” 35 leaves, variously paginated. Morice published a book of this title in Prague, 1907. These might be the French drafts of the volume published in Czech, undated.

4          16          “La Conscience.” 6 pages, signed. Mentions Pierre Lecler who is distinguished by the intense spirituality of his ideal, undated.

4          17          “La Conversation Lyrique.” A play, 44 leaves, undated.

4          18          “La Courage.” "Conte inédit,” 12 pages signed, undated.

4          19          “Crimèn Amoris.” Dedicated to Claude Debussy, 8 pages. See also folder 25, box 3 for letter from Louis Mirion, December 5 1911, discussing a poem of this title, undated.

4          20          “La Cycle Mystique.” “Aperçu général de la littérature, 6 e Leçcon. Le Cycle Mystique. 5  e Leçcon.” 8 pages, signed, undated.

4          21          Dans l’espérance et dans l’angoisse.” 5 pages, [“pendant la grande Guerre”, undated.

4          22          “La Danse.” “La gout de la Danse,” 8 leaves, 4 pages. “Esaai sur la Danse,” 3 leaves. “Sur la danse” notes: 9 leaves, 7 leaves, undated.

4          23          “Les Directions actuelles de la Pensée plastique.” “Introduction,” 29 leaves, undated.

4          23          “Appendice: Enquête sur les tendances actuelles des arts plastiques,” 3 leaves, manuscript, pages 349-359, Mercure de France, (I-viii-1905), pages 538-555,  Mercure de France, (15-viii-1905), pages 61-84,  Mercure de France (1-ix-1905). Printed pages are replies from artists to questions listed on page 349", undated.

4          24          “Le Dispersion présente.” 2 leaves, undated.

4          25          “Encore les Amants de Venise.” 8 pages, signed, undated.

4          26          “Etudes Historique.” “Precis et Concordances d’Histoire universelle,” 4 leaves, undated.

4          27          “Etudes Religieux.” “Lecture de l’Exposé de la Doctrine Catholique, par l’abbé Girodon,” 8 pages, begun July 2, 1912. Sections on Faith, Revelation, Sacred Writing, the Church, 1912.

4          28          “La Folie d’Herbelion.” “Conte fantastique,” 4 pages, [perhaps inspired by the war, 1914-1918], undated.

4          29          “Les Frontières de l’Humanité.” 5 leaves, signed, undated.

4          30          “La Glorie.” 3 pages, with printer’s notations, undated.

4          31          “Goëthe et Faust.” 6 leaves, variously paginated, undated.

4          32          “Goëthe: Thérésiennes sur Faust.” 18 leaves. Notes (?), 1900 [November] 9-November 28.

4          33          (“Les Grands Initiés”]. 9 leaves (pages 2-ll, missing pages 5, pages 2 and 6 torn), undated.

4          34          “A Monsieur Gringalet, artiste dramatique.” 4 leaves, pages 87-90, poetry and prose, incomplete, undated.

5          1          “Histoire, de la Peinture flamande” depuis des origines jusqu’au xviii Siècle.” Introduction, 40 leaves, in three parts. “6 e Leçon,” 35 leaves (34 pages). XI, 18 leaves. XIV, 9 leaves (pages l-8 and 10). Untitled, 10 leaves (pages 2-14, missing 7, 10 and 13). “Les Hesitations de is Peinture française en 1909,” 6 leaves, undated.

5          2          “Histoire de la Poésie Française.” “Première Leçon,” (5 leaves), 39 pages, [1 leaf]. “Vue générale-Méthode,” 8 pages. “Dix Leçons par Charles Morice,” 5 pages, “Plan,” 3 pages, “I: Le Sujet et la Méthode,” 2 pages, “le Volume, [4 pages]. Outline and Notes, 7 leaves (variously sized). Announcement, printed with Comédia Illustré heading, 1916 November 4.

5          3          “Histoire de la Poésie Française.” “Troisième Leçon: Verlaine et Baudelaire,” 9 leaves. Untitled pages, 10 leaves, variously sized and paginated. “Seconde des Dix Leçons: Verlaine,” 7 leaves (variously paginated). “VI: Divisions de cette Etude,” 3 leaves, “VI: Méthode,” 1 leaf. “XIV: La Lumière de Verlaine,” 2 leaves. “III e: Verlaine et Baudelaire,” 5 pages. “Quatrième Leçon: Le Romantisme,” 23 pages (missing page 22), [2 pages], “Plan,” (2 pages), 7 pages, 3 pages, 1 leaf. “Hommage à Verlaine,” outline, 2 leaves. “Sixiême Leçon: L’Idéal Classique,” 36 pages, Outline, 4 pages, 2 leaves notes, undated.

5          4          “Histoire de la Poésie Française.” “IV: La Renaissance, l’Antiquité et le Moyen-Age,” 8 leaves (variously sized and paginated), “7 eLeçon, [7 pages], V, VI, VII, 3 leaves. “I. Recapitulation et Princeps,” l0 pages “7  e Leçon. I. Rappels et Précisions.” 7 pages; “II. Les Deux Poles,” 3 leaves, outline, 6 pages, undated.

5          5          “Histoire de la Poésie Française.” “VIII e Leçon L’Ame du Moyen Age, Plan,” 2 leaves; Plan, 2 leaves; I. Encore de la Renaissance,” l0 pages, “II. L’ame du Moyen Age,” 3 pages; “III. Comment finit le Moyen Age,” 5 pages; “IV: Aperçu de l’Autre Renaissance,” 7 pages. “IV.” Plan of “9  e Leçon” and notes, 3 leaves. “IX  e Leçon. Renaissance et Moyen Age,” 28 pages, undated.

5          6          “Hollande.” “C’est (aussi?] qu’il convient le voyage portant, mais en Holland particulierment. La Hollande...,” pages 5-19, undated [post 1897].

5          7          “Les Hommes d’aujourd’hui.” “Auguste Baud-Bovy," 6 pages, undated [post 1892].

5          7          “Les Salons de 1895, par M. Roger Marx,” 7 pages, undated.

5          8          “Les Hommes d’aujourd’hui.” “Medardo Rosso,” Impressionistic sculptor, 2 leaves, undated.

5          9          “Idée d’un 'Bulletin des Traductions.’” Prospectus (?) for a “Bulletin” to announce the availability of translated works, 6 pages. “d’un ‘Bulletin des Traductions,’” 3 pages, 2 leaves the last of which is signed, undated (circa 1900?).

5          10          “Il est Ressucité.” Incomplete draft of “Preface,” 6 pages; the book was eventually published in 1911. See also untitled fragments, box 9, for pages on religious theme, undated.

5          11          “L’Initiativ Populaire.” On capital punishment, 4 pages. See also folder of Letters on the Death Penalty, 1902, undated.

5          12          “L’Iphigénie de Jean Moréas.” “Moréas” was the name adopted by Iannis Pappadiamantopoulos (1856-1910), a poet born in Athena, Greece, but who lived in Paris after 1870. Review of Moréas’ work, mentioning Les Mystéres, Les Cantilènes (1886), and  Les Coutés, 4 pages, undated.

5          13          “Les Livres, Les Stances de Jean Moréas.” Part of a longer work, 3 pages. First page is described “Suite” and last page is “a suivre”, undated.

5          14          “Leçons Sur la Langue Français.” “Etudes linguistiques ou Scientifiques,” 3 pages (4 leaves). “Leçons,” 19 leaves. Section “III,C-L’Architecture jusqu’au XV e,” has several drawings, undated.

5          15          “Leçons Sur les Légendes” “Leçons,” 6 leaves, notes. “La Vie Ordinaire,” 8 leaves, undated.

5          16          “Les Lettres-Les Arts.” “La mort de Cézanne,” 5 leaves, undated.

5          17          “Lettres de la Fiancée.” Fragment, 2 leaves (one labeled “7”), undated.

5          17          “La Littérature de Tout à l’Heure.” Manuscript published by Perrin in Paris, 1889, letter tipped in, to Delzant, March 9, 1892, offering him the manuscript; (iv), 362 pages (l page), 1889, 1892.

6          1          “La Lumière brille en Occident.” Incomplete draft about the Catholic Church, the separation of church and state and the Renaissance, [9 pages], undated.

6          2          “Les Mains sur la Livre.” “II. Les Ports Drapeau, Paris,” 2 pages incomplete; cover is signed, undated.

6          3          “Les Mains blanches.” On the hands of a poet and others, 5 pages, undated.

6          4          “La Maison du Temps.” “II e et III  e: L’Edification et la Decoration,” 16 pages (17 leaves), an address (?) for an unspecified conference. On poets, writers, Egyptian temples, churches. See  Mercure de France, volume 61 (June 15, 1906), undated.

6          5          “Stéphane Mallarmé." 22 pages. (Mallarmé died in 1898; page 2 refers to “His second death...”). Announcement of a talk by Morice, to be given February 15, 1899, The Hague, undated.

6          6          “Stéphane Mallarmé." (Conference de Bruxelles) [3l] pages (32 leaves), (first sentence refers to “the death of the poet, i.e. 1898), undated.

6          6          “Stéphane Mallarmé." Printed invitation, to hear Morice talk on January 20, 1899, 1899 January 16.

6          7          “Je Vous Parle.” “Manifeste: 6 fevrier 1919. Achevé 15 mars,” 4 pages. “I. Paix sur la terre,” 13 pages “II. La déviation de la Renaissance,” pages 14-36; “III. La Chatement; les Recours,” pages 37-64. “Je Vous Parle,” 1 leaf, describing some of Morice’s writings. As Morice died on March 17, 1919, this was his last finished work, undated.

6          8          “La Martine.” Conference, pages 3, 6, 12-30. Discusses Voltaire, undated.

6          9          “Méditations esthétiques.” Plan, 7 leaves, manuscript, “L’Art est-il--’une femme nue?’” 2 leaves manuscript, 8 pages (5 leaves) printed material pasted on. “Le Mendiant et La Banquier,” 10 pages (5 leaves), printed. “L’Art est uno défenition de la Vie,” 7 pages (5 leaves), printed. “Les Lettres et les Arts Contemporains,” 2 pages manuscript. “La Mystique Chrétienne,” 3 pages (4 leaves), printed. “Un rite,” 3 pages (2 leaves), printed. “L’Art, la Science,” August 12, 1900, 2 pages manuscript. “Méditation sur les Conditions présents de la Production littéraire,” 7 pages manuscript, 1900, undated.

6          10          “Les Deux Mysticismes.” Incomplete, pages 1-7, 25-34. La Revue de Paris (page 1), undated.

6          11          [Notes for critical essay on literature] Pages 2-248 (missing pages 15-16, 20, 28, 34-35, 90, 99-100, 121, 186, 191, 200, 202, 205, 207, 232), discusses architecture as well as literature, Tolstoi [sic] and Hamlet as well as French authors, undated.

6          12          [Nouvelle]. Untitled short story, 15 pages, possibly incomplete, undated.

6          13          [Grand Nouvelle]. Untitled story with a war theme, pages 2-46, signed, 1915 November.

6          14          [Paraguay]. Untitled description of Paraguay, with population figures for 1895-1899, 2 sketches and mentions Don Pedro Parecelsos several times, XIV pages, undated.

6          15          (Sur la Peinture). Untitled pages (2-6) on symbolism, aesthetics, mentions Mercure, 5 leaves, undated.

6          16          “Le Portrait de ma Mère.” “A mon Fils,” 2 pages on his mother’s portrait, 2 leaves, 1911 March 8-24.

6          17          “Pour la Justice et Pour la Liberte.” On Frenchmen accused of murdering Englishmen in the Dark Continent, brought English prisons and placed in French ones, mentions the crime commited at Filinqué on June 23, 1901. Pages 1-3, 7-13, 26-27 (not complete), undated.

6          18          “Précision provisoire de mes Principes, et de mes Croyances.” On harmony and destiny, 6 leaves. See also Untitled Fragments for pages on Morice’s own philosophy, style, [1908? April 8].

6          19          “Psychologie esthétique.” “Préliminaires: I 27 Octobre 1899... VII. 8 Decembre 1899.” Envelope (torn) containing 70 leaves of small paper (? from a small notebook). Series of notes for seven lessons, the first is labeled "Mallarmé", 1899.

6          20          “Randal à Sylva.” “Les Parfaites Amours,” in the form of letters from “Randal,” the first is written from “Calais, 2 Novembre.” The last, XVIII is from Nice, January 2; others, V-XII, are from London, November 16-December 8, no year (1883 written on outside), 28 leaves. Missing letters 2, 4, 6, 10, 11, 13, 15-17, circa 1883.

6          21          “Odilon Radon.” “Etude de Décembre,” 1 leaf. Radon (1840-1916) was a French painter and illustrator associated with Symbolisme, undated.

6          22          “Odilon Radon.” “Maîtres anciens et nouveaux,” 1 leaf, undated.

6          23          Untitled Story. “La scène se passe Ailleurs,” 15 pages, no date.

6          24          “La Renaissance.” “Prologe,” 5 pages (6 leaves), 1902 May 18-June 8.

6          25          “Renan.” “Extraits de Renan; commentaires,” (l0] pages (11 leaves). Ernest Renan (1823-1892) was a Hebrew scholar, historian, philologist and critic, born in Brittany, undated.

6          26          “Renan.” “Le nouveau Prêtre de Némi,” 3 pages (5 leaves), undated.

6          27          “Renan.” “La Pensée de Renan et la Guerre,” 20 leaves, undated.

6          28          “Religion.” “Clamart, Examen de Conscience,” December 30, 1911-January 5, 1912, 2 leaves “Examen de Conscience, “February 4-6, 1906, 3 leaves. See Delsemme, page 15, for “Manuscrit inachevé,” “Responsabilité” termed “sorte d’examen de conscience”, 1906 February 4-6.

6          28          “Religion.” “Des Commentaires: Moi-Meme,” 4 pages (4 leaves) initialed “Ch. M”, 1912 March 7.

6          28          “Religion.” “Les Responsabilités,” 1 leaf, undated.

6          28          “Religion.” “Jugement de moi-même par moi--même,” 2 leaves, undated.

6          28          “Religion.” “VII. Mon cher ami,” pages 66-72, incomplete letter on religion, atheism, logic and reason, undated.

6          29          “Responsabilité.” “Manuscrit inachevé” listed by Delsemme, pages 15, [ii], 194 pages (195 leaves), (“Nous sommes en 1913,” [ii]), undated.

7          1          “Le Rêve de Vivre.” “VIII. La Bonne Route,” poem, 2 leaves, undated.

7          1          “Le Rêve de Vivre.” “Plan général,” 1 leaf, undated.

7          1          “Le Rêve de Vivre.” “Conseils esthétiques à moi-Même,” 3 leaves, [no year] June 5-16.

7          2          “Roman inconnu." A tale involving “la Comtesse de Sainte-Foi,” “La Commandant Larrey” of the Navy, the Italian tenor Bertuso, and others, discussing politics and leaving Paris for America, pages 2-26, undated but several pages headed June 26-July 6, 1911, undated.

7          3          “La Rouge et la Noire.” “La Vie au Palais,” 3 pages, and “Justice et Charité,” 3 pages (total 7 leaves), undated.

7          4          “Le Salut.” “IV. Le Salut,” pages 65-77 (13 leaves). Discusses America: In America, the dollar never resists a reasonable appeal... But... the American evil has too easily infected Europe and the world.” [France] is bound to America in gratitude and President Wilson has recorded this. “Today, M. Wilson declares to his compatriots, America is the hope of the world.” Morice protests this statement, undated.

7          5          “Le Testament d’Eléna Flamma.” A work not listed in Delsemme, 43 pages, undated.

7          6          “Tolstoy.” Incomplete discussion of Tolstoy, pages 5-12, for a conference?, undated.

7          7          Verlaine, Paul (1844-1896). “Répartition des Lectures” on Verlaine (1 leaf), undated.

7          7          Verlaine, Paul. 2 incomplete addresses: pages 7-14; pages 5-24, 30, undated.

7          8          Verlaine, Paul. “La glorie de Verlaine,” 11 pages, 1911 January 30.

7          9          Verlaine, Paul. “Argument et Plan,” 2 leaves, undated.

7          10          Verlaine, Paul. “Clartés Mystiques,” 6 pages, undated.

7          11          Verlaine, Paul. “Discours par l’inauguration du monument de Verlaine,” 5 pages. A volume, Hommage à Paul Verlaine Publié en vue de l’erection du monument, was published by Messein in 1910, Morice was a contributor, undated.

7          12          Verlaine, Paul. “L’Homme et l’oeuvre... Advertisement,” 2 pages, undated.

7          13          Verlaine, Paul. “Iconographie de Verlaine,” 3 pages, undated.

7          14          Verlaine, Paul. “Les Maîtres de l’art Vivant. Verlaine - Introduction,” 1 leaf, undated.

7          15          Verlaine, Paul. “Notre Tradition,” 2 leaves. For further information on Verlaine, see box 8, Dr. Marie-Georgette Steisel, “Verlaine re-visité par son premier critique: Extraits inédits de Charles Morice”Les Lettres françaises, #1278 (9-15 avril 1969), pages 3-4. See also Morice,  Paul Verlaine (Paris: Leon Varier, 1888), undated.

7          16          “La Vie et la Beauté.” “Nouveau Théâtre,” II, April 10, 1899 (26 leaves); III, April 21, 1899 (27 leaves), IV, May 1, 1899 (30 leaves). “La Vie Belle,” 6 leaves, undated, 1899, undated.

7          17          “La Vie et la Beauté.” 2 programs (printed), 1899 March 27 and April 10.

7          18          “Visions et Notations.” “Visions et Notations,” pages 1-39 (32 leaves, missing page 3, 4, 26, 30-31, 33-35, two page 28), Illustration on page 16, 1910 July 9-September 4.

7          19          “Visions at Songeries.” “Notations: En vivant, en lisant,” 36 leaves, variously paginated, undated but penciled note on inside of end leaf, ii (Mai 1906], undated.

7          20          Rodin, François Auguste-René (1840-1917). “A plusieurs reprises avant ce jour l’oeuvre de Rodin a été commenter, ici.” 10 leaves (incomplete), undated.

7          21          Rodin. Untitled manuscript. pages 4-17 (14 leaves), undated.

7          22          Rodin. “L’auteur revient parfois,” pages 2-17 (missing 4-5), 32, 37, 47, 92-94. “IV. La Mission de Rodin,” 11 pages. Morice wrote the Introduction to Rodin’s Les Cathédrales de France (Paris: A. Cohn, 1914); section IV of the Introduction is “La Mission de Rodin.” The first manuscript is part of the “Avertissement”, undated.

7          23          Les Cathédrales. “Introduction,” pages 1-46 (missing pages 7, 37, 40), undated.

7          24          Les Cathédrales. “Introduction,” pages 1-50 (missing page 32), 1910 November 14.

7          25          Les Cathédrales. “Initiation à l’art du moyen âge,” 4 pages (3 leaves). See chapter I, undated.

7          26          Les Cathédrales. “Notes sur le style roman,” 3 pages. See chapter III, undated.

7          27          Les Cathédrales. “Etamps,” 13 leaves. See chapter IV, undated.

7          28          Les Cathédrales. “Amiens,” 4 leaves. See chapter VII, 1907 July.

7          29          Les Cathédrales. "Le Mans," 7 pages. See chapter VIII, undated.

7          30          Les Cathédrales. “Chartres,” 13 leaves. See chapter XII, undated.

7          31          Les Cathédrales. “Dernier Chapitre,” 34 leaves. See chapter XIV, undated.

7          32          Les Cathédralea. “6 épreuves,” l20 pages, 1910 November 17.

7          33          Les Cathédrales. “Car la Terre toujours rêva du Ciel,” poem, 4 pages. See also Box 8, for oversized pageproofs of  Les Cathédrales de France and the published volume. See also Correspondence with the editors of Librairie Armand Colin, publisher, 1910 July 16-1911 September 5.

7          34          L’Action Humaine. “Première Année-No. 14, 2  me Quinzaine d’Août 1907,” a bimonthly publication under the direction of Charles Morice. 1 complete number (1 leaf, 4 printed page) and one with an article, “Commentaires du ‘Rêve de Vivre’” cut out, 1907.

7          35          “L’Etat.” Untitled pages of a manuscript, pages 17-72, on crime, undated.

7          36          “Notations.” 15 leaves, variously paginated. Some leaves are headed “travail ... Eugène Gaillard” and mention Renan, Discussion of “absolution”, undated.

7          37          “Quincaille.” “Déclaré: a ma chère Femme,” 1 leaf. “Le Livre paterique,” 1 leaf. Quincaille consists of poems and prose written before 1914 but only made public after his death in 1919, undated.

7          38          “La Revue des Armes.” “à Henri Bourrelier,” 4 typed pages, 1916 January 14.

8          1          Book of Poems. 103 pages, page 104 laid in a pocket taped to the inside of the rear cover, signed and dated December 4, 1897, on the inside of the front cover. The first poem, “A Paul Gauguin,” is dated November 19, 1894. Page 87 is dated December 8, 1893. Pages 82 and 84 contain poems “A Jules Chéretm,” 1889 and 1896. Page 70 is in memory of Cecil Standish; pages 68-69 are “A Daniel Baudbovy,” 1891; page 28 is “A Jean Moréas.” Page 24 is dedicated to Valentin Baudbovy, 1893. See also printed remarks from Daniel Baudbovy, 1893, 1897.

8          2          “Crime d’Amour.” “Poème chanté at dansé d’après Verlaine,” in three parts, printed with manuscript changes. 5 sets of page proofs, three have changes and additions, 1912 March.

8          3          Mannes, Henri, photographer. Photographic print, mounted, of Auguste Rodin. Paris. On mount, signed by Mannes and inscribed by Rodin: au Penseur, et à mon grand ami Morice. (Photo 67-1-1), undated.

8          4          Berger, Paul, photographer. (a) Photographic print, profile, of Charles Morice, mounted. Signed by Berger on mount. Circa World War I. (Removed from 1910 diary). (Photo 67-1-2), undated.

8          4          Berger, Paul, photographer. (b) Photographic print, full face, of young man in uniform (Albert Morice, Charles’ son?). Signed by Berger on mount. (Photo 67-1-3), undated.

8          5          Morice, Charles, subject. Photographic print, severely water damaged, sitting on chair. (Photo 67-1-4), [circa 1880s?].

8          5          Morice, Charles. Photographic print of a bust of Morice, with beard, 20th century (previously laid in 1910 diary). (Photo 67-1-5), circa 1900s.

8          6          “Verlaine re-visité par son premier critique.” Article, signed, by Marie-Georgette Steisel, in Les Lettres française, No. 1278, pages 3-4. Presented by Dr. Steisel to Mr. Tom Whitehead [Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts, Temple University, Paley Library], 1969 April 15.

8          7          “Verlaine et sa mère ...“ Copy of an article by Marie-Georgette Steisel, appearing in Les Lettres françaises, pages 5-6, 1970 August 5.

8          8          Les Cathédrales de France. First proofs of Introduction, 96 pages, 1910 December 9-10.

8          9          Les Cathédrales de France. Printed pages of Introduction, pages 23 and 35, undated.

8          10          Les Cathédrales de France. Page proofs, first, of the first chapter, “Initiation à l’art du moyen âge,” 113 pages, 1910 November 29-1911 July 24.

8          11          Les Cathédrales de France. Proofs of Introduction, 38 pages, 1911 September 7.

8          12          Les Cathédrales de France. Proofs, pages 9-64, 113-120, 1911 August 2-October 7.

8          13          Les Cathédrales de France. Third proofs, pages 1-64, 1911 October 14.

8          14          Untitled Galley Proofs. 20 leaves, pages 45—64. “Souvenirs d’un Meesin” appears as a heading on page 54; page 58 is headed “Croquis de Belgique; on page 63 someone wrote “Ouevres Posthumes”, undated.

8          15          “La Phalène des Iles de la Mer,” Proofs, 2 pages (1 leaf), of a poem by Morice to be published by F.M. Melchers in l’Estampe moderne, undated.

9          1          Fragments. “L’Avenue en habit d’hiver.” 1 leaf, poem, undated.

9          1          Fragments. “L’Avenue en habit d’hiver.” 2 leaves, pages 13-14, “On vu n’a point”, undated.

9          1          Fragments. “L’Avenue en habit d’hiver.” 4 leaves, pages 23-26, discusses Jules Verne, science, Goëthe, and other topics, undated.

9          2          Fragments. “Hygiene.” 4 leaves, pages 10-13, on hygiene, thrift and philanthropie, undated.

9          3          Fragments. “Le Rêve de Hellmé” (?) 13 leaves, pages 2-13, 23. On human thought and conscience, 1906 April 26-May 16,.

9          4          Fragments. “La Religion Naturelle.” 9 leaves, pages 249-257, undated.

9          5          Fragments. “Myth: Empire essential de la Poësie.” 17 e leçon, 5 leaves. On Greek and Roman writers, undated.

9          6          Fragments. “L’Album de Linden.” “à Madame M.O. Landrien,” 5 leaves, undated.

9          7          Fragments. “Au vent de la colére.” 14 leaves, each headed differently. “Decembre,” “Jardine Publies,” “Juger,” variously dated (page 139 or 1 leaf has date, Bruxelles, December 20, 1896 crossed out), February 7-April 6, 1923. See also folder 17, box 9 for verses on a similar theme, [1923?].

9          8          Fragments. “Bouquets.” 8 leaves, with different headings: “A une jeune Malade,” “A Valentin Baud-Bovy.” (third leaf is headed “Sonnet de novembre 1898”), undated.

9          9          Fragments. “Chansons Claires.” 4 leaves, headed. “VI-Chansons Claires" but numbered XII, XV, XVIII, and XX, undated.

9          10          Fragments. “Livre publié.” 9 leaves, 1901 September 13-19, 1903 February 16-March 23.

9          11          Fragments. “Livret de gaîtés.” 4 leaves, 1903 April 5-May 23.

9          12          Fragments. “Les Regards, du bord de la mer.” 3 pages (3 leaves), undated.

9          13          Fragments. “La Paix par l’Industrie.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          14          Fragments. “Le Rideau de Pourpre.” 15 leaves, some dated 1903. Page headed “Albert” is in “Paroles à mon Fils” in Rideau manuscript, undated, 1903.

9          15          Fragments. “Sans hâte.” 3 leaves, undated.

9          16          Fragments. “Souvenirs.” 9 leaves, variously paginated, undated.

9          17          Fragments. “Los Tribunaux.” 20 leaves. Pages I-XIV have titles with legal aspects, e.g. III: Paroles à l’Accusé, X: La Prison. See also folder 7, box 9, for verses on a similar theme, undated.

9          18          Fragments. “Vers de Jeunesse.” 24 leaves, variously paginated, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Ailes.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ames Mortes.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “L’Archiduc Et La Princess.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Au Retour.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Aurons Bruillés.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Aux Femmes." 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ballade De L’An Neuf.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ballade Pour Definir La Sincérité.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Berceuse." 2 leaves, 1897.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Le Boulevard.” Pages 169-170 (2 leaves), undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Bouquets Funéraires.” 2 leaves. One poem, “En Memoire de Cecil Standish,” also appears in “Le Rideau de Pourpre”, 1899.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Bouissons De La Route.” 3 leaves, 1903 April 4, 5.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “César.” 1 leaf inside fold of “César: Majesté is Roture & sire l’Etiquette”, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Coquette.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Deux Vieilles Lunes.” 3 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Dix Ans.” 2 leaves, 1901 September 1-1902 January 1.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “En Donnant Mon Portrait, Autrefois.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Fleur.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Le Hibou.” Pages 131-132; 2 pages (1 leaf), “Nocturnes XVII”, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “L’Huission.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “L’Hymme à L’Epée, Sans Solitude.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Intérieur, Preservation.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Larmes Dans L’ Aurore." 5 leaves, variously paginated, 1901.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Lendemain.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Loquetage.” 3 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Melodies contestantes.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Parfuns D’Occident.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Pour Des Noces D’Argent.” 2 leaves, Bruxelles, 1900 October 9.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Pour Mon Portrait.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Le Premier Mai 1905.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Prose Pour Dire La Couleur De Mon Ame.” 4 leaves, 1918 September.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Qu’il En Soit Fait Ainsi,” 2 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Quarante Ans. 6 leaves, with small label: Vers de très jeune homme”, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Réalism.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Auguste Rodin.” 4 leaves, with dates “En Belgique”, 1900.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Soleils Et Lunes.” Page 24, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Souvenir à Geutbrugge.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Sphinx Et Les Eaux.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Statues Futures.” 2 leaves, duplicate (one is one line longer), undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Tableaux De La Ville.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Terre.” 3 leaves, 1908.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Trois Mesures pour rien.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Une Voix.” 2 pages 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Variations Lyriques.” “Prelude,” 1 leaf, undated.

9          19          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Ville Modern.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Abdique L’Aprés Orgueil, Mon Coeur, Qui te Fatigue.” 2 pages 1 leaf, note added “ancien vers avant 1890”, 1890.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ainsi Les Arbres Dans La Forêt.” Pages 101-102 (2 leaves), undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Attend Au Plus Tête La Liberté Du Travail.” Page 46 (1 leaf), undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Au Bois De La Cambre.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Aux Heures De Disert, Quand La Grande Douleur.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Aux Heures De Fatigue Et Tout En Poursuivant.” Dedicated to Edmond Rostand. Pages 31-37 (7 leaves), undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Avec Du Vent Dans Mes Cheveux.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Bruits De Rire Et De Sanglets, Plainte Profonde.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “C’est Au Faubourg Des Fleurs, Qui Chante L’Oiseau D’or.” 2 pages (1 leaf), undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “C’est Pour L’ Enchantement D’un Long Après-Midi.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Car Je Suis, Mon Seigneur, Ton Prince Et Ton Prêtre, Vint.” 1 leaf, verses labeled 5-8, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Celui Qui S’en Allait Autrefois Sur La Mer.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Cependent Je Regard Et Ecoute Et J’ai Peur,” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). Ah! Ces Messieurs En or Qui se Croient Elégants! 1 leaf, autobiographical, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ciel Sans Images, Une Tristesse.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). "Dans L’Ocean De Mes Ténèbres.” 1 leaf, Paris, 1895 July 27.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). "Dans Les Brouillards, Le Soir, Des Yeux Inquietants.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Devant L’Essord Premier De Anges Que Nous Fumes.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Dis Lorsque De Mon Coeur La Grâce Sa Fait Prise.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Doux LiLas.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Du Sommet De Ma Vie Ardemment Je Contemple.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Ennemis Etaient Nombreux, Forts, Bien Armés.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “L’Epouse Aux Yeux Pensifs, Au Front Grave Et Candide.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Et Nous N’Avona Pas Eu De Jour, Pas De Midi." 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Et Si Persuasif Est L’Aspect Inviteur.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Fleur Vivante à Qui tu te Complais à Plaire." 2 leaves, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Forêt Qui Marche Et Qui Chante.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Frère Qui Pensait Apprendre De Moi.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “L’Immémorial Fausse En Habit De Notaire.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “J’Ai Ce Don, Trente Fois Son Quarante, Ou Que J’Aille.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “J’Ai Peur De Regarder Dans Mon Ame, J’ai Honte.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “J’Ai Vu Se Lever L’Aube Sur La Plaine.” 1 leaf, [no year] August 9.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Je Ne Sais Quel Entrepreneur.” 1 leaf, signed by Charles Morice, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Je Pense Dans Mon Coeur - Vaniteuse Raison.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Le Jour En Marchant.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Bas Sur Des Feunis(?) Dociles.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Moi, Une Gosse, Et Lui, Une Facon D’Apôtre. . .“ 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ni L’Epouse, Ni la Maitrease, Ni L’Ami.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Nous Sommes Les Vaisseaux Maudits.” 4 leaves (variously paginated), undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “O, Madame, C’est D’un Café Second Empire.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “O, Si Blanches Avec Vos Grands Veux Emouvant.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “O Tout Est Pluriel, - Moi Qui Suis Singulier!” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Plaines Dilentes Du Soir.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Pour L’Embarquement Vers Les Jamais, Les Toujours.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Pour Te Béssir, Ce Grand Matin, Ce Sont Les Mains.” 1 leaf. Third verse begins “O mon Fils bien aimé, mon Albert,...“, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Pour Troubler Du Reflect De Sa Face.” 5 leaves, variously numbered, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Prétentieux Teniers Plus Altiers Que Des Temples.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Quand J’Etais Jeune Fille.” 1 leaf, 1903 June 4.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Quand Nous Serons De Purs Esprits.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Que N’Ai - Je Laissé Chanter Ma Jeunesse.” 2 leaves, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Les Rideaux En Dentelle Vieille.” 11 pages. (3 leaves), signed by Charles Morice, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Sens Epanouis! Et Leurs Ecloses!” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Silma De La Terre Au Bord Des Flots Du Soir.” 2 leaves, 1906 August 8.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “La Soleil Fait Semblant D’être Blanc..." 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Un Spectre Dens La Nuit, Un Mort Agité, Moi,” “2 e Partie,” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Tes Mots Familiers Tans Ces Salons De Gala.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Tu N’es Les Almanachs Ni lea Anthologies.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Verlaine, Bauville, Villon,” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Versait Du Raide à Ces Jaunes Qui, En Vrâiment.” 3 leaves, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Vous N’Allez, Si Loin Qua Pour Revenir.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          20          Miscellaneous poems (with titles). “Ange, Est-Ce La Mort Charitable,” 2 pages (1 leaf), [no year] January 30.

9          21          “Le Rideau de Pourpre.” Manuscript of book of poems published posthumously by Messein of Paris, 1921. 244 leaves, variously paginated and dated. Dedicated to Albert Louis Charles Morice, 1901-1914.

9          22          Announcements and Programs. 5 manuscript leaves, notes on the reverse of printed announcements of “Histoire de la Poésie Française. Dix Leçons par Charles Morice... depuis 4 Novembre 1916.” Notes are on the Middle Ages, literature and art, 1916 November 4.

9          22          Announcements and Programs. “Exposition Paul Gauguin,” Galerie Ambroise Vollard, Paris (4 pages, 1 leaf), [no year] November 4-28.

9          22          Announcements and Programs. “A la Gloire des Van Eyck Fête d’Art,” with opening words and preface by Morice (3 pages 1 leaf), in French and German, 1898 April 15.

9          23          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Le Mot Progrès.” 5 leaves, text of a lecture?, undated.

9          24          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Introduction.” pages 1—4, “L’Art = la Vie”, undated.

9          25          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Hèraclés.” “15 eme leçon: Beauté chez les Héros-Hèreclés,” pages 1-2, undated.

9          26          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Analogies.” “La contiment, VI,” pages 2-l3, signed; page 8 has heading: “Le But et le Chemin”, post 1899.

9          26          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Analogies,” pages 2-6 (extra page 3, 6 leaves), undated.

9          27          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Les Causes.” “la vie primitive” (page 7), philosophy, literature, Christianity, pages [l]-24, undated.

9          28          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. Autographs. Page of autographs, reverse of letter head: “Taverne Gruber & Cie, Paris.” Includes 27 names, e.g. Heléne Porgès, Rene de Chavagnes, Henri Dagan, Georges Le Cardonnel, and Alfred Mortier as well as Charles Morice, undated.

9          29          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Nous tombons.” "... au point le plus dangereux de cette étude,” 3 pages, part II. Discusses religion, justice and Moses, undated (post 1906).

9          30          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Mon style.” “Ma prose,” 4 leaves, undated.

9          30          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Mon style.” “Mon Unité,” 1 leaf, undated.

9          30          Untitled Manuscript Fragments. “Mon style.” “Mes Régles de critique Litteraire.” 1 leaf, undated.

9          31          Unsorted Fragments. 48 leaves, variously paginated. Some titled: “Les Grandes Choices,” “Grands Visages,” “Architectural: Symphonéque,” and “La Musique des Vers”, undated.

9          32          Unsorted Material. 107 leaves, variously paginated and dated “Je ne puis me rappeler avec précision, -me dit il,” pages 3-51 (missing pages 43-46); “Moses,” pages 1-6, “Idée,” pages 1-6, one page, June 30-July 25, 1911, of expenses, 1911-1915.