John T. McIntyre Papers, Series III: Published pulp appearances of short and long fiction

Collection ID: 
Record Group

Published Short Stories: Pulp Periodical Issues and Tear Sheets of McIntyre fiction arranged by title;
and two 
Bound volumes of stories including, both sections including pseudonymous authorship.

“A One-Two for Nate.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by F.S.Humiston.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 40-49.  First line: Dan Brophy came down to the camp one day while I was training . . .”

“A Short Shot at Purdy.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Chas Wood.]  In: Short Stories.  October 10, 1948.  pp. 28-39.  First line: “The contract had read that there was to be a thousand dollars for the winner . . .”

“Afar from Elsinore.”  By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Hanson Booth].  In: ??  [n.d.]  pp. 431-444.  First line:  “A subdued chant arose in the Fourth.”  (4 copies). 

“Ahead of the Drums.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by W. Glackens.]  In Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly.  [n.d.].  pp. 422-427.  First line: “A door directly across the way flew open . . .”  (2 copies, 1 in ‘Bindings of Multiple Stories, vol. 2’).

“At Hasting’s Junction.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  [n.d.].  pp. 1071-1078.  First line: “The train was one of those great glaring affairs that come out of the West . . .”  (See Bindings of Multiple Stories Vol. 2).

“At Ten Forty-Six.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  October 1946.  Vol. 83, no. 6.  Pp.76-77.  First line: “Spencer had looked at the clock in his office shortly before this . . .”

“At the Twenty-Ninth Floor.”  By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustration by F.S. Humiston Jr.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp 144-153. First line:  “The big steel job, rearing like magic on the east side of the river . . .” 

“At Two Eight.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by John Fulton].  In: Blue Book Magazine.  February 1946.  Vol. 82, no. 4.  pp 2-5.  First line: “Amos Smite sat on the edge of his bed.” 

“Beaumarchais: Friend of America.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Popular Biography.  December 1929.  Vol. 1, no. 2.  pp. 31-45.  First line: “It has repeatedly been said that republics are ungrateful . . .” 

“Blackmail.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Manning de V. Lee.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  June 1944.  Vol. 79, no. 2.  pp. 51-57.  First line: “The telephone buzzed and Jerry Mooney took it up.” 

“Blindfolded.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  Pages cut from 2 copies of “Blows in the Dark” (see below) and pasted into new binding under this new title and author.  First line: “Midday fell upon the sun-bleached mountains that ridge Southern California . . .” 

“Blowing Weather.”  (Illustration “removed 990920 from ‘The Vance’ copy of Blowing Weather (1923)).  Caption: “‘The man’s mad!’ Anthony told himself.  ‘I was a fool to give heed to him in the first place.’” 

“Blows in the Dark.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustration by Leo Morey.]  In:

Complete Detective Novel Magazine.  November 1931.  No. 41.  pp. 8-84.  First line: “Midday fell upon the sunbleached mountains that ridge Southern California . . .”  (A revision of In the Dead of Night, 1908, Philadelphia: Lippincott.  See “Blindfolded” above).

“Bound to Get Home.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  [n.d.].  pp.  646-650.  First line: “I had a letter from Smiler Conroy the other day . . .”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories vol. 2). 

“The Cartridge Kid.”  By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated].  In:  Short Stories. [n.d.] pp. 135-171.  First line: “Desert Rim stood on the spot where the sands touched the foot of the Solomon range . . .” 

“Corrigan’s Floating Rib.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 86-91.  First line: “‘Stenzler,’ says Cuddy, to me . . .”  (See bindings of Multiple Stories, vol. 2). 

“Dorgan Comes Back.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  (On page 67 there is also a notice for his “The Fence Breakers.”)  First line: “There was one long, lifting roar . . .”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”). 

“Doubles and Quits.”  (“Complete Novel”) by MacBurney Gates.  In: Brief stories Magazine.  September 1924.  pp. 3-39.  First line: “It was in the lobby of the Great Southern Hotel, New Orleans.”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, vol. 1).

“Duddington Delivers the Tangerines.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Periodical not identified].  pp. 80-93.  First line: “While Duddington Pell Chambers dressed that morning . . .”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories vol. 2”).

“Eyes of Darkness.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 3-11.  First line: “Wu Ming crossed the room with hushed tread . . .”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories. Vol. 2”). 

“The Fence Breaker.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 67-81.  First line:  “There was a short right-field fence at our ballpark . . .”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”).  

“The Five Mile Stretch.”  [An Ashton-Kirk Story.] By John T. McIntyre.  In: McBride’s Magazine.  pp. 100-110.  First line: “It is possible that I’d never have become acquainted with Ashton-Kirk . . .”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2.”). 

“For the Glory of Monsignor.”  [A Riley and Hopkins Story.].  [Illustrated by E.N.C.]  By John T. McIntyre.  In: ??  [n.d.].  pp.  247-259.  First line: “A barb of sunlight entered at a tall, stained-glass window . . .”  (2 copies). 

“Girard: Merchant and Mariner.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.].  In: Popular Biography.  November 1929.  Vol. 1, no. 1.  pp.  4-17.  First line: “When stout and good-natured Jean Couteau walked to and fro on the deck of his ship . . .” (Biography of Stephen Girard). 

“Goose McGonnagle’s Diplomacy.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Otto Lang.]  In: Iroquois: A Modern Magazine.  October 3, 1897.  pp. 17-23.  First line: “It was early one Sunday morning, and McGarrigal’s Alley was quiet and still . . .” 

“Green Ice.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Gustavson].  In: ??  pp. 117-144.  First line: “Jerry Mooney shot upward in one of the high-speed elevators of the Etruria Tower.”  (A loose sheet in the same folder bears the title, “Trouble Walks in on Mooney,” also “by Kerry O’Neil”).

“Greenbaum’s Kelly.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 9-14.  First line: “Greenbaum carried on an antique business in a good street.”  (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”).

“Hack Coogan Buys a Gun.”  By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.].  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 95-99.  First line: “Hack Coogan had spotted the place about two days before.” (See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”).

“The Hand of Glory.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Sidney Riesenberg.  In: The Philadelphia Record Sunday Magazine.  May 9, 1915.  pp. 3-4, 18-19.  First line: “The clerks and patrons had already gone . . .”  (2 copies, of which 1 is in oversize filing). 

“Hauling West.” [Part 1 of 4.]  By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  October 1942.  Vol. 75, no. 6.  pp. 2-21.  First line: “A tall, bronzed young man on an old roan horse rode up the dusty turnpike . . .” (3 copies).

“Hauling West.” [Part 2 of 4.]. By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  November 1942.  Vol. 76, no. 1.  pp. 86-106.  First line: “‘You are a stranger here, I think,’ said the landlord.”  (3 copies).

“Hauling West.” [Part 3 of 4.]. By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  December 1942.  Vol. 76, no. 2.  pp. 54-74.  First line: “From back in Pennsylvania.”  (1 copy.) 

“Hauling West.” [Part 4, conclusion.] By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  January 1943.  Vol. 76, no. 3.  pp. 95-109.  First line: “Young Denis Abernathy had come out of the West . . .”  (3 copies.)  (For this and the previous 3 entries, see under “O Land of Milk and Honey”).

“Heralds of Conquest.”  “A Story in Four Parts.”  Part I.  By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 100-127.  First line: “The United States flag flew over the Army and Navy building . . .”  (2 copies: one in “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 1). 

“Heralds of Conquest.”  Part II. By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 64-88.  First line: “The Russian’s Chips were counted, and a note made of the amount . . .”

“Heralds of Conquest.”  Part III. By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 106-134. First line: “Dick Shannon, with the words of President Peixoto well in mind . . .”

“Heralds of Conquest.”  Part IV. By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 58-87. First line: “As Shannon watched, he saw the girl lift a hand and point at the man inside the window.”  (For this and the previous 3 entries, see “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 1).

 “Hipplewait Breaks His Bat.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated].  In: Short Stories.  [n.d].  pp. 46-54.  First line: “‘I think we got a chance for the flag,’ said Cuddy to me.” 

“Hired at San Pedro.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated].  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 58-67.  First line: “How often,” said Talk Tanner, “Have I told you to keep away from cards?” 

“His Back to the Sea.” [Part 4 of 4.]. By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by John Fulton.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  May 1944.  Vol. 79, no. 1.  pp. 61-81.  First line: “The peddler Tavish Abernathy and his fifteen-year-old son Simon were driven by a storm to shelter.”  (See “O Land of Milk and Honey” for the other 3 parts, as well as another copy of this entry).

“How Tommy Landed the Goods.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated].  In: ??  [n.d.].  pp. 522-527.  First line: “A good looking, well-built young man attired in the newest cut of clothes . . .” (4 copies). 

“Kelly and the Strange God.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 67-76.  First line: “Kelly was passing the church.”  See “Bindings on Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”). 

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  vol. 49, no. 4.  October, 1923.  pp. 2-20.  First line: “Of two pictures, here is the first . . .” 

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  November 1923. vol. 49, no. 5.  pp. 31-48.  First line: “Toward Espirito Santo, outpost on the border . . .” 

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.   December 1923. vol. 49, no. 6.  pp. 101-115.  First line:  “In the Hotel Europe in the City of Mexico . . .”

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  January 1924. vol. 50, no. 1.  pp. 133-162.  First line: “Romance in the old Mexico City of the late sixties!”  (This and the 3 previous entries, “Kildare of the Border,” are bound together with clips, covered by the cover of the October 1923 issue of Everybody’s; each is marked in pencil with corrections).

“Kildare of the Border.”  Same four installments as above, bound in “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 1.”

“Kildare of the Border.”  Four entire issues (i.e., those containing the installments listed above) of Everybody’s Magazine, bound by the publisher for presentation to McIntyre.  

“The Lottery Ticket.”  By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Walter de Maris.].  In: ??  pp. 90-96.  First line: “It was cool and pleasant under Clancy’s awning . . .” 

(4 copies.  Tear sheets). 

“The Man Who Forgot Three Years.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Blue Book Magazine.  1942 (from 2 issues of unknown date).  pp. 2-19, 84-119.  First line (from page 2): “As Jimmy Smith stepped along the street . . .”  First line (from page 84): “Yesterday had been a day in the late winter of 1936.”  (Two installments separated from two issues of Blue Book Magazine and bound together.  3 copies.  Pasted into the inside of the cover of each are McIntyre’s photo and biographical information, presumably from one of the issues of Blue Book in which this story was published).

“Mooney in a Bad Corner.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Charles Chickering.]. In: Blue Book Magazine.  March 1945, vol. 80, no. 5.  pp.  98-105.  First line: “Jerry Mooney had been working on the tag end of a forgery case . . .” 

“Mooney Makes with Murder.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by John Fulton.].  In:  Blue Book Magazine.  September 1943.  Vol. 77, no. 5.  pp. 108-144.  First line: “Jerry Mooney sat in his inner office in the Etruria Tower . . .”  (2 copies, the other of which is listed under “Pooch (and Sundry Other People)” by John T. McIntyre, published in the same issue).

“Mooney’s in a Jam.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Robert W. Crowther.].  In: The Philadelphia Inquirer, Gold Seal Novel Section, October 15, 1944.  First line: “Mickey always said the music at Philadelphia’s The Algerian Moon was just dandy.”  (Shorter, slightly different version of the next entry of the same title. 2 copies).

“Mooney’s in a Jam.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Ladson.]  In: ??  [n.d.]  pp. 121-180.  First line: “Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was just dandy.”  (Longer, slightly different version of the previous entry of the same title.  6 copies, all removed from published issue and bound in paper by the author).

“Murder is Stupid.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Gustavson.].  In: Blue Book Magazine.  December 1944.  Vol. 80, no. 2.  pp. 110-119.  First line: “The thousand eyes of the Etruria Tower were, one by one, winking out that evening...”

“Night Fares.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by F.S. Humiston Jr.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 139-147.  First line:  “I’m sitting in the breakfast nook taking my coffee, and the wife is talking.”  (2 copies).

“No. 6 Pentagon Terrace.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by L.R.Gustavson.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  February 1945.  Vol. 80, no. 4.  pp. 128-144.  First line: “The cab sloshed through the water and up to the curb, and stopped.” 

“O Land of Milk and Honey: A Romance Dealing with Early American Transportation.” By John T. McIntyre.  8 parts, of which 4 are published as “His Back to the Sea” and 4 as “Hauling West.”  All 8 removed from their original magazines (i.e. Blue Book Magazines) and bound together.  On the first page of the first installment of “His Back . . .” and “Hauling West,” there is a typed label, pasted in, reading, “This is Part [1 or 2] of “O land of Milk and Honey.” 

“His Back to the Sea.”  Part 1 of 4. By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by John Fulton.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  February 1944.  pp. 2-23.  First line: “The shebeen, as David Melody called his tavern . . .” 

“His Back to the Sea.”  Part 2 of 4.  Same.  March 1944.  pp. 86-107.  First line (background information): “The peddler Tavish Abernathy and his son Simon . . .”

“His Back to the Sea.”  Part 3 of 4.  Same.  April 1944.  pp. 38-61. First line (background information): “When the peddler Tavish Abernathy and his son Simon . . .”

“His Back to the Sea.”  Part 4 of 4.  Same.  May 1944.  pp. 61-81. First line (background information): “When the peddler Tavish Abernathy and his fifteen-year-old son Simon . . .”  (See under “His Back to the Sea” for another copy of this installment). 

“Hauling West.” [Part 1 of 4.]  By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  October 1942.  Vol. 75, no. 6.  pp. 2-21.  First line: “A tall, bronzed young man on an old roan horse rode up the dusty turnpike . . .”

“Hauling West.”  [Part 2 of 4.].  Same.  November 1942.  Vol. 76, no. 1.  pp. 86-106.  First line: “‘You are a stranger here, I think,’ said the landlord.” 

“Hauling West.”  [Part 3 of 4.].  Same.  December 1942.  Vol. 76, no. 2.  pp. 54-74.  First line: “From back in Pennsylvania.”

“Hauling West.”  [Part 4, conclusion.]  Same.  January 1943.  Vol. 76, no. 3.  pp. 95-109.  First line: “Young Denis Abernathy had come out of the West . . .”  (For this and 3 previous entries see under “Hauling West.” 

“One Dozen: Soft: Size Eighteen.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Periodical not identified.].  pp. 80-93.  First line: “While Duddington Pell Chambers dressed that morning . . .” (See: “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”).

"Peril: Another Kaye Macy Adventure Story."  By John McIntyre.  In: MacFadden Weekly.  November 3, 1934.  Pages 16, 19.  First line: "There was a quiet ring at the apartment bell."  [See also in Oversize Material Box].

“Pickering’s Wax Lady.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  April 1909.  pp. 1292-1295.  First line: “Pickering was on his was to lunch . . .”  (2 copies, one of which is in “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2”).

“Please the Customers.” By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  October 10, 1943.  pp. 86-129.  First line: “Bill Riggs liked the excitement manifested throughout the Waltz-Dream arena . . .”

"Plunder: A Kaye Macy Adventure Story."  By John McIntyre.  In: MacFadden Weekly.  October 27, 1934.  Pages 14, 16.  First line: "The night was cold and the doorway gave Chubby…"  [See also in Oversize Material Box].

“Pooch (and Sundry Other People).”  Part 1 of 3. By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Chickering.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  July 1943.  Vol. 77, no. 3.  pp. 14-28.  First line: “The dog-shop was on Main Street . . .”

“Pooch (and Sundry Other People).”  Part 2 of 3.  Same.  August 1943.  Vol. 77, no. 4.  pp. 110-122.  First line: “When Michael reached the dog shop after the recovery of Honey . . .”

“Pooch (and Sundry Other People).”  Part 3 of 3.  Same.  September 1943.  Vol. 77, no. 5.  pp. 62-74.  First line: “ October passed with flurries of wind and dried leaves.”  (2 copies: the other is listed here under “Mooney Makes with Murder” by Kerry O’Neil, published in the same issue).

"Roulette!"  By John McIntyre.  In: MacFadden Weekly.  November 17, 1934.  Pages 14-16.  First line: "The Strains of music came up the magnificent old staircase…"

“The Romeo and Juliet of McGarrigal Alley.”  By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Chap-Book.  Vol. IX, No. 1, May 15, 1898.  pp. 22-26.  First line: “Oh we’re frinds to our frinds, an’ we’re foes to our foes.”  (In oversize filing). 

“Saddle Bums.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 112-131.  First line: “There was a sharp, shocking sound, followed by a long whine.”  (Tearsheets.)  (2 copies).

“Six-Guns on Spyglass.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 68-100.  First line: As the big Gregory truck . . .”  (2 copies.  Tearsheets)

“Skibby Signs Two.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp.  52-59.  First line: “It’s on March 8th and I get a wire from Danburg.” 

“Snapping Them Down.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 95-100.  First line: “Skibby’s piecing out the end of the season managing the Striped Sox . . .” 

“Stepping Ahead of Eddie.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Raymond Sisley.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  April 1945.  Vol. 80, no. 6.  pp. 114-119.  First line: When Jerry Mooney let himself into his office in the Etruria Tower . . .” 

“The Story of Stephen Collins Foster.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Popular Biography.  March 1930.  Vol. 1, no. 5.  pp. 19-32.  First line: “Some half dozen years ago, a famous ‘Tin Pan Alley’ song smith . . .”

“The Talking Horse.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: ??  [n.d.]  pp.  48-53.  First line: “Upon a fence across the way was posted . . .”  (3 copies.  Tearsheets). 

"Thieves in the Night." [This story is not in the Collection, but contract records in the Collection show that it was published in the November 10, 1934 issue of MacFadden Weekly.

“The Three Wise Men.”  By John T. McIntyre.  In: The American Short Story.  March, 1930.  pp. 41-53.  Vol. 1, no. 5.  First line: “Riley and Hopkins sat in a niche in the back wall of the church . . .”  (2 copies). 

“The Three Wise Men.”  By John T. McIntyre.  [publication not identified.]  [n.d.]  pp. 551-560.  (The test is the same as in the previous entry.)  See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2.”

“The Tramp’s Pug Passenger.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  December 1941.  Vol. 74, no.2.  pp. 53-59.  First line: “Captain Earnest Potwa, of the New Orleans steam ‘bum’ Meteor, . . .” 

“A Turn Over for Tony.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by Chas Wood.]  In: Short Stories.  March 25, 1948.  pp. 90-115.  First line:  “Shorty Kane was standing at the door . . .”  (3 copies).

“Twice Dead.”  By Kerry O’Neil.  [Illustrated by John Fulton.]  In: Blue Book Magazine.  October 1944.  Vol. 79, no. 6.  pp. 105-125.  First line: “The gray morning dripped its moisture into the streets.” 

“The Vanished Chauffer.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  October, 1948.  Vol. 7, no. 6.  pp. 1153-1198.  First line: “The big white motor-car slid up to the front of the ‘Ladle and Lamp’ just as the November night was falling.”  See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2.” 

“The Vanished Forty-Two.”  “An Ashton-Kirk Story.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 435-444.  First line: “That February night was the bitterest in my experience.”  See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2.” 

“What Passed in the Mist.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: The Popular Magazine.  [n.d.]  pp. 84-88.  First line: “There was a steady, drizzling rain and the fire escape was slippery . . .”  See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2.” 

“When Moscowitz Lost His Hop.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 89-94.  First line: “During the sixth inning I was up in the grandstand . . .”  See “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2.”

“The Yellow Violin.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Arthur [Z.? M.? Y.?] Dove.]  In: ??  [n.d.]  pp. 249-254.  First line: “‘I wonder,’ said Bat Scanlon, ‘if this fellow Ysaye . . .’”  (2 copies). 
 

Bindings of Multiple Stories.  (Story appearances clipped and bound by McIntyre). Listed in Order Bound. Two volumes, each with binder’s title: Brief Stories Magazine.  (Story titles are also listed alphabetically in above list).

 

Volume 1:

“Sharp Work.”  By MacBurney Gates.  (“Complete Book-Length Novel.”)  In: Brief Stories Magazine.  [n.d.]  pp. 3-90.  First line: “Kenyon ate the good little dinner . . .”  First chapter heading: “The Girl in the Limousine.”

 “Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  vol. 49, no. 4.  October, 1923.  pp. 2-20.  First line: “Of two pictures, here is the first . . .” 

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  November 1923. vol. 49, no. 5.  pp. 31-48.  First line: “Toward Espirito Santo, outpost on the border . . .” 

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  December 1923. vol. 49, no. 6.  pp. 101-115.  First line:  “In the Hotel Europe in the City of Mexico . . .”

“Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.].  In:  Everybody’s.  January 1924. vol. 50, no. 1.  pp. 133-162.  First line: “Romance in the old Mexico City of the late sixties!” 

“Doubles and Quits.”  (“Complete Novel”) by MacBurney Gates.  In: Brief stories Magazine.  September 1924.  pp. 3-39.  First line: “It was in the lobby of the Great Southern Hotel, New Orleans.” 

“Heralds of Conquest.”  “A Story in Four Parts.”  Part I.  By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 100-127.  First line: “The United States flag flew over the Army and Navy building . . .”  (2 copies: one in “Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 1). 

“Heralds of Conquest.”  Part II. By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 64-88.  First line: “The Russian’s Chips were counted, and a note made of the amount . . .”

“Heralds of Conquest.”  Part III. By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 106-134. First line: “Dick Shannon, with the words of President Peixoto well in mind . . .”

“Heralds of Conquest.”  Part IV. By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 58-87. First line: “As Shannon watched, he saw the girl lift a hand and point at the man inside the window.”

Volume 2:

“Kelly and the Strange God.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 67-76.  First line: “Kelly was passing the church.”

“The Five Mile Stretch.”  [An Ashton-Kirk Story.] By John T. McIntyre.  In: McBride’s Magazine.  pp. 100-110.  First line: “It is possible that I’d never have become acquainted with Ashton-Kirk . . .”

“The Three Wise Men.”  By John T. McIntyre.  [publication not identified.]  [n.d.]  pp. 551-560.  (The test is the same as in the previous entry.)

“Ahead of the Drums.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by W. Glackens.]  In Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly.  [n.d.].  pp. 422-427.  First line: “A door directly across the way flew open . . .”

“Eyes of Darkness.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 3-11.  First line: “Wu Ming crossed the room with hushed tread . . .”

“Greenbaum’s Kelly.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 9-14.  First line: “Greenbaum carried on an antique business in a good street.”

“The Vanished Forty-Two.”  “An Ashton-Kirk Story.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 435-444.  First line: “That February night was the bitterest in my experience.”

“Hack Coogan Buys a Gun.”  By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.].  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 95-99.  First line: “Hack Coogan had spotted the place about two days before.”

“Duddington Delivers the Tangerines.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Periodical not identified.]  pp. 80-93.  First line: “While Duddington Pell Chambers dressed that morning . . .”

“One Dozen: Soft: Size Eighteen.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Periodical not identified.].  pp. 80-93.  First line: “While Duddington Pell Chambers dressed that morning . . .”

“What Passed in the Mist.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: The Popular Magazine.  [n.d.]  pp. 84-88.  First line: “There was a steady, drizzling rain and the fire escape was slippery . . .” 

“The Fence Breaker.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 67-81.  First line:  “There was a short right-field fence at our ballpark . . .”

“Dorgan Comes Back.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated.]  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.].  (On page 67 there is also a notice for his “The Fence Breakers.”)  First line: “There was one long, lifting roar . . .”

“The Bronze Badge.”  By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  I.  “The Adventure of the Pelican Club.”  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 59-64.  First line: “The first time I ever saw Cravath was at Bernard’s . . .” 

“The Bronze Badge.” II.  The Adventure of the Double Cross.” By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 98-102.  First line: “Cravath lived in a pretty suburban place . . .” 

“The Bronze Badge.”  III.  “The Adventure of Crosby’s June.” By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 92-98.  First line: “I had not yet arisen when Charlie Paterson came in.” 

“The Bronze Badge.”  IV.  “The Adventure of The Beautiful Lady.” By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 110-116.  First line: “When we left the cab stable . . .” 

“The Bronze Badge.”  V.  “The Adventure of the Hindoo Butler.” By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 107-112.  First line: “I called at Cravath’s a few nights later . . .” 

“The Bronze Badge.”  VI.  “The Adventure of the Swiss Professor.” By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 101-106.  First line: “One day about four in the afternoon . . .”

“The Bronze Badge.”  VII.  “The Adventure of the Lonely House.” By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 100-106.  First line: “One evening not long after the affair of the Swiss professor . . .”

“The Bronze Badge.”  VIII.  “The Adventure of the Merchant’s Trust.”  [Illustrated.] By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 78-84.  First line: “Cravath Stopped at my hotel about noon one day . . .”

“The Bronze Badge.”  IX.  “The Adventure of La Sultana.”  [Illustrated]. By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 102-108.  First line: “It was by the merest chance that I saw Cravath that morning.” 

“The Bronze Badge.”  X. (Conclusion.)  “The Adventure of the French Restaurant.” [Illustrated]. By MacBurney Gates.  (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  In: Brief Stories.  [n.d.].  pp. 99-106.  First line: “Of course I was not to win a lady fair . . .”

“Pickering’s Wax Lady.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  April 1909.  pp. 1292-1295.  First line: “Pickering was on his was to lunch . . .”

“When Moscowitz Lost His Hop.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 89-94.  First line: “During the sixth inning I was up in the grandstand . . .” 

“Corrigan’s Floating Rib.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: Short Stories.  [n.d.]  pp. 86-91.  First line: “‘Stenzler,’ says Cuddy, to me . . .”

“Bound to Get Home.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  [n.d.].  pp.  646-650.  First line: “I had a letter from Smiler Conroy the other day . . .”

“At Hasting’s Junction.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  [n.d.].  pp. 1071-1078.  First line: “The train was one of those great glaring affairs that come out of the West . . .”

 “The Vanished Chauffer.” By John T. McIntyre.  In: The Blue Book Magazine.  October, 1948.  Vol. 7, no. 6.  pp. 1153-1198.  First line: “The big white motor-car slid up to the front of the ‘Ladle and Lamp’ just as the November night was falling.”

 

Edited by McIntyre

 

American Short Story, The.  A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction.

New York, Nov. 1929-April 1930.  Volume I, issues 1-4 and 6 (multiple copies).  Issue no. 4 lists Wm. H. Kofoed as editor, while issue no. 6 is the first here listing McIntyre as editor.  In issue 6 is "Editorially Speaking" (pp. 91-96) by "The Editors."

 

Other published materials in the Collection of uncertain relationship:

“High Society of Crookdom” By C. Patrick Thompson.  Tear sheets: New York Herald Tribune Magazine, Sunday 26 July 1931, pp. 4-5, 24 (and some other pages – it looks as if the reason for the tear sheets was the “High Society” story).  

 

Published materials removed from the McIntyre Papers and placed elsewhere:

The Black Cat.  Boston, Shortstory Publishing Co.  Four issues:  January 1900, March 1902, July 1902, and January 1907.

Blue Book Magazine.  New York, McCall Corporation. Issue of March, 1949 (v.88, no. 5).

In Fact. An Antidote for Falsehood in the Daily Press.  Run of issues from no. 161 (v.8, no. 5, November 8, 1943) to no. 337 (v.14, no. 25, March 24, 1947).