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John Thomas McIntyre Papers

Collection ID

(SPC) MSS LT 062

Related Subject(s)

Collecting Area(s)

Description

Collection Summary

Title
John Thomas McIntyre Papers

Dates
1897-2006

Collection ID
(SPC) MSS LT 062  

Creator
McIntyre, John Thomas, 1871-1951
           
Quantity
26.5 linear feet (65 boxes) + 1 desk and 1 framed item

Repository
Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries

Language
Materials in English

Detailed Collection Information

Biographical Note

John McIntyre was born in Philadelphia and his entree into publishing came with some stories published in the Philadelphia Times and with his first novel, "The Ragged Edge," in 1902. McIntyre focused on the genre of social realism and the detective story, although he also wrote drama for the stage and film. His most well-known play, "A Young Man's Fancy," was produced by George C. Tyler in 1919. In 1932 McIntyre published an historical novel, "Drums in the Dawn," followed by his prize-winning "Steps Going Down." McIntyre was also known as an authority on the history of the dime novel.

Description of Collection

The papers of this American detective writer include a large number of published and unpublished manuscripts, correspondence, newspaper clippings, financial and legal documents, stories as they appeared in periodicals, and photographs. The collection includes manuscripts for McIntyre's published works such as "Slag," "Steps Going Down," and "Museum Murder," as well as his play, "A Young Man's Fancy," produced by George C. Tyler in 1919. McIntyre's work appears under the pseudonyms Kerry O'Neil and MacBurney Gates, as well as McIntyre. There is correspondence between McIntyre and George M. Cohan and Joseph E. Mallory, the administrator of his estate, and with Warner Bros. and Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation.

Organization and Arrangement

The collection is arranged into 4 series as follows:

Series 1: Personal Files and Documents, Estate Activity, Reviews of McIntyre’s Work, and Research Notes, 1908-2006, undated
            Subseries 1.1: Biographical/Personal Files, 1915-2006, undated
            Subseries 1.2: Writing Related Secondary Files, 1902-1950
            Subseries 1.3: Published Reviews of McIntyre Writings, 1906-1937, undated
            Subseries 1.4: Miscellaneous Research Notes, Notes Regarding Publishers and             Newspapers, Collected Clippings, and Scrapbooks, 1908-1943, undated
Series 2: Correspondence, 1941-1951, undated
Subseries 2.1: Relating to Prose Work, 1917-1950, undated
Subseries 2.2: Relating to Drama/Plays, 1924-1950, undated
            Subseries 2.3: Relating to Film, TV, Radio, 1936-1949
            Subseries 2.4: Relating to Dime Novel Collecting, 1914-1951
            Subseries 2.5: Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1934-1949
            Subseries 2.6: Personal Correspondence, 1935-1951, undated
Series 3: Published Pulp Appearances of Short and Long Fiction, 1897-1948, undated
Series 4: Manuscripts, 1923-1932, undated
            Subseries 4.1:  McIntyre (and Kerry O’Neil, pseudonym) Fiction, 1923, undated
            Subseries 4.2:  McIntyre Drama and Plays, Undated
            Subseries 4.3:  Unidentified Plays, Undated
            Subseries 4.4:  McIntyre Photoplays, Animated Films, and Verse, Undated
            Subseries 4.5:  McIntyre Non-Fiction, Undated
            Subseries 4.6:  McIntyre Unidentified Manuscripts, Undated 
                        Sub-subseries 4.6.1: Manuscripts Arranged Alphabetically by Speculative Title, Undated
                        Sub-subseries 4.6.2: Complete Sections of Manuscripts Missing the First Section, Undated
                        Sub-subseries 4.6.3: Incomplete Manuscripts Missing First Page, Undated
                        Sub-subseries 4.6.4: Unidentified Notes and Outlines, Undated
            Subseries 4.7: Manuscripts By Known Authors Other Than McIntyre, 1932, undated

Series 1 contains biographical and personal files of McIntyre, published reviews of his work, and research notes.

Series 2 contains correspondence with fiction and dramatic publishers, producers, actors, dime novel collectors and booksellers, and others. Arranged by category.

Series 3 contains published stories: Pulp Periodical Issues and Tear Sheets of McIntyre fiction arranged by title; and two Bound volumes of stories including, both sections including pseudonymous authorship.

Series 4 contains holograph manuscripts and typescripts of creative works. Arranged by category and title.

Patron Information

Catalog Record

A record for this collection is available in Diamond, Temple University’s online library catalog: http://diamond.temple.edu/record=b1610623~S12.

Research Access

Collection is open for research.

Collections Stored Off-Site

This collection may be housed off-site at the Library Depository, and require up to two business days to retrieve. Please review the finding aid and be prepared to identify specific materials to be retrieved. Contact the Special Collections Research Center in advance of your visit, so that materials may be relocated to the reading room for research.

Publication and Copyright Information

The John Thomas McIntyre Papers are the physical property of the Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries. Intellectual property rights, including copyright, belong to the authors or their legal heirs and assigns. Researchers are responsible for determining the identity of rights holders and obtaining their permission for publication and for other purposes where stated.

Preferred Citation

[Description and date of item], [Box/folder number], John Thomas McIntyre Papers, (SPC) MSS LT 062, Special Collections Research Center, Temple University Libraries, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Administrative Information         

Processing Information

Finding aid revised according to contemporary archival standards June 2017.

Index Terms

The following headings have been used to index the description of this collection in Temple University’s electronic catalog:

Personal/Family Names:
Cohan, George M. (George Michael), 1878-1942
Gates, Mac Burney
O'Neil, Kerry
Mallory, Joseph E.
McIntyre, John Thomas, 1871-1951

Corporate Names:
Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation.
Warner Bros. Pictures (1923-1967)

Subjects:
Detective and mystery stories, American
Dime novels
Social realism -- United States

Material Types:
Correspondence
Typescripts
Photographs

Inventory

Series 1: Personal Files and Documents, Estate Activity, Reviews of McIntyre’s Work, and Research Notes, 1908-2006, undated

Series 1 contains biographical and personal files of McIntyre, published reviews of his work, and research notes.

Subseries 1.1: Biographical/Personal Files, 1915-2006, undated

1          1          Accounts, bills, auction notes after McIntyre's death          1951, undated

1          2          Authors' Guild and Authors' League, Baseball Writers Association of America          1936-1939

1          3          Banking Statements/checks/final estate banking          1945-1949

1          4          Banking Statements/checks/final estate banking          1940-1943, undated

1          5          Book Collecting, Book Buying          1936-1940

1          6          Clippings and other biographical material on McIntyre          Undated

1          7          Correspondence, bills, etc. about McIntyre's funeral          1951-1952

1          8          Dime Novel Club: correspondence to members, etc.          Undated

1          9          Dime novel collecting information, organizations          1951, undated

1          10          Directories and Address books          1940-1950, undated

1          11          Drovin, George Albert: "The Writeabout Club”         Undated

1          12          Estate Work: Settlement and correspondence (loans and gifts)          1951-1952

1          13          Finances: Bank deposit book          1915-1950

2          1          League of American Writers: Correspondence, receipts          1938-1940

2          2          Lists: Newspaper lists          Undated

2          3          Lists: Names and Addresses          Undated

2          4          Obituaries          1971

2          5          Pamphlets about Babe Ruth, the Union Library Association, etc.          Undated

2          6          Personal bills, receipts (medical, phone, etc.)          1932-1939

2          7          Photographs of McIntyre          Undated

2          8          Photographs of McIntyre          Undated

2          9          Photographs of McIntyre          Undated

2          10          Photographs of McIntyre          Undated

2          11          Photographs of McIntyre          Undated

2          12          Photographs of Dime Novel Collectors (Charles Bragin, George H. Doran)          Undated

2          13          Photographs of Illustrations used for dime novels          Undated

2          14          Photographs of Headers of Dime Novels and Boys' Magazines          Undated

2          15          Photographs of photographs of individuals (identified)          Undated

2          16          Publishing Records: Personal          1940-1951, undated

2          17          Publishing Records: Personal          Undated

2          18          Tax documents          1934-1941

2          19          Miscellaneous notes          Undated

2          20          Photocopies from Fall 2012 exhibit          Undated

2          21          City Paper article about McIntyre          March 16, 2006


Subseries 1.2: Writing Related Secondary Files, 1902-1950


3          1          Contracts and Negotiations with Publishers (Novels)          1909-1941

3          2          Contracts and Negotiations with Publishers (Plays)          1902-1919

3          3          Contracts and Negotiations with Publishers (Serials)          1908-1946

3          4          Contracts and Negotiations for the Dramatic Production of "Prince Ferdy" (by John T. McIntyre and Francis Hill) with George M. Cohan)          Undated

3          5          Copyright Documents and Assigns          1906-1950

3          6          Publishers' Royalty Statements          1936-1939

3          7          Publishers' Royalty Statements          1903-1941

3          8          Railway Express Agency Receipts          1941-1944

3          9          Railway Express Agency Receipts          1941-1946


Subseries 1.3: Published Reviews of McIntyre Writings, 1906-1937, undated



4          1          Ferment,  Reviewed by N.L. Rothman in The Saturday Review of Literature          July 17, 1937

4          2          Ferment, Reviewed in Time          Undated

4          3          "He Couldn't Forget Her." Reviewed by "g.m.m.” In: ?          Undated

4          4          Shot Towers, Reviewed by Charles Finger in The Deerborn Independent          May 21, 1927

4          5          Signing Off, Reviewed by N.L. Rothman in The Saturday Review of Literature          July 30, 1938

4          6          Signing Off, Reviewed by Alfred Kazin in The New York Times Book Review (2 copies)          July 17, 1938

4          7          Signing Off, Various reviews, in Time, etc.          Undated

4          8          With John Paul Jones, Fighting King George. Advertisement in Jordan Marsh Co. Book Catalogue          1906

4          9          Ledger of clippings          Undated

 

Subseries 1.4: Miscellaneous Research Notes, Notes Regarding Publishers and Newspapers, Collected Clippings, and Scrapbooks, 1908-1943, undated

 

5          1          Research material: boxing          1930-1931

5          2          Research material: boxing          1931

5          3          Research material: boxing          Undated

5          4          Miscellaneous material: "Buffalo Bill's Wild West”         Undated

5          5          Miscellaneous material: “One Hundred Proofs the World is not a Globe”         Undated

5          6          Miscellaneous material: “Westerns”         Undated

5          7          Science materials          1943, undated

5          8          Old Philadelphia          1908, undated

5          9          Miscellaneous notes          Undated

5          10          Miscellaneous notes          Undated

5          11          Miscellaneous notes          Undated

5          12          Miscellaneous notes          Undated

5          13          Miscellaneous notes          Undated

Series 2: Correspondence, 1941-1951, undated

 

Series 2 contains correspondence with fiction and dramatic publishers, producers, actors, dime novel collectors and booksellers, and others. Arranged by category.

Subseries 2.1: Relating to Prose Work, 1917-1950, undated



6          1          Adventure. Concerning publication of "American Revolution story," "Eagles of Empire." 2 letters.          April 1949
6          2          Agenzia Litteraria Internazionale. Concerning Italian translation, publication rights. Also in folder is correspondence with Pinker and Morrison, agents, dealing with Italian rights          1938-1947
6          3          Alfred A. Knopf (publisher)          January 13, 1948
6          4          Altshuler, Harry (agent). Concerning Fist Fighters," etc.          September 1947-January 1948

6          5          Ann Watkins Inc. (agent)          August 1945
6          6          Annie Laurie Williams, Inc.          January 1948
6          7          Arco Publishing Co. to William H. Kofoed. Concerning "Pooch.”         January 30, 1945

6          8          Argosy. Concerning various short stories.          January-June 1945
6          9          A.S. Barnes and Co, Publishers. Concerning "Fist Fighters." 2 letters.          March 1947
6          10          The Atlantic Monthly. Concerning "Front," "Some Days in the World.” 2 letters.          November 1939-March 1947

6          11          The Authors' League of America, The Authors Guild          September 1931-May 1940
6          12          Baer, Frank L. Ca. 50 letters          September 1942-June 1950
6          13          Blue Book Magazine. (McCall Corporation). Ca. 50 letters concerning short story publication.          March 1941-June 1950
6          14          The Bobbs-Merrill Company (publisher) Concerning "Ninth Floor-Middle City Tower.”         November 1940-December 1944
6          15          Boy's Life. Concerning "Motor Truck Boys.”         March 18, 1948
6          16          Madeleine Boyd (agent)          July 1949-October 1950
6          17          Brandt and Brandt (agent)          September 1939-May 1946
6          18          Bruce Publishing Co. Concerning: "St. Raphael, the Angel.”         August 14, 1946
6          19          Carrick and Evans (publisher). Concerning "Front.”         April 1940
6          20          Chambrun, Jacques (agent)          August 1939-June 1941
6          21          Chicago Tribune-New York News Syndicate. Concerning "At the Twenty Ninth Floor" and Appointment at Nine.”         April 1942
6          22          Collier's Weekly          October 1938-March 1950
6          23          Country Gentleman. Concerning "The Chandler Horses," etc.          May-June 1950
6          24          Coward McCann (publisher). Concerning "Ninth Floor: Middle City Tower.”         June 29, 1942
6          25          Creative Age Press          September 1945-March 1946
6          26          The Crime Club (publishers)          July 1942-August 1946
6          27          Curtis Brown Ltd. (publisher)          January 1934-December 1947
6          28          D. van Nostrand, Inc. (publisher). Concerning "Fist Fighters.”         March 23, 1948
6          29          Doubleday, Doran and Co.          June 1928-April 1950
6          30          Duell, Sloan and Pearce (publishers)          September 1941-December 1944
6          31          E.P. Dutton and Co., Publisher. Concerning" Jimmy Davis Returns." (Postcard).          November 1950
6          32          Exposition Press          February 1950

6          33          Farrar and Rinehart; Farrar, Straus and Co.; Rinehart (publishers)          March 1936-May 1949
6          34          Frederick A. Stokes Co. (publisher)          October 1940-October 1944
6          35          Gerard, Mary (agent). Concerning "Johnny Spargo and Company.”         August 2, 1949
6          36          Grosset and Dunlap (publisher)          July 1942-July 1948
6          37          Harcourt, Brace and Co. (publisher). Concerning "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution," "Jimmy Davis Returns.”         February-March 1949
6          38          Harper and Brothers (publisher)          June 1945-June 1949
6          39          Hearst's International (Cosmopolitan)          October 1936-December 1938
6          40          Hearthstone Publishing. Concerning publication of "Young Patriots.”         May-July 1948
6          41          Hillman Periodicals. Concerning "Death at Dakar.”         January-June 1945
6          42          Housing Publications. Concerning "Fermant.”         May-July 1937
6          43          Howell, Soskin and Co. (publishers). Concerning "The Aryan Comes Striding.”         February 1940
6          44          The John C. Winston Co.          March 1949-February 1951
6          45          Kearney, George F.          March 4, 1949
6          46          Kennicott, Donald. Concerning "Trouble at Beauchamp.”         May 1944
6          47          Kofoed, William H. (agent). Concerning "Pooch," "Blowing Weather," etc.          January 1945-May 1950
6          48          Ladies' Home Journal          February 1949-May 1950
6          49          Leslie Gordon Phillips (agent)          January 1944-May 1946
6          50          Liberty. Concerning "Fashionable Frocks," etc.          December 1938-November 1939
6          51          Liebling-Wood (agent)          May 1939-February 1947
6          52          J.B. Lippincott Co. (publishers)          June 1940-October 1952
6          53          Littauer and Wilkinson (agent). Concerning "That Chandler Girl," etc.          June 1950-April 1951
7          1          The MacMillan Co. (publisher)          March 1943-April 1950
7          2          Macrae Smith Co. (publisher). Concerning "Pooch," etc.          March-October 1948
7          3          Robert M. McBride (publisher). Concerning "The Aryan Comes Striding," etc.          November 1930-February 1940
7          4          Modern Age Books (publisher). Concerning "Slag," postcard.          March 1939
7          5          The New American Library (publisher). Concerning "Fist Fighters.”         January 1951
7          6          Pellegrini and Cudahy, Inc.          April 7, 1948
7          7          The Penn Publishing Company. Concerning "He Couldn't Forget Her.”         August 30, 1940
7          8          The Philadelphia Inquirer           November 1940-March 1942
7          9          Pictorial Review. Concerning "He Couldn't Forget Her.”         November 1936
7          10          Eric S. Pinker and Adrienne Morrison (agent)          November 1936-April 1937
7          11          Pocket Books, Inc.          October 1940-July 1947
7          12          Prentice-Hall (publisher). Concerning "O Land of Milk and Honey," "Fist Fighters.”         December 1946-July 1947
7          13          Random House, Inc.          August 1939-April 1951
7          14          Redbook Magazine (McCall Corporation)          July 1937-March 1948
7          15          The Register and Tribune Syndicate          September 1940-February 1951
7          16          Reynal and Hitchcock          May 1939-June 1945
7          17          Paul R. Reynolds and Son (agent). Concerning "Fist Fighters.          July 1947

7          18          The Saalfield Publishing Co. Concerning "Joe, Jack and Jim.”         February-March 1948
7          19          Sanders and Conroy (agent). Concerning "Mooney's in a Jam," etc.          February-November 1940
7          20          The Saturday Evening Post. Concerning: My Soul is Among Lions.”         June 1949
7          21          Charles Scribner's Sons          March 1939-June 1945
7          22          Seventeen. Concerning "Three Christmas Eves," "That Chandler Girl.”         March 1949
7          23          Sheridan House. Concerning "Who Killed that Man," "There Were Three in All.”         July 10, 1946
7          24          Short Stories          October 1937-August 1948
7          25          Sight Giver (Catholic Institute for the Blind). Concerning '… your lovely Christmas "Prayer"…'          October 1936-November 1937
7          26          Simon and Schuster. Concerning "Murder in "Ten-Two-Six.”         December 1947
7          27          Sport. Concerning "Fist Fighters.”         April 1946
7          28          St. Nicholas          May 1940
7          29          Standard Magazines          June 21, 1944
7          30          Street and Smith. Concerning "That Hour May Strike.”         May 1943
7          31          Thomas Y. Crowell Co. (publisher). Concerning "Front," etc.           July 1941-March 1949 
7          32          Tomorrow          January 1946
7          33          The Toronto Star Weekly. Concerning "Clouds over Alsek," etc.          December 1939
7          34          The Viking Press. Concerning "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution.”          February-April 1949
7          35          Watkins Syndicate          Undated
7          36          The Westminster Press. Concerning "Joe, Jack and Jim.”         March 1948
7          37          Whittlesey House. Concerning "Pooch," "Johnnie Spargo and Company," etc.           January 1944-June 1949
7          38          William Funk, Inc. (publisher). Concerning "The World Betrayed.”         October 1940
7          39          William Morrow and Co. (publisher). Concerning "That Chandler Girl.”          July-September 1950
7          40          William Sloane Associates (publisher). Concerning "O Land of Milk and Honey.”         June 1946
7          41          William H. Wise (publisher). Concerning "Death Came Swiftly.”          June-August 1945
7          42          The World Publishing Co. Concerning "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution.”          June 1948-February 1949
7          43          Roland Y… Concerning "Front.”         July 1936
7          44          Ziff-Davis Publishing Co.           March 1943
7          45          Unidentified and partial letters (4). One is signed Isabella Taylor, one "Larry”         Undated
7          46          Correspondence concerning Ashton-Kirk serialization in various newspapers nationally. About 50 letters.          1917-1919



Subseries 2.2: Relating to Drama/Plays, 1924-1950, undated

8          1          Abbey Theatre, Dublin. Concerning "That Night at Dolan's.”         Undated
8          2          A C A. Concerning "Front.”         July 19, 1944
8          3          Alvin Theatre. Concerning "St. Raphael, the Angel," etc.          May 1940-October 1945
8          4          Armitage, Buford          August 1936-October 1945
8          5          Barry, William Giffard. Concerning "A Young Man's Fancy.”         January 31, 1936
8          6          Bucks County Playhouse. Concerning "6 Pentagon Terrace.”         January 20, 1947
8          7          Catholic University Theatre. Concerning "St. Raphael, the Angel.”         March 25, 1946
8          8          Claire Leonard and Carl Cowl (agent). Concerning "St. Raphael, the Angel.”         November 10, 1947
8          9          Clurman, Harold. Concerning "She Told the World," etc.          April-May 1946
8          10          Dallas Theatre Inc. Concerning "Slag," etc.          January-March 1948
8          11          The Dramatist's Guild, The Dramatist's Play Service          April 1937-May 1940
8          12          Dublin Gate Theatre. Concerning "That Night at Dolan's.”         February 9, 1945
8          13          Elliot. John T. Concerning "Front.”         March 15, 1948
8          14          Eric S. Pinker and Adrienne Morrison (agents)          May 1936-April 1937
8          15          Federal Theatre Project (Works Progress Administration)          March-November 1937
8          16          Fontanne, Lynn          March 1937-June 1946
8          17          French, Samuel (agent). Concerning "Stork over Gramercy.”         January-August 1943
8          18          Fuller, Edmund. Concerning "Satyr.”         October-December 1935
8          19          Le Gallienne, Eva. Letter of May 15, 1943 typed, signed by Madeleine L'Engle.          October 1942-January 1946
8          20          Garfield, John. Concerning "They Were Going Away.”         April-May 1940
8          21          Gielgud, John          June 23, 1939
8          22          Haines, Robert T.          December 5, 1937
8          23          Hardwicke, Sir Cedric. Concerning "Sub-Selves.”         September 15, 1938
8          24          Hayward, Leland (agent)          July 26, 1945
8          25          Higgins, Joy M. Concerning "Slag," "Front," "That Night at Dolan's.”         November 5, 1933
8          26          The Johns Hopkins Playshop          March 1945-October 1949
8          27          Kaufman, George S.          June 17, 1943
8          28          The Lambs. Concerning "Front.”         June 6, 1939
8          29          Lee, Canada. Concerning "Slag.”         September 5, 1942
8          30          Lindsay, Howard          January 1943-September 1950
8          31          McClintic, Guthrie          April 1943-November 1945
8          32          The Mercury Theatre. Concerning "Big Fallah.”         September-December 1937
8          33          The New York Times          September 6, 1949
8          34          Norman Bel Geddes and Co.          December 11, 1939
8          35          Pasadena Playhouse          November 1946-December 1947
8          36          The Play House. Concerning "She Told the World.”         December 1947-March 1948
8          37          Plymouth Theatre          February-March 1946
8          38          Pritchett, Mary Leonard (agent). Concerning "Signing Off.”         July 6, 1938
8          39          Ponder, G.H. (Vagabond Players). Concerning "They Were Going Away.”         December 20, 1944
8          40          Richard J. Madden Play Co.          September 1937-November 1947
8          41          Rollitts, Sarah (The Salkow Agency)          January 27, 1947
8          42          The Sandpiper          July 6, 1936
8          43          Sam Jaffe Agency          January-April 1945
8          44          Shumlin, Herman. Concerning "Stork over Gramercy.”         October-November 1944
8          45          Susman, Bernard. Concerning "Sub-Selves.”         June-July 1937
8          46          Tamarack Enterprises, Inc. (Playhouse)           June 1939
8          47          Theatre Inc. Concerning "St. Raphael, the Angel.”         July-September 1946
8          48          Tyler, George C. Concerning "A Young Man's Fancy.”         January-July 1937
8          49          United Plays. Concerning McIntyre's legal rights to "The Thief in the House," his adaptation of the Hungarian play "Der Oberst.”         March 1924
8          50          Wilson, John C. Concerning "St. Raphael, the Angel.”         June 1946

Subseries 2.3: Relating to Film, TV, Radio, 1936-1949



8          51          Alice Kauser and R.L. Griffin (agency). Concerning film contracts          June 1941-June 1944
8          52          American Broadcasting Company (to J.E. Molly). Concerning "Christmas Story.”          February 8, 1950
8          53          A. and S. Lyons (agency)          November-December 1946
8          54          Columbia Pictures. Concerning "St. Raphael, the Angel," etc.          December 1946-April 1947
8          55          Eric S. Pinker and Adrienne Morrison (agency)          September 1936-May 1938
8          56          Leland Hayward-John McCormick (agency)          June 1938-July 1939
8          57          Lichtig and Englander          April 1940
8          58          Lindsay, Howard. Concerning "That Night at Dolan's," etc.          Undated
8          59          Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer          February 1941-December 1946
8          60          Muni, Paul          June 15, 1939
8          61          Paul Kohner, Inc. (agent)          May 1940
8          62          RKO Radio Pictures. Concerning "That Chandler Girl," etc.          June 1947-September 1950
8          63          Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corp. Concerning "A Young Man's Fancy," "The Man Who Forgot Three Years.”         April 15, 1942
8          64          Universal Pictures Co. Concerning legal rights to "A Young Man's Fancy.”         May 1937
8          65          Warner Bros. Pictures. Concerning "Hauling West,” "6 Pentagon Terrace.”         August 1942-April 1947
8          66          Wilck, Laura D.          August 1937-October 1949
8          67          William Morris Agency. Concerning "Steps Going Down," etc.          July 1936-November 1946
8          68          A. H. Woods          December 1939

 

Subseries 2.4: Relating to Dime Novel Collecting, 1914-1951

 

9          1          Adimari, Ralph          November 5, 1934

9          2          Austin, Charles H.          December 6, 1939

9          3          Baer, Frank L.          September 1942

9          4          Barton, George S. Ca. 20 letters          1937-1942

9          5          Beck, George Norman          1939-1941

9          6          Bert, Frisco          July 1937-August 1946

9          7          Bragin, Charles. Ca. 150 letters          October 1931-March 1944

9          8          Burns, W.M.          February 5, 1936

9          9          Caldwell, Raymond          January 1931-June 1950

9          10          Craufurd, Ross. Ca. 25 letters          July 1932-November 1946

9          11          Cummings, Ralph F. Ca. 100 letters          January 1936-May 1950

9          12          Dahlstedt, Arvid          January 1938

9          13          Daniel, C.W.          June 16, 1942

9          14          Douglas, C.E.          August-September 1946

9          15          Erbe, Wm.          January-February 1938

9          16          Flaum, George T.          November 1946-July 1947

9          17          Frank (from John T. McIntyre). Tuesday. Concerning books.          Undated

9          18          French, George. Ca. 25 letters          February 1933-March 1944

9          19          Fries, Frank T          July 30, 1934

9          20          Frye, Bob          January-February 1940

9          21          Gander, Wm. H.          December 13, 1941

9          22          Gibson, Walter B.          November 1939-June 1945

9          23          Gerard, Frank to Fred          Undated

9          24          Grantham, Joe           January-March 1941

9          25          Harris, Frank M.          June 14, 1938

9          26          Horsey, Alfred          June 14, 1945

9          27          Irwin, Lacey D.          February 2, 1936

9          28          Johannsen, Albert. Ca. 100 letters. Included is photograph of correspondent          May 1934-August 1950

9          29          Jonas, Charles. Ca. 25 letters          January 1931-October 1943

9          30          Kreling, Wm. M.          January 1932

9          31          Krumbein, W.C.          July 31, 1934

9          32          Lee, Fred          June-July 1937

10          1          Madison, James. Ca. 50 letters          January 1932-December 1942

10          2          Maroske, Paul C. Ca. 20 letters          February 1932-October 1938

10          3          Martin, James Wm.          November 17, 1951

10          4          Medcraft, J.          October 1938-May 1942

10          5          Meredith, G. Ca. 20 letters          January 1931-January 1933

10          6          Miller, WC.          February 1936

10          7          Moran, P.J. Ca. 20 letters          July 1936-June 1942

10          8          Morris, Roy E.          July 1944-May 1951

10          9          Nathan, S.          January 28, 1914-January 1933

10          10          Old Authors Farm (bookseller)          1945

10          11          Ono, Barry. Ca. 50 letters          December 1933-June 1940

10          12          Pitzer, F.P.          August 14, 1941

10          13          Roberts, Lester          July 27, 1945

10          14          Saln, George          January-February 1937

10          15          Schlicter, H. Walter          August 2, 1941

10          16          Singleton, Fred T.          August 1935-November 1946

10          17          Smeltzer, Robert H.          July 7, 1937

10          18          Smith, Ralph P.          May 18, 1937

10          19          Spraker, F.W. Ca. 20 letters          February-September 1941

10          20          Taylor, Charles M.          November 1939-May 1941

10          21          Urban, Al Jr.          December 1944-March 1945

10          22          Van D…, Harry          May 18, 1938

10          23          Wearing, F.N.          November-December 1938

10          24          Yust, Walter          January 1943-June 1950

10          25          Miscellaneous (Listings of dime novels, unidentified correspondence (1 note, 1 postcard)          Undated

 

Subseries 2.5: Miscellaneous Correspondence, 1934-1949

 

10          26          Correspondence about book typing, copyright, printing          1937-1946

10          27          Correspondence with literary associations (The Writeabout Club, Philadelphia Art Alliance, The Christophers, The Olga Shepiro Award)          1939-1949

10          28          Correspondence about miscellaneous business (shoe dealer, doctor, etc.)          1936-1942

10          29          On “Hitler”, between T. von Ziekursen and Princess Catherine Radziwill          1934

 

Subseries 2.6: Personal Correspondence, 1935-1951, undated

 

11          1          A.C. (Afflerbach?)          June 1944

11          2          Anderson, Peggy and William          October 1949

11          3          Aronson, Jules E.          Undated

11          4          Astley, Edna L.          Undated

11          5          Beamish, R.J. (Mrs.)          Undated

11          6          Benefield, Barry          June-August 1939 

11          7          Brandt, William E.          April 1945-May 1950

11          8          Brown, Walter C.          September 1941-May 1944

11          9          Burgum, Edwin G.          April 1, 1939

11          10          Buri, Heran Eric          March 1940

11          11          Burke, Eddie          Undated

11          12          Caldwell, Raymond L.          March-August 1947

11          13          Carter, Bertha S.          December 23, 1948

11          14          Cowen, Jack P.          February 21, 1936

11          15          Craufurd, Ross          January 17, 1945

11          16          Cunningham, Joe          January 1937-May 1942

11          17          Doris (Holograph)          Undated

11          18          Drovin, George Albert          April 3, 1944

11          19          Dudley, E. Laurence          July 1944-April 1946

11          20          Dunn, Clara          April 1951

11          21          Emerick, Robert H.          March 15, 1947

11          22          Fontanne, Lynn          February 20, 1937

11          23          Giffen, R.L. (Larry)          August 1943-June 1945

11          24          Grosset, Nell          March 22, 1938

11          25          Halliday, Brett          Undated

11          26          Hast, Henry (or Hart?)          February 1946

11          27          Hazel Mae          Undated

11          28          Helton, Virginia          January 1951

11          29          Hilder, Wendy          August 22, 1972

11          30          Hughes, Eric M.          January 1944 

11          31          Ing, Diana          Undated

11          32          Jones, J.M. A fan of "A Young Man's Fancy.”         April 10, 1942

11          33          Kearney, George F.          1946-1950

11          34          Keen, Myra and Jeff          December 1950

11          35          Kemp, H.S.M.          January 1938

11          36          Kerrigan, Jim          Undated

11          37          Lunt, Alfred          January 16, 1937

11          38          MacIver, Don          February 1950

11          39          Massachusetts Historical Society          January 31, 1938

11          40          McDevitt, Harry S.          July 1937

11          41          McGirr, Newman F.          September 1937-June 1939

11          42          Mearns, Hughes (Bill)          December 1948

11          43          Molloy, Brenda          July 1950

11          44          Moriyama, R.P.          January-May 1951

11          45          Mueller, Joseph C.          June 18, 1936

11          46          Noel, Mary          June 7, 1949

11          47          O'Brien, C.J.          May 18, 1935 

11          48          Ono, Barry          May 1936-September 1937

11          49          Price, Phil          November 30, 1936

11          50          Ralph           November 1943-May 1950

11          51          Rambean, L.D.          March 1947

11          52          Ray, Betsy          June 1937-May 1951

11          53          Ray, Helen          January 1947-May 1951

11          54          Rehe          March 1950

11          55          Roesgen, Jack H          February-July 1937

11          56          Scott, Robert Wilson          January 1950-March 1951

11          57          Shapiro, Frederic E.          September 1936

11          58          Skinner, Marion E.          Undated

11          59          Smith, Chas. B.          September 1936-April 1939

11          60          Smith, Edgar W.          May 1940

11          61          Streeper, Wells, T.          April 3, 1944

11          62          Sugrne, Thomas          March 1950-April 1951

11          63          Tewson, W. Orton          October 20, 1936

11          64          Yust, Walter          July 1936-May 1940

11          65          Greeting cards from various people          Undated

11          66          Unidentified (from McIntyre). Regards publishing the work of T. von Ziekursch posthumously          February 21, 1936

11          67          Brilioth, Börje. To: Von (Ziekirsch, Ziekursch, or Steinach). Letter found with receipt from furniture store, (also in envelope)          Undated

Series 3: Published Pulp Appearances of Short and Long Fiction, 1897-1948, undated

Series 3 contains published stories: Pulp Periodical Issues and Tear Sheets of McIntyre fiction arranged by title; and two Bound volumes of stories including, both sections including pseudonymous authorship.

 

12          1          “A One-Two for Nate.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by F.S.Humiston.] In: Short Stories. pp. 40-49. First line: Dan Brophy came down to the camp one day while I was training . . .”          Undated

12          2          “A Short Shot at Purdy.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Chas Wood.] In: Short Stories. pp. 28-39. First line: “The contract had read that there was to be a thousand dollars for the winner . . .”          October 10, 1948

12          3          “Afar from Elsinore.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Hanson Booth.] In: ?? pp. 431-444. First line: “A subdued chant arose in the Fourth.” (4 copies)          Undated

12          4          “Ahead of the Drums.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by W. Glackens.] In Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly. pp. 422-427. First line: “A door directly across the way flew open . . .” (2 copies, 1 in ‘Bindings of Multiple Stories, Vol. 2’)          Undated

12          5          “At Ten Forty-Six.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 83, no. 6. Pp.76-77. First line: “Spencer had looked at the clock in his office shortly before this . . .”          October 1946

12          6          “At the Twenty-Ninth Floor.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustration by F.S. Humiston Jr.] In: Short Stories. Pp. 144-153. First line: “The big steel job, rearing like magic on the east side of the river . . .”           Undated

12          7          “At Two Eight.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by John Fulton.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 82, no. 4. pp. 2-5. First line: “Amos Smite sat on the edge of his bed.”          February 1946

12          8          “Beaumarchais: Friend of America.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Popular Biography. Vol. 1, no. 2. pp. 31-45. First line: “It has repeatedly been said that republics are ungrateful . . .”          December 1929

12          9          “Blackmail.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Manning de V. Lee.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 79, no. 2. pp. 51-57. First line: “The telephone buzzed and Jerry Mooney took it up.”          June 1944

12          10          “Blindfolded.” By Kerry O’Neil. Pages cut from 2 copies of “Blows in the Dark” (see below) and pasted into new binding under this new title and author. First line: “Midday fell upon the sun-bleached mountains that ridge Southern California . . .”          Undated

12          11          “Blowing Weather.” (Illustration “removed 990920 from ‘The Vance’ copy of Blowing Weather). Caption: “‘The man’s mad!’ Anthony told himself. ‘I was a fool to give heed to him in the first place.’”          1923

12          12          “Blows in the Dark.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustration by Leo Morey.] In:

Complete Detective Novel Magazine. No. 41. pp. 8-84. First line: “Midday fell upon the sunbleached mountains that ridge Southern California . . .”          November 1931

12          13          “The Cartridge Kid.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 135-171. First line: “Desert Rim stood on the spot where the sands touched the foot of the Solomon range . . .”          Undated

12          14          “For the Glory of Monsignor.” [A Riley and Hopkins Story.] [Illustrated by E.N.C.] By John T. McIntyre. In: ?? pp. 247-259. First line: “A barb of sunlight entered at a tall, stained-glass window . . .”          Undated

12          15          “Girard: Merchant and Mariner.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Popular Biography. Vol. 1, no. 1. pp. 4-17. First line: “When stout and good-natured Jean Couteau walked to and fro on the deck of his ship . . .” (Biography of Stephen Girard)          November 1929

12          16          “Goose McGonnagle’s Diplomacy.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Otto Lang.] In: Iroquois: A Modern Magazine. pp. 17-23. First line: “It was early one Sunday morning, and McGarrigal’s Alley was quiet and still . . .”          October 3, 1897

12          17          “Green Ice.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Gustavson.] In: ?? pp. 117-144. First line: “Jerry Mooney shot upward in one of the high-speed elevators of the Etruria Tower.” (A loose sheet in the same folder bears the title, “Trouble Walks in on Mooney,” also “by Kerry O’Neil”)          Undated

12          18          “The Hand of Glory.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Sidney Riesenberg. In: The Philadelphia Record Sunday Magazine. pp. 3-4, 18-19. First line: “The clerks and patrons had already gone . . .”          May 9, 1915

13          1          “Hauling West.” [Part 1 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 75, no. 6. pp. 2-21. First line: “A tall, bronzed young man on an old roan horse rode up the dusty turnpike . . .”          October 1942

13          2          “Hauling West.” [Part 1 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 75, no. 6. pp. 2-21. First line: “A tall, bronzed young man on an old roan horse rode up the dusty turnpike . . .”          October 1942

13          3          “Hauling West.” [Part 1 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 75, no. 6. pp. 2-21. First line: “A tall, bronzed young man on an old roan horse rode up the dusty turnpike . . .”          October 1942

13          4          “Hauling West.” [Part 2 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 1. pp. 86-106. First line: “‘You are a stranger here, I think,’ said the landlord.”          November 1942

13          5          “Hauling West.” [Part 2 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 1. pp. 86-106. First line: “‘You are a stranger here, I think,’ said the landlord.”          November 1942

13          6          “Hauling West.” [Part 2 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 1. pp. 86-106. First line: “‘You are a stranger here, I think,’ said the landlord.”          November 1942

13          7          “Hauling West.” [Part 3 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 2. pp. 54-74. First line: “From back in Pennsylvania.”          December 1942

13          8          “Hauling West.” [Part 4, conclusion.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 3. pp. 95-109. First line: “Young Denis Abernathy had come out of the West . . .”          January 1943

13          9          “Hauling West.” [Part 4, conclusion.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 3. pp. 95-109. First line: “Young Denis Abernathy had come out of the West . . .”          January 1943

13          10          “Hauling West.” [Part 4, conclusion.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Maurice Bower.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 76, no. 3. pp. 95-109. First line: “Young Denis Abernathy had come out of the West . . .”          January 1943

13          11          “Heralds of Conquest.” “A Story in Four Parts.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. First line: “The United States flag flew over the Army and Navy building . . .”          Undated

13          12           “Hipplewait Breaks His Bat.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 46-54. First line: “‘I think we got a chance for the flag,’ said Cuddy to me.”          Undated 

13          13          “Hired at San Pedro.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 58-67. First line: “How often,” said Talk Tanner, “Have I told you to keep away from cards?”          Undated 

13          14          “His Back to the Sea.” [Part 4 of 4.] By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by John Fulton.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 79, no. 1. pp. 61-81. First line: “The peddler Tavish Abernathy and his fifteen-year-old son Simon were driven by a storm to shelter.” (See “O Land of Milk and Honey” for the other 3 parts, as well as another copy of this entry)          May 1944

13          15          “How Tommy Landed the Goods.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: ?? pp. 522-527. First line: “A good looking, well-built young man attired in the newest cut of clothes . . .” (4 copies)          Undated

13          16          “Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.] In: Everybody’s. First line: “Of two pictures, here is the first . . .”          October 1923-January 1924

14          1          “The Lottery Ticket.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Walter de Maris.] In: ?? pp. 90-96. First line: “It was cool and pleasant under Clancy’s awning . . .” (4 copies)          Undated

14          2          “The Man Who Forgot Three Years.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Blue Book Magazine. pp. 2-19, 84-119. First line: “As Jimmy Smith stepped along the street . . .”          Undated

14          3          “The Man Who Forgot Three Years.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Blue Book Magazine. pp. 2-19, 84-119. First line: “As Jimmy Smith stepped along the street . . .”          Undated

14          4          “The Man Who Forgot Three Years.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Blue Book Magazine. pp. 2-19, 84-119. First line: “As Jimmy Smith stepped along the street . . .”          Undated

14          5          “Mooney in a Bad Corner.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Charles Chickering.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 80, no. 5. pp. 98-105. First line: “Jerry Mooney had been working on the tag end of a forgery case . . .”          March 1945

14          6          “Mooney Makes with Murder.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by John Fulton.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 77, no. 5. pp. 108-144. First line: “Jerry Mooney sat in his inner office in the Etruria Tower . . .”          September 1943

14          7          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Robert W. Crowther.] In: The Philadelphia Inquirer, Gold Seal Novel Section. First line: “Mickey always said the music at Philadelphia’s The Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          October 15, 1944

14          8          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Robert W. Crowther.] In: The Philadelphia Inquirer, Gold Seal Novel Section. First line: “Mickey always said the music at Philadelphia’s The Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          October 15, 1944

14          9          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Ladson.] In: ?? pp. 121-180. First line: “Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          Undated

14          10          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Ladson.] In: ?? pp. 121-180. First line: “Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          Undated

14          11          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Ladson.] In: ?? pp. 121-180. First line: “Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          Undated

14          12          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Ladson.] In: ?? pp. 121-180. First line: “Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          Undated

14          13          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Ladson.] In: ?? pp. 121-180. First line: “Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          Undated

14          14          “Murder is Stupid.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Gustavson.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 80, no. 2. pp. 110-119. First line: “The thousand eyes of the Etruria Tower were, one by one, winking out that evening...”          December 1944

14          15          “Night Fares.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by F.S. Humiston Jr.] In: Short Stories. pp. 139-147. First line: “I’m sitting in the breakfast nook taking my coffee, and the wife is talking.” (2 copies)          Undated

14          16          “No. 6 Pentagon Terrace.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by L.R.Gustavson.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 80, no. 4. pp. 128-144. First line: “The cab sloshed through the water and up to the curb, and stopped.”          February 1945

15          1          “O Land of Milk and Honey: A Romance Dealing with Early American Transportation.” By John T. McIntyre. 8 parts, of which 4 are published as “His Back to the Sea” and 4 as “Hauling West.” All 8 removed from their original magazines (i.e. Blue Book Magazines) and bound together. On the first page of the first installment of “His Back . . .” and “Hauling West,” there is a typed label, pasted in, reading, “This is Part [1 or 2] of “O land of Milk and Honey.”          October 1942-May 1944

15          2          “Pickering’s Wax Lady.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. pp. 1292-1295. First line: “Pickering was on his was to lunch . . .”          April 1909

15          3          “Please the Customers.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 86-129. First line: “Bill Riggs liked the excitement manifested throughout the Waltz-Dream arena . . .”          October 10, 1943

15          4          “Pooch (and Sundry Other People).” Part 1 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Charles Chickering.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 77, no. 3. pp. 14-28. First line: “The dog-shop was on Main Street . . .”          July 1943

15          5          “Pooch (and Sundry Other People).” Part 2 of 3. Same. Vol. 77, no. 4. pp. 110-122. First line: “When Michael reached the dog shop after the recovery of Honey . . .”          August 1943

15          6          “Pooch (and Sundry Other People).” Part 3 of 3. Same. Vol. 77, no. 5. pp. 62-74. First line: “ October passed with flurries of wind and dried leaves.”          September 1943

15          7          “The Romeo and Juliet of McGarrigal Alley.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Chap-Book.Vol. IX, no. 1. pp. 22-26. First line: “Oh we’re frinds to our frinds, an’ we’re foes to our foes.”          May 15, 1898

15          8          “The Romeo and Juliet of McGarrigal Alley.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Chap-Book.Vol. IX, no. 1. pp. 22-26. First line: “Oh we’re frinds to our frinds, an’ we’re foes to our foes.”          May 15, 1898

15          9          “Saddle Bums.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 112-131. First line: “There was a sharp, shocking sound, followed by a long whine.” (2 copies)          Undated

15          10          “The Scarzi Murder.” By R.G. Dixon. In: Complete Detective Novel Magazine. pp. 8-87. First line: “When I went into the little room…”          February 1932

15          11          “Six-Guns on Spyglass.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 68-100. First line: As the big Gregory truck . . .” (2 copies)          Undated

15          12          “Skibby Signs Two.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 52-59. First line: “It’s on March 8th and I get a wire from Danburg.”          Undated

15          13          “Snapping Them Down.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 95-100. First line: “Skibby’s piecing out the end of the season managing the Striped Sox . . .”          Undated 

15          14          “Stepping Ahead of Eddie.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Raymond Sisley.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 80, no. 6. pp. 114-119. First line: When Jerry Mooney let himself into his office in the Etruria Tower . . .”          April 1945 

15          15          “The Story of Stephen Collins Foster.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Popular Biography. Vol. 1, no. 5. pp. 19-32. First line: “Some half dozen years ago, a famous ‘Tin Pan Alley’ song smith . . .”          March 1930

15          16          “The Talking Horse.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: ?? pp. 48-53. First line: “Upon a fence across the way was posted . . .” (3 copies)          Undated 

16          1          “The Three Wise Men.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The American Short Story. pp. 41-53. Vol. 1, no. 5. First line: “Riley and Hopkins sat in a niche in the back wall of the church . . .” (2 copies)          March 1930

16          2          “The Three Wise Men.” By John T. McIntyre. [Publication not identified.] pp. 551-560          Undated

16          3          “The Tramp’s Pug Passenger.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 74, no. 2. pp. 53-59. First line: “Captain Earnest Potwa, of the New Orleans steam ‘bum’ Meteor, . . .”          December 1941

16          4          “A Turn Over for Tony.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Chas Wood.] In: Short Stories. pp. 90-115. First line: “Shorty Kane was standing at the door . . .” (3 copies)          March 25, 1948

16          5          “Twice Dead.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by John Fulton.] In: Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 79, no. 6. pp. 105-125. First line: “The gray morning dripped its moisture into the streets.”          October 1944

16          6          “The Vanished Chauffer.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 7, no. 6. pp. 1153-1198. First line: “The big white motor-car slid up to the front of the ‘Ladle and Lamp’ just as the November night was falling.”          October 1948

16          7          “The Yellow Violin.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Arthur [Z.? M.? Y.?] Dove.] In: ?? pp. 249-254. First line: “‘I wonder,’ said Bat Scanlon, ‘if this fellow Ysaye . . .’” (2 copies)          Undated


16                    Vol. 1: “Sharp Work.” By MacBurney Gates. (“Complete Book-Length Novel.”) In: Brief Stories Magazine. pp. 3-90. First line: “Kenyon ate the good little dinner . . .”; “Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.] In: Everybody’s. Vol. 49, no. 4. pp. 2-20. First line: “Of two pictures, here is the first . . .”; “Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.] In: Everybody’s. Vol. 49, no. 5. pp. 31-48. First line: “Toward Espirito Santo, outpost on the border . . .”; “Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.] In: Everybody’s. Vol. 49, no. 6. pp. 101-115. First line: “In the Hotel Europe in the City of Mexico . . .”; “Kildare of the Border.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by Charles Hargens.] In: Everybody’s. Vol. 50, no. 1. pp. 133-162. First line: “Romance in the old Mexico City of the late sixties!”; “Doubles and Quits.” (“Complete Novel”) by MacBurney Gates. In: Brief stories Magazine. pp. 3-39. First line: “It was in the lobby of the Great Southern Hotel, New Orleans.”; “Heralds of Conquest.” “A Story in Four Parts.” Part I. By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. pp. 100-127. First line: “The United States flag flew over the Army and Navy building . . .”; “Heralds of Conquest.” Part II. By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. pp. 64-88. First line: “The Russian’s Chips were counted, and a note made of the amount . . .”; “Heralds of Conquest.” Part III. By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. pp. 106-134. First line: “Dick Shannon, with the words of President Peixoto well in mind . . .”; “Heralds of Conquest.” Part IV. By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. pp. 58-87. First line: “As Shannon watched, he saw the girl lift a hand and point at the man inside the window.”          October 1923-September 1924, undated

16                    Vol. 2: “Kelly and the Strange God.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Brief Stories. pp. 67-76. First line: “Kelly was passing the church.”; “The Five Mile Stretch.” [An Ashton-Kirk Story.] By John T. McIntyre. In: McBride’s Magazine. pp. 100-110. First line: “It is possible that I’d never have become acquainted with Ashton-Kirk . . .”; “The Three Wise Men.” By John T. McIntyre. [Publication not identified.]  pp. 551-560; “Ahead of the Drums.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated by W. Glackens.] In Frank Leslie’s Popular Monthly.  pp. 422-427. First line: “A door directly across the way flew open . . .”; “Eyes of Darkness.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Brief Stories. pp. 3-11. First line: “Wu Ming crossed the room with hushed tread . . .”; “Greenbaum’s Kelly.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Brief Stories. pp. 9-14. First line: “Greenbaum carried on an antique business in a good street.”; “The Vanished Forty-Two.” “An Ashton-Kirk Story.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Brief Stories. pp. 435-444. First line: “That February night was the bitterest in my experience.”; “Hack Coogan Buys a Gun.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 95-99. First line: “Hack Coogan had spotted the place about two days before.”; “Duddington Delivers the Tangerines.” By John T. McIntyre. [Periodical not identified.] pp. 80-93. First line: “While Duddington Pell Chambers dressed that morning . . .”; “One Dozen: Soft: Size Eighteen.” By John T. McIntyre. [Periodical not identified.] pp. 80-93. First line: “While Duddington Pell Chambers dressed that morning . . .”; “What Passed in the Mist.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: The Popular Magazine. pp. 84-88. First line: “There was a steady, drizzling rain and the fire escape was slippery . . .”; “The Fence Breaker.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. pp. 67-81. First line: “There was a short right-field fence at our ballpark . . .”; “Dorgan Comes Back.” By John T. McIntyre. [Illustrated.] In: Short Stories. First line: “There was one long, lifting roar . . .”; “The Bronze Badge.” I. “The Adventure of the Pelican Club.” By MacBurney Gates. (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories.  pp. 59-64. First line: “The first time I ever saw Cravath was at Bernard’s . . .” ; “The Bronze Badge.” II. The Adventure of the Double Cross.” By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories.  pp. 98-102. First line: “Cravath lived in a pretty suburban place . . .” ; “The Bronze Badge.” III. “The Adventure of Crosby’s June.” By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 92-98. First line: “I had not yet arisen when Charlie Paterson came in.”; “The Bronze Badge.” IV. “The Adventure of The Beautiful Lady.” By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories.  pp. 110-116. First line: “When we left the cab stable . . .”; “The Bronze Badge.” V. “The Adventure of the Hindoo Butler.” By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 107-112. First line: “I called at Cravath’s a few nights later . . .”; “The Bronze Badge.” VI. “The Adventure of the Swiss Professor.” By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 101-106. First line: “One day about four in the afternoon . . .”; “The Bronze Badge.” VII. “The Adventure of the Lonely House.” By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 100-106. First line: “One evening not long after the affair of the Swiss professor . . .”; “The Bronze Badge.” VIII. “The Adventure of the Merchant’s Trust.” [Illustrated.] By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 78-84. First line: “Cravath Stopped at my hotel about noon one day . . .”; “The Bronze Badge.” IX. “The Adventure of La Sultana.” [Illustrated.] By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 102-108. First line: “It was by the merest chance that I saw Cravath that morning.”; “The Bronze Badge.” X. (Conclusion.)  “The Adventure of the French Restaurant.” [Illustrated.] By MacBurney Gates. In: Brief Stories. pp. 99-106. First line: “Of course I was not to win a lady fair . . .”; “Pickering’s Wax Lady.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. pp. 1292-1295. First line: “Pickering was on his was to lunch . . .”; “When Moscowitz Lost His Hop.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. pp. 89-94. First line: “During the sixth inning I was up in the grandstand . . .”; “Corrigan’s Floating Rib.” By John T. McIntyre. In: Short Stories. pp. 86-91. First line: “‘Stenzler,’ says Cuddy, to me . . .”; “Bound to Get Home.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. pp. 646-650. First line: “I had a letter from Smiler Conroy the other day . . .”; “At Hasting’s Junction.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. pp. 1071-1078. First line: “The train was one of those great glaring affairs that come out of the West . . .”; “The Vanished Chauffer.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Blue Book Magazine. Vol. 7, no. 6. pp. 1153-1198. First line: “The big white motor-car slid up to the front of the ‘Ladle and Lamp’ just as the November night was falling.”          April 1909-October 1948, undated

17          1          American Short Story, The. A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction. Vol.1, no. 1          November 1929

17          2          American Short Story, The. A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction. Vol.1, no. 2          December 1929

17          3          American Short Story, The. A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction. Vol.1, no. 3          January 1930

17          4          American Short Story, The. A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction. Vol.1, no. 4          February 1930

17          5          American Short Story, The. A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction. Vol.1, no. 6          April 1930

17          6          American Short Story, The. A Monthly Magazine of Contemporary Fiction. Vol.1, no. 6          April 1930

Series 4: Manuscripts, 1923-1932, undated

 

Series 4 contains holograph manuscripts and typescripts of creative works. Arranged by category and title.

Subseries 4.1: McIntyre (and Kerry O’Neil, pseudonym) Fiction, 1923, undated

 

18          1          "A Gambler Marshall: (Ben Thompson).” By Kerry O'Neil. 16 pages.
First line: "In his younger days Ben Thompson was a drifting printer…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          2          "A Gambler Marshall: (Ben Thompson).” By Kerry O'Neil. 16 pages.
First line: "In his younger days Ben Thompson was a drifting printer…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          3          "A Gambler Marshall: (Ben Thompson).” By Kerry O'Neil. 16 pages.
First line: "In his younger days Ben Thompson was a drifting printer…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          4          "A Lot of People." By John T. McIntyre. 186 pages, chapters I-XX. Manuscript of "Steps Going Down." First line: "Mrs. Salz was dusting the sitting room…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          5          "A Lot of People." Pages 187-366, chapters XXI-XXXVII. Manuscript of "Steps Going Down.” First line: "Pete sat at the window of his room and thought about Slavin.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          6          "A Lot of People." Pages 367-468, chapters XXXVIII-XLV. Manuscript of "Steps Going Down.” First line: "As Pete went down the stairs he saw the bulky form of the short nosed young man in the lower hall.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          7          "A Lot of People." Pages 469-569, chapters XLVI-LV. Manuscript of "Steps Going Down.” First line: "Shandy's press was in a small street at the top of a building with a pitched roof, and small, dim-looking widows.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          8          "A One-Two for Nate.” By Kerry O'Neil. 29 pages. First line: "Dan Brophy came down to the camp one day while I was training Dixie Moran…” (Typescript). (2 copies)          Undated

18          9          "A Shanty for Bulger.": By John T. McIntyre. 21 pages. First line: "Steve Mace carried the bucket and towels and other things up the aisle at the Waltz-Dream Arena…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          10          "A Shanty for Bulger.": By John T. McIntyre. 21 pages. First line: "Steve Mace carried the bucket and towels and other things up the aisle at the Waltz-Dream Arena…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          11          "A Short Shot at Purdy.” By Kerry O'Neil. 31 pages. First line: "The contract had read that there was to be a thousand dollars for the winner…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

18          12          "A Turn Over for Tony.” By Kerry O'Neil. 72 pages. First line: "Shorty Kane was standing at the door of the "Boxing Booth" with the proprietor, Al Plum.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          13          "A Turn Over for Tony.” By Kerry O'Neil. 72 pages. First line: "Shorty Kane was standing at the door of the "Boxing Booth" with the proprietor, Al Plum.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          14          "All Redheads are Beautiful.” By John T. McIntyre. 21 pages. 
First line: "The desk, full of wind-driven rain, was settling over the little whistle stop…” (Typescript) (2 copies)

18          15          "An Ice-Cold Gun: (James Butler Hickock).” By Kerry O'Neil. 24 pages.
First line: "James Butler Hickock and Sam Colt's revolver came into life at about the same time…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          16          "An Ice-Cold Gun: (James Butler Hickock).” By Kerry O'Neil. 24 pages.
First line: "James Butler Hickock and Sam Colt's revolver came into life at about the same time…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          17          "An Ice-Cold Gun: (James Butler Hickock).” By Kerry O'Neil. 24 pages.
First line: "James Butler Hickock and Sam Colt's revolver came into life at about the same time…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          18          "An Ice-Cold Gun: (James Butler Hickock).” By Kerry O'Neil. 24 pages.
First line: "James Butler Hickock and Sam Colt's revolver came into life at about the same time…” (Typescript)          Undated

18          19          "An Official Trigger: (Pat Garrett).” By Kerry O'Neil. 19 pages. First line: "When the Civil War was fought out and the West began to take shape, its human product became more highly specialized.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          20          "An Official Trigger: (Pat Garrett).” By Kerry O'Neil. 19 pages. First line: "When the Civil War was fought out and the West began to take shape, its human product became more highly specialized.” (Typescript)          Undated

18          21          "An Official Trigger: (Pat Garrett).” By Kerry O'Neil. 19 pages. First line: "When the Civil War was fought out and the West began to take shape, its human product became more highly specialized.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          1          "Appointment at Nine.” By Kerry O'Neil. 21 pages. First line: "'Send my car around,' telephoned Alice Graham to the garageman.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          2          "Appointment at Nine.” By Kerry O'Neil. 21 pages. First line: "'Send my car around,' telephoned Alice Graham to the garageman.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          3          "'Arriet Makes a Call: A Story of Three Christmas Eves.” By John T. McIntyre. 113 pages. First line: "The snow had been falling all afternoon; and now night had come on and it was falling still.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          4          "'Arriet Makes a Call: A Story of Three Christmas Eves.” By John T. McIntyre. 113 pages. First line: "The snow had been falling all afternoon; and now night had come on and it was falling still.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          5          "As the Clock Struck Two.” By John T. McIntyre. 67 pages. First line: "Duddington liked October mornings; they were so often bright and invigorating.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          6          "As the Clock Struck Two.” By John T. McIntyre. 67 pages. First line: "Duddington liked October mornings; they were so often bright and invigorating.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          7          "As the Clock Struck Two.” By John T. McIntyre. 67 pages. First line: "Duddington liked October mornings; they were so often bright and invigorating.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          8          "At Two Eight.” By John T. McIntyre. 12 pages. First line: "Amos Smith arose from his bed.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          9          "At Two Eight.” By John T. McIntyre. 12 pages. First line: "Amos Smith arose from his bed.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          10          "At 2:08.” By John T. McIntyre. 12 pages. First line: "Amos Smith arose from his bed.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          11          "Beaumarchais.” By John T. McIntyre. 106 pages. First line: "Rain!  All day it fell, and all day the wind drove.” (Typescript)          Undated

19          12          "Blackmail.” By Kerry O'Neil. 23 pages. First line: "The telephone buzzed and Jerry Mooney took it up.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

20          1          "Blowing Weather.” By John T. McIntyre. 407 pages. First line: "Anthony Stevens paused on the broad door-stone of the Black Horse Tavern, and looked up and down Second Street.” The Century and Co., New York and London          1923

20          2          "Blowing Weather.” By John T. McIntyre. 407 pages. First line: "Anthony Stevens paused on the broad door-stone of the Black Horse Tavern, and looked up and down Second Street.” The Century and Co., New York and London          1923

20          3          "Blows.” By John T. McIntyre. 5 pages. First line: "Henry had lifted like a dark star in the west…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

20          4          "Captain Potwa Takes a Cut.” By Kerry O'Neil. 29 pages. First line: "Captain Earnest Potwa, of the New Orleans steam "Gum" Meteor…” (2 copies)          Undated

20          5          "Cargo from Torcoado.” By Kerry O'Neil. 19 pages. First line: "Tommy Joyce was glad when the Caravan cleared at the port of Jacinto.” (Typescript)          Undated

20          6          "Cargo from Torcoado.” By Kerry O'Neil. 19 pages. First line: "Tommy Joyce was glad when the Caravan cleared at the port of Jacinto.” (Typescript)          Undated

20          7          "Cargo from Torcoado.” By Kerry O'Neil. 24 pages. First line: "When the Caravan cleared at the port of Jacinto…” (Typescript)          Undated

20          8          "The Cartridge Kid.” By Kerry O'Neil. 89 pages. First line: "Desert Rim stood on the spot where the sands touched the foot of the Solomon Range…” (Typescript)          Undated

20          9          "The Chartress Table.” By John T. McIntyre. 6 pages. First line: "New Orleans in the middle 50's. A rich port. A gay city.” (Typescript)          Undated

20          10          "The Chartress Table.” By John T. McIntyre. 6 pages. First line: "New Orleans in the middle 50's. A rich port. A gay city.” (Typescript)          Undated

21          1          "Chorpenning House.” By John T. McIntyre. 76 pages. First line: "Mary and Oliver listened very willingly as old Gregory told them about Chorpenning House.” (Typescript)          Undated
21          2          "Chorpenning House.” By John T. McIntyre. 76 pages. First line: "Mary and Oliver listened very willingly as old Gregory told them about Chorpenning House.” (Typescript)          Undated

21          3          "Confidence: A Short Short Story.” By John T. McIntyre. 6 pages.

First line: "Collins went into the office to strap up his sample cases…” (Typescript)          Undated

21          4          "Confidence: A Short Short Story.” By John T. McIntyre. 6 pages.

First line: "Collins went into the office to strap up his sample cases…” (Typescript)          Undated

21          5          "Death at Dakar.” 1 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. 110 pages. First line: "The British and Free French warships off Dakar were throwing shells…” (Typescript)          Undated

21          6          "Death at Dakar.” 2 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. Pp. 111-215. 
First line: "… beautifully kept fingers patted Patricia's hand.” (Typescript)          Undated

21          7          "Death Came Swiftly.” By Kerry O'Neil. 89 pages. First line: "There was a light rain falling, and the wet pavement reflected things with garish distortions.” (Typescript)          Undated

21          8          "Death Came Swiftly.” By Kerry O'Neil. 89 pages. First line: "There was a light rain falling, and the wet pavement reflected things with garish distortions.” (Typescript)          Undated

21          9          "Distant Drums." Part 1 of 4. By John T. McIntyre. 161 pages. Chapters I-XV. First line: "Young Terry Fife was stropping his razor and whistling…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

21          10          "Distant Drums." Part 2 of 4. Pages 162-327. Chapters XVI-XXX. First line: "At the Hotel Europe, Terry sat down with Shag Nolan…” (Typescript)          Undated

21          11          "Distant Drums." Part 3 of 4. Pages 328-490. Chapters XXXI-LI. First line: "The French army had been received on board its ships and sailed out of the gulf…” (Typescript)          Undated

21          12          "Distant Drums." Part 4 of 4. Pages 491-662. Chapters LII-LXX. First line: "Bud Hedges, well set up, smiling, was outside with Perry…” (Typescript)          Undated

22          1          "Dope.” By John T. McIntyre. 25 pages. First line: "There was a quiet ring at the apartment bell.” (Typescript)          Undated

22          2          "The Dragon Balcony.” By John T. McIntyre. 93 pages. First line: "The Devil-shop of the wizard, Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

22          3          "The Dragon Balcony.” By John T. McIntyre. 100 pages. First line: "Poy An came out of the apothecary shop of Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

22          4          "The Dragon Balcony.” By John T. McIntyre. 100 pages. First line: "Poy An came out of the apothecary shop of Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

22          5          "Eagles in the Sun.” By John T. McIntyre. 125 pages. First line: "This was the month of January, 1860, and I was in the city of New Orleans.” (Typescript)          Undated

22          6          "Eagles in the Sun.” By John T. McIntyre. 125 pages. First line: "This was the month of January, 1860, and I was in the city of New Orleans.” (Typescript)          Undated

22          7          "Eagles in the Sun." [author not named.] First line: "I'll tell you this as I'll tell you many other tings…” (Typescript)          Undated

22          8          "Eagles in the Sun." [author not named.] First line: "'… impatient,' she said, contriving to smile.” (Notes, draft) (Holograph)          Undated

22          9          "Eddie Shows Them How.” By Kerry O'Neil. Incomplete. Various pages from 18-136. First line from page 18: "'… and we'd get a hat full of dough.'“ (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

23          1          "Elsa's Children.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Karen Walters sat at a big, sunlit widow…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

23          2          "Enchantment.” By John T. McIntyre. 137 pages. First line: "Bassett sat very upright in the corner of the sofa…” (Typescript)          Undated

23          3          "Enchantment.” By John T. McIntyre. 137 pages. First line: "Bassett sat very upright in the corner of the sofa…” (Typescript)          Undated

23          4          "The Experience at the Pasture Gate.” By Kerry O'Neil. 30 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney had been working on the tag end of a forgery case…” (Typescript)          Undated

23          5          "The Experience at the Pasture Gate.” By Kerry O'Neil. 30 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney had been working on the tag end of a forgery case…” (Typescript)          Undated

23          6          "The Experience at Beauchamp, Gowns.” By Kerry O'Neil. 74 pages. First line: "Ates Haley, Jerry Mooney's office boy…” (Typescript)          Undated

23          7          "The Experience at Beauchamp, Gowns.” By Kerry O'Neil. 74 pages. First line: "Ates Haley, Jerry Mooney's office boy…” (Typescript)          Undated

23          8          "Fast Work.” By Kerry O'Neil. 92 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney shot up in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower.” (Typescript)          Undated

23          9          "Fast Work.” By Kerry O'Neil. 92 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney shot up in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower.” (Typescript)          Undated

23          10          "Fast Work.” By Kerry O'Neil. 92 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney shot up in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower.” (Typescript)          Undated

23          11          "Fear.” By John T. McIntyre. 4 pages. First line: "It was a morning filled with sunshine and cheerfully blowing wind.” (Typescript)          Undated

23          12          "Fear.” By John T. McIntyre. 4 pages. First line: "It was a morning filled with sunshine and cheerfully blowing wind.” (Typescript)          Undated

23          13          "Front.” By John T. McIntyre. 108 pages. First line: "It was Jonesy who showed Elsa Godwin into the outer room of the personnel offices of Henderson Bliss.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

23          14          "Front.” By John T. McIntyre. 1 of 2. (Parts I-IV). 109 pages. First line: "Mortimer, butler to Henderson Bliss…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          1          "Front.” By John T. McIntyre. 2 of 2. (Parts V-VIII). Pages 110-226. 
First line: "Hendy was busily engaged with Jones when young Lewis came in.” (Typescript)          Undated

24          2          "Front." [no author named.] Pages unordered/miscellaneous. First line: "… the flowers. But that has been remedied.” (Typescript)          Undated

24          3          "Front." [no author named.] Pages unordered/miscellaneous. First line: "… the flowers. But that has been remedied.” (Typescript)          Undated

24          4          "The Golden Bullet.” By John T. McIntyre. 90 pages. First line: "'To be sure of a thing,' said But Scanlon, 'don't prove that it is so.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

24          5          "Gong!: An Account of the Art of Boxing from the Beginning to the Present Time.” By John T. McIntyre. 240 pages. First line: "In the public games of Greece and Rome, when the populace had tired of the armed gladiators…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          6          "Gong!: An Account of the Art of Boxing from the Beginning to the Present Time.” By John T. McIntyre. 240 pages. First line: "In the public games of Greece and Rome, when the populace had tired of the armed gladiators…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          7          "Gong!: An Account of the Art of Boxing from the Beginning to the Present Time.” By John T. McIntyre. 240 pages. First line: "In the public games of Greece and Rome, when the populace had tired of the armed gladiators…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          8          "Gun Slingin' at Highpockets.” By Kerry O'Neil. 18 pages. First line: "I've never liked these Sacramento mountains,' complained Bulge McCoy…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          9          "Gun Slingin' at Highpockets.” By Kerry O'Neil. 18 pages. First line: "I've never liked these Sacramento mountains,' complained Bulge McCoy…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          10          "Gun Slingin' at Highpockets.” By Kerry O'Neil. 18 pages. First line: "I've never liked these Sacramento mountains,' complained Bulge McCoy…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          11          "Gun Smoke.” By Kerry O'Neil. 158 pages. First line: "Steve Corey had a shot-gun clamped in the jaws of the vice…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          12          "Gun Smoke.” By Kerry O'Neil. 158 pages. First line: "Steve Corey had a shot-gun clamped in the jaws of the vice…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          13          "Halliday Makes a Call.” By Kerry O'Neil. 13 pages. First line: "Halliday loosened the gun in the holster under his left arm…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          14          "Halliday Makes a Call.” By Kerry O'Neil. 13 pages. First line: "Halliday loosened the gun in the holster under his left arm…” (Typescript)          Undated

24          15          "The Hand of Glory.” By John T. McIntyre. 16 pages. First line: "The clerks and porters had already gone…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          1          "Hanging a Hook on Irving.” By Kerry O'Neil. 39 pages. First line: "Harmony Hall was filled with the smoke of thousands of cigars and cigarettes…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          2          "Hanging a Hook on Irving.” By Kerry O'Neil. 39 pages. First line: "Harmony Hall was filled with the smoke of thousands of cigars and cigarettes…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          3          "Hanging a Hook on Irving.” By Kerry O'Neil. 39 pages. First line: "Harmony Hall was filled with the smoke of thousands of cigars and cigarettes…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          4          "Hanging a Hook on Irving.” By Kerry O'Neil. 39 pages. First line: "Harmony Hall was filled with the smoke of thousands of cigars and cigarettes…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          5          "Hanging a Hook on Irving.” By Kerry O'Neil. 39 pages. First line: "Harmony Hall was filled with the smoke of thousands of cigars and cigarettes…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          6          “He Couldn’t Forget Her.” By John. T. McIntyre. First line: “As Grace Whitney walked down…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          7          "Heralds of Conquest." [author not named.] 133 pages. First line: "The United States Flag flew over the Army and Navy Building…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          8          "Herby.” By Kerry O'Neil. 6 pages. First line: "This Mrs. Davidge, who has the news stand at 49th Street…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          9         "Herby.” By Kerry O'Neil. 6 pages. First line: "This Mrs. Davidge, who has the news stand at 49th Street…” (Typescript)          Undated

25          10          "Hired at San Pedro.” By Kerry O'Neil. 28 pages. First line: "'How often," said Talk Tanner, "have I told you to keep away from cards?"'  (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

25          11          "It was Later than He Thought.” By John T. McIntyre. 18 pages. First line: "George Herbert Springer stood at the buffet…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

25          12          "Jane Ann." [no author named.] 20 pages. First line: "It was a winter evening, and Jane Ann sat…” (Typescript, with holograph notes)          Undated

25          13          "The Jethroe Jewels.” By John T. McIntyre. 23 pages. First line: "That February night was the bitterest in my experience.” (Typescript)          Undated

25          14          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 1 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. 87 pages. 
First line: "I remember that morning very well.” (Typescript)          Undated

25          15          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 1 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. 87 pages. 
First line: "I remember that morning very well.” (Typescript)          Undated

25          16          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 1 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. 87 pages. 
First line: "I remember that morning very well.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          1          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 2 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 88-174.
First line: "And now I come to a place in my story where I must let someone else talk.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          2          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 2 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 88-174.
First line: "And now I come to a place in my story where I must let someone else talk.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          3          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 2 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 88-174.
First line: "And now I come to a place in my story where I must let someone else talk.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          4          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 3 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 175-253.
First line: "This is Jimmy Davis now talking to you.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          5          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 3 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 175-253.
First line: "This is Jimmy Davis now talking to you.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          6          "Jimmy Davis Returns." Part 3 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 175-253.
First line: "This is Jimmy Davis now talking to you.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          7          "Jimmy's Mother.” By Kerry O'Neil. 7 pages. First line: "Joyce said the little house was beautiful!” (Typescript)          Undated

26          8          "Jimmy's Mother.” By Kerry O'Neil. 7 pages. First line: "Joyce said the little house was beautiful!” (Typescript)          Undated

26          9          "Joe, Jack and Jim.” By Kerry O'Neil. 113 pages. First line: "One time there were three young men who were lost in some high hills.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          10          "Joe, Jack and Jim.” By Kerry O'Neil. 113 pages. First line: "One time there were three young men who were lost in some high hills.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          11          "Joe, Jack and Jim.” By Kerry O'Neil. 116 pages. First line: "One time there were three boys who were lost in some high hills.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          12          "Joe, Jack and Jim.” By Kerry O'Neil. 116 pages. First line: "One time there were three boys who were lost in some high hills.” (Typescript)          Undated

26          13          "Joe, Jack and Jim.” By Kerry O'Neil. 116 pages. First line: "One time there were three boys who were lost in some high hills.” (Typescript)          Undated

27          1          "Johnnie Spargo & Co." Part 1 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. 87 pages.
First line: "The big Godfrey truck which the boys of the…” (Typescript)          Undated

27          2          "Johnnie Spargo & Co." Part 1 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. 87 pages.
First line: "The big Godfrey truck which the boys of the…” (Typescript)          Undated

27          3          "Johnnie Spargo & Co." Part 1 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. 87 pages.
First line: "The big Godfrey truck which the boys of the…” (Typescript)          Undated

27          4          "Johnnie Spargo & Co." Part 2 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 87-178.
First line: "By and by Johnnie noted that the two men had given up their search of the car.” (Typescript)          Undated

27          5          "Johnnie Spargo & Co." Part 2 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 87-178.
First line: "By and by Johnnie noted that the two men had given up their search of the car.” (Typescript)          Undated

27          6          "Johnnie Spargo & Co." Part 2 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. Pages 87-178.
First line: "By and by Johnnie noted that the two men had given up their search of the car.” (Typescript)          Undated

27          7          "Lady of the Vaqueros.” By ??  155 pages. First line: "Many glances were cast in the direction of the two horsemen who rode down the Avenida Luciernaga…” (Typescript)          Undated

27          8          "Little Goldie." [no author named.] 238 pages. First line: "Three beautiful girls sat at a luncheon table…” (Typescript) (3 copies)          Undated

27          9          "Little Goldie." [no author named.] First line: "Open this: Conversation between groups of people.” (Holograph)          Undated

28          1          "Little Goldie." [no author named.] (Holograph)          Undated

28          2          "Little Goldie." [no author named.] (Holograph)          Undated

28          3          "Little Goldie." [no author named.] (Holograph)          Undated

28          4          "Money Talks. Series of Short Stories.” 1 sheet of a list of titles. (Holograph)          Undated

28          5          "Murder at Pelham." [1 of 2.] By Kerry O'Neil. 110 pages, chapters I-XIV.
First line: "Jerry Mooney, of Collins & Mooney, Private Detectives, sat tipped back in his chair.” (Typescript)          Undated

28          6          "Murder at Pelham." [2 of 2.] By Kerry O'Neil. Pages 111-218, chapters XV-XXVI. First line: "Jerry Mooney and Hilda Barnes were hurrying through the vast waiting-room…” (Typescript)          Undated

28          7          "Murder in the Ten-Two-Six.” By Kerry O'Neil. 69 pages. First line: Jerry Mooney shot upward in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower…” (Typescript)          Undated

28          8          "Murder in the Ten-Two-Six.” By Kerry O'Neil. 69 pages. First line: Jerry Mooney shot upward in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower…” (Typescript)          Undated

28          9          "Murder in the Ten-Two-Six.” By Kerry O'Neil. 69 pages. First line: Jerry Mooney shot upward in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower…” (Typescript)          Undated

28          10          "Murder in the Ten-Two-Six.” By Kerry O'Neil. 69 pages. First line: Jerry Mooney shot upward in one of the express elevators of the Bergman Tower…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          1          "Murder Most Foul." [1 of 2.] By Kerry O'Neil. 99 pages, chapters I-XV. 
First line: "When I went into the little room which Tom Burke called his laboratory…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          2          "Murder Most Foul." [2 of 2.] Pages 100-187, chapters XVI-XXVIII. 
First line: "The April dusk was settling upon the fields as our cap whirled along…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          3          "My Soul is among Lions (Psalms, LVII).” By John T. McIntyre. 38 pages.
First line: "Bad luck had tracked Danny Nolan here and there for some time…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          4          "My Soul is among Lions (Psalms, LVII).” By John T. McIntyre. 38 pages.
First line: "Bad luck had tracked Danny Nolan here and there for some time…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          5          "Nemesis of the Primitive.” Author not named. 14 pages. First line: "Out of the east a Chinook blew softly, gradually strengthening until its continued warmth melted the hard crust of the snow.” (Typescript)          Undated

29          6          "Night Fares.” By Kerry O'Neil. 10 pages. First line: "It was about eleven forty and I'd just crossed Fifth Sixth Street when I saw her.” (Typescript)          Undated

29          7          "Ninth Floor: Middle City Tower." [1 of 2.] By Kerry O'Neil. Pages 1-116, chapters I-XIII. First line: "Mickey always said the music at the Algerian Moon was "just dandy.” (Typescript)          Undated

29          8          "Ninth Floor: Middle City Tower." [2 of 2.] Pages 117-225, chapters XIV-XXVII. First line: "McCallum Street, directly behind Middle City Tower, was quite narrow…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          9          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Outline/treatment. [no author named.] 8 pages. First line: "Outline of a proposed trilogy of novels, built against a background of early American transportation.” (Typescript)          Undated

29          10          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Part 1. By John T. McIntyre. 155 pages. Chapters I-XVII. First line: "The shebeen, as Davey Melody called his tavern…” First heading: "The Book of Simon.” (Typescript)          Undated

29          11          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Part 2. Pages 156-300. Chapters XVIII-XXXVIII. First line: "Time passed; and Owen grew into boyhood." (Typescript)         Undated

29          12          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Part 3. Chapters XXVIII-XLVIII. Pages 301-441. First line: "Owen Abernathy managed, by one means or another…” (Typescript)          Undated

29          13          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Part 4. Chapters XLIX-LXII. Pages 442-594. First line: "Six years had passed.” (Typescript)          Undated

30          1          “O Land of Milk and Honet.” Notes. (Typescript)          Undated

30          2          “O Land of Milk and Honey.” Notes. (Typescript)          Undated

30          3          “O Land of Milk and Honey.” Various pages. (Typescript)          Undated

30          4          “O Land of Milk and Honey.” [Incomplete copy.] (Typescript)          Undated

30          5          “O Land of Milk and Honey.” Part 5. Chapters LXIII-LXXV. Pages 595-735. First line: "As Denis ate his supper he frowned and cogitated…” (Typescript)          Undated

30          6          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Various disordered pages, to 735. (Typescript)          Undated

30          7          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Various disordered pages, to 735. (Typescript)          Undated

30          8          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Various disordered pages, to 735. (Typescript)          Undated

30          9          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Various disordered pages, to 735. (Typescript)          Undated

30          10          "O Land of Milk and Honey.” Various disordered pages, to 735. (Typescript)          Undated

31          1          "The Old Weekly Story Papers.” By John T. McIntyre. 38 pages and 5 pages of notes. First line: "The trouble began some years ago when a sale was cried at a well-known book auction placed in New York City.” (Typescript; notes hand-written)          Undated

31          2          "Oliver had Left his Home.” By John T. McIntyre. 204 pages. First line: "As Grace Whitney walked down between the lines of tables at the Argentine…” (Typescript)          Undated

31          3          "On the Jericho Road.” By Kerry O'Neil. 21 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney drew his car up before the courthouse at Tutts town, country seat of Burgess.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          4          "On the Jericho Road.” By Kerry O'Neil. 21 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney drew his car up before the courthouse at Tutts town, country seat of Burgess.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          5          "On the Jericho Road.” By Kerry O'Neil. 21 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney drew his car up before the courthouse at Tutts town, country seat of Burgess.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          6          "On the Roof Tops.” By Kerry O'Neil. 9 pages. First line: "It was quite dark. A bell in a tower somewhere…” (Typescript)          Undated

31          7          "Peixoto's Invitation." [author not named.] Pages 134-286. First line: "All in the riding school pressed forward at Shannon's action…” (Typescript)          Undated

31          8          "Pickering's Wax Lady.” By John T. McIntyre. 8 pages. First line: "Pickering was on his way to lunch.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          9          "Platinum.” By John T. McIntyre. 5 pages. First line: "Sadie Frusch re-arranged the music on her piano…” (Typescript) (3 copies)          Undated

31          10          "Plunder.” By John T. McIntyre. 22-24 pages. First line: "The night was cold, and the doorway gave Chubby but little shelter.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          11          "Plunder.” By John T. McIntyre. 22-24 pages. First line: "The night was cold, and the doorway gave Chubby but little shelter.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          12          "Plunder.” By John T. McIntyre. 22-24 pages. First line: "The night was cold, and the doorway gave Chubby but little shelter.” (Typescript)          Undated

31          13          "Pooch: The Story of a Stray.” By John T. McIntyre. 141 pages. First line: "The dog shop was on Main Street…” (Typescript)          Undated

31          14          "Pooch: The Story of a Stray.” By John T. McIntyre. 141 pages. First line: "The dog shop was on Main Street…” (Typescript)          Undated

31          15          "Pooch: The Story of a Stray.” By John T. McIntyre. 147 pages. First line: "The dog shop was in Main Street…” (Typescript)          Undated

31          16          "Pooch: The Story of a Stray.” By John T. McIntyre. 147 pages. First line: "The dog shop was in Main Street…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          1          "Poy An.” By John T. McIntyre. 78 pages. First line: "Along a narrow Shanghai street in the native section…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          2          "Poy An.” By John T. McIntyre. 78 pages. First line: "Along a narrow Shanghai street in the native section…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          3          "Purdy.” By John T. McIntyre. 5 pages. First line: "At the time I'm telling about, Purdy was about twenty-four…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          4          "Purdy.” By John T. McIntyre. 5 pages. First line: "At the time I'm telling about, Purdy was about twenty-four…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          5          "The Ranger.” By John T. McIntyre and C.M. Stuart. 20 pages. First line: "Frank Deering, Captain of the Texas Rangers…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          6          "Red.” By John J. McIntyre. 17 pages. First line: "The first time I saw Red he was sitting…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          7          "The Remarkable Case of Geordie M'Cambridge.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: (after a quote by Shakespeare): "One blustering December [sic] night, a small party of bachelors were seated about the table…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          8          "Retrieved.” By John T. McIntyre. 25 pages. First line: "There was a quiet ring at the apartment bell.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          9          "Rolling into the Sun.” No author named. 8 pages. First line: "Outline of a proposed trilogy of novels, built against a background of early American transportation.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          10          "Roulette.” By John T. McIntyre. Pages 9-18. First line: "… always be prying about?” (Typescript)          Undated

32          11          "Roulette.” By John T. McIntyre. 27 pages. First line: "There was a little room just off the head of the staircase at Heatherington's…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          12          "Roulette.” By John T. McIntyre. 27 pages. First line: "There was a little room just off the head of the staircase at Heatherington's…” (Typescript)          Undated

32          13          "Sam Snaps them Down.” By Kerry O'Neil. 20 pages. First line: "Skibby was looking out of a club-house window…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

32          14          "Same Day, Same Hour.” By John T. McIntyre. 8 pages. First line: "On the 5:06 to Stanwick Babson and Keller always shared a seat.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          15          "Same Day, Same Hour.” By John T. McIntyre. 11 pages. First line: "On the 5:06 to Stanwick, Babson and Keller always shared a seat.” (Holograph)          Undated

32          16          "Same Day, Same Hour.” By John T. McIntyre. 8 pages. First line: "On the 5:06 to Stanwick, Babson and Keller always shared a seat.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          17          "Same Day, Same Hour.” By John T. McIntyre. 8 pages. First line: "On the 5:06 to Stanwick, Babson and Keller always shared a seat.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          18          "The Scarsdale Mystery." Part 1 of 2. By Kerry O'Neil 129 pages. First line: "'What do you think of it, Manny?' said Tom Burke to me.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          19          "The Scarsdale Mystery." Part 2 of 2. By Kerry O'Neil. Pages 130-244. First line: "After dinner that evening, Tom looked over the last edition of the papers.” (Typescript)          Undated

32          20          "The Scarsdale Mystery.” By Kerry O'Neil. Pages 3-244, not complete. First line: "… by the merest chance.” (Typescript)          Undated

33          1          "Sea-Dream.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Stella Bradford knelt beside one of the flower beds in the front garden…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          2          "Sea-Dream.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Stella Bradford knelt beside one of the flower beds in the front garden…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          3          "The Second Story Man.” By John T. McIntyre. 5 pages. First line: "From across the mist buttressed housetops a bell boomed through the fine rain."          Undated

33          4          "The Shadow in the Garden.” By John T. McIntyre. 6 pages. First line: "As I remember the morning, it was dim and sad colored…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          5          "Shanghai.” By John T. McIntyre. 78 pages. First line: "Along a narrow Shanghai street in the native section,…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          6          "Shannon, of Nome." [no author named.] 2 pages. First line: "A man, John Jay kills and mobs…” (Holograph)          Undated

33          7          "She Hadn't Thought of This.” By John T. McIntyre. 19 pages. First line: "You know how it is at noon around Broad and Chestnut.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

33          8          "Signing Off.” By John T. McIntyre. 2 pages. First line: "This is a spot in the novel "Signing Off" which may be the germ of a play.” (Typescript) (3 copies)          Undated

33          9          "Signing Off.” By John T. McIntyre. 303 pages. First line: "Otto called Booth No. 1 at his place the "beer and business' booth…” (Page proofs, bound)          Undated

33          10          "Signing Off.” No author named. 1 page. First line: "It was ten o'clock. Dalton, as he walked back to his rectory…” (Galley sheet)          Undated

33          11          "The Silent Brotherhood: A Series of Ten Stories. No. 2: The Affair of the Crooked Gambler.” By John T. McIntyre. 17 pages. First line: "The gown shop of Madame Marcel was in Fifth Avenue, and was an establishment patronized by the most fashionable.” (Typescript)          Undated

33          12          "The Silent Brotherhood: A Series of Ten Stories. No. 3: The Affair of the Safety First.” 19 pages. First line: "Steve Dallas sat in the lobby of the Parkside, a cigar clinched between his strong teeth…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          13          "The Silent Brotherhood: A Series of Ten Stories. No. 4: The Affair of the Gunnison Share.” 18 pages. First line: "At a mirror in his dressing room overlooking the park, Ken Sheridan carefully arranged his scarf…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          14          "The Silent Brotherhood: A Series of Ten Stories. No. 5: The Affair of the One Thousand Per Cent.” 18 pages. "The incandescent lamps, pendant from the ceiling of the underground council chamber of the Silent Brotherhood…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          15          "The Silent Brotherhood: A Series of Ten Stories. No. 5: The Affair of the One Thousand Per Cent.” 18 pages. "The incandescent lamps, pendant from the ceiling of the underground council chamber of the Silent Brotherhood…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          16          "Six-Guns of Spyglass.” By Kerry O'Neil. 78 pages. First line: "As the big Gregory truck which the drivers of the Texas & Northwest Trucking Co. called Sliding Susan…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          17          "Six-Guns of Spyglass.” By Kerry O'Neil. 78 pages. First line: "As the big Gregory truck which the drivers of the Texas & Northwest Trucking Co. called Sliding Susan…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          18          "Sixshooting at Horseshoe.” By Kerry O'Neil. 28 pages. First line: "There was the whine of a rifle shot…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          19          "Sixshooting at Horseshoe.” By Kerry O'Neil. 28 pages. First line: "There was the whine of a rifle shot…” (Typescript)          Undated

33          20          "Sixshooting at Horseshoe.” By Kerry O'Neil. 28 pages. First line: "There was the whine of a rifle shot…” (Typescript)          Undated

34          1          "Skibby Signs Two.” By Kerry O'Neil. 24 pages. First line: "It's on March 8th and I get a wire from Danbury.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

34          2          "Snapping Them Down.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Skibby's piecing out the end of the season managing the Striped Socks…” (Typescript. 2 copies).

34          3          "Some Added Notes on 221B.” By John T. McIntyre. 12 pages. First line: "Maybe some of you'll remember me?” (Typescript)          Undated

34          4          "Some Added Notes on 221B.” By John T. McIntyre. 21 pages. (Holograph)          Undated

34          5          "Some Added Notes in 221B." [author not named.] 4 pages. First line: "The meeting of Watson and Holmes.” (Holograph)          Undated

34          6          "Some Added Notes in 221B." [author not named.] 4 pages. First line: "The meeting of Watson and Holmes.” (Holograph)          Undated

34          7          "Some Added Notes in 221B." [author not named.] 4 pages. First line: "The meeting of Watson and Holmes.” (Holograph)          Undated

34          8          "Some Days in the World." Part 1 of 4. By John T. McIntyre. 110 pages. First line: "'There will always be a good deal of wine in the world…"'  (Typescript)          Undated

34          9          "Some Days in the World." Part 2 of 4. Pages 110-231. First line: "Durkens place was in a narrow street.” (Typescript)          Undated

34          10          "Some Days in the World." Part 3 of 4. Pages 232-335. First line: "Lefty saw a good deal of Andy Daily during this period.” (Typescript)          Undated

34          11          "Some Days in the World." Part 4 of 4. Pages 336-434. First line: "Jean Eves and Lefty were visiting at Portlock House.” (Typescript)          Undated

34          12          "Some Ways in the World." 1 of 6. By John T. McIntyre. 96 pages. First line: "'There will always be a good deal of wine sold…” (Holograph)          Undated

34          13          "Some Ways in the World." 2 of 6. Pages 97-215. First line:"… disappeared through a door at the back of the loft…  (Holograph)          Undated

34          14          "Some Ways in the World." 3 of 6. Pages 216-339. First line: "… what he thought her sturdiness of character…” (Holograph)          Undated

35          1          "Some Ways in the World." 4 of 6. Pages 340-471 1/4. First line: "You're making quite a competent rascal of him," said Casbrey.” (Holograph)          Undated

35          2          "Some Ways in the World." 5 of 6. Pages 472-605. First line: "'About Miss Portlock,' he said.” (Holograph)          Undated

35          3          "Some Ways in the World." 6 of 6. Pages 606-715. First line: "… as fine and clear as those God wrote into the Holy Books.” (Holograph)          Undated

35          4          "Someone to Pickle Them.” By Kerry O'Neil. 33 pages. First line: "What I mean to say is we had a short right field fence.” (Typescript)          Undated

35          5          "Someone to Pickle Them.” By Kerry O'Neil. 33 pages. First line: "What I mean to say is we had a short right field fence.” (Typescript)          Undated

35          6          "Someone to Sock Them.” By Kerry O'Neil. 33 pages. First line: "What I mean to say is we had…” (Typescript)          Undated

35          7          "Soup, Fish and Estelle.” By John T. McIntyre. 21 pages. First line: "Steve Mace carried the bucket and towels and bottles up the aisle from the Waltz-Dream Arena.” (Typescript)          Undated

35          8          "The Stars and Stripes: Being a History, in Motion Pictures, of the American Flag: Showing Old Glory in all the Thrilling Incidents in Which it Figured, From It's [sic] Adoption in 1777 to the present time.” "Material Collected and Offered by John T. McIntyre & Wm. D. Reel.” 14 pages. First line: "In the period, from the outbreak of hostilities between the American colonies and English in 1775…” (Typescript)          Undated

35          9          "Stepping Ahead of Eddie.” By Kerry O'Neil. 17 pages. First line: "When Jerry Mooney let himself into his office in the Bergman Tower it was after dark.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

35          10          "Stepping Around: A Theatrical--Prize-Ring--Gangster Story.” By John T. McIntyre. 168 pages. First line: "Broadway steamed by, noisy, and with its innumerable lights beating upon it…  (Typescript)          Undated

35          11          "Stork over Gramercy.” By John T. McIntyre. 117 pages. First line: "Dawson was working on what she hoped would be a neat little job of word building…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

35          12          "Stork over Gramercy.” By John T. McIntyre. 117 pages. First line: "Dawson was working on what she hoped would be a neat little job of word building…” (Typescript)          Undated

36          1          "Stork over Gramercy.” By John T. McIntyre. 117 pages. First line: "Dawson was working on what she hoped would be a neat little job of word building…” (Typescript)          Undated

36          2          "Strain.” By John T. McIntyre. 7 pages. First line: "Spencer had looked at the clock in his office at a little before ten…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

36          3          "Strangers Within Our Gates. By John T. McIntyre. 137 pages. First line: "Two officers were to be billeted at Novie's house…” (Typescript)          Undated

36          4          "Strangers Within Our Gates. By John T. McIntyre. 137 pages. First line: "Two officers were to be billeted at Novie's house…” (Typescript)          Undated

36          5          "Strangers Within Our Gates. By John T. McIntyre. 137 pages. First line: "Two officers were to be billeted at Novie's house…” (Typescript)          Undated

36          6          "Sub-Literature: A Review of the old Weekly Story Papers.” By John T. McIntyre. 39 pages. First line: "On the tenth day of May in the year 1920…” (Typescript)

36          7          "Sub-Literature: A Review of the old Weekly Story Papers.” By John T. McIntyre. 39 pages. First line: "On the tenth day of May in the year 1920…” (Typescript)

36          8          "Tangled Flags.” By John T. McIntyre. 96 pages. First line: "It was one morning, about a week after Terry Fife's arrival…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

36          9          "Tangled Flags.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "It was one morning, about a week after…” (Typescript/holograph, notes)          Undated

36          10          "Tangled Flags.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Shag and Terry in hotel room.” (Holograph; Outline, notes)          Undated

36          11          "Tangled Flags.” [Miscellaneous manuscript pages.] (Typescript)          Undated

37          1          "Terror in the Night." Part One of Two. By Kerry O'Neil. 117 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney came into the office of Collins & Mooney with dragging tread.” (Typescript)          Undated

37          2          "Terror in the Night." Part Two of Two. Pages 118 to 222. First line: "… complete, only needing some acting on the part of your assumed character.” (Typescript)          Undated

37          3          "That Chandler Girl." [author not named.] Various pages. First line: "… suddenly that they mostly belonged to her…” (Holograph)          Undated

37          4          "That Chandler Girl." [author not named.] Various pages. (Holograph)          Undated

37          5          "That Chandler Girl." [author not named.] Various pages. (Holograph)          Undated

37          6          "That Chandler Girl." [author not named.] Various pages. (Holograph)          Undated

37          7          “That Chandler Girl." Part 1 of 3. By John T. McIntyre. 99 pages. First line: "Modoc Jones, in a shabby station wagon, and driving a pair of handsome, blooded mares…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

37          8          "That Chandler Girl." Part 2 of 3. Pages 100 to 208. First line: "It was after dark on that same night…” (Typescript)          Undated

37          9          "That Chandler Girl." Part 3 of 3. Pages 209 to 309. First line: "Sally Jo awoke rather late on the morning after the Sharon races…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          1          "That Chandler Girl." Part 3 of 3. (Typescript)          Undated

38          2          "There were Three in All." Part 1 of 3. By Kerry O'Neil. 78 pages. First line: "It was a rainy, dismal night, and past the hour of closing the office.” (Typescript)          Undated

38          3          "There were Three in All." Part 2 of 3. Pages 79-156. First line: "After leaving the Calumet, Jerry Mooney took a cab…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          4          "There were Three in All." Part 2 of 3. Pages 79-156. First line: "After leaving the Calumet, Jerry Mooney took a cab…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          5          "There were Three in All." Part 3 of 3. Pages 157-238. First line: "In his office that afternoon, and behind closed doors…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          6          "There were Three in All." Part 3 of 3. Pages 157-238. First line: "In his office that afternoon, and behind closed doors…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          7          "Thieves in the Night." Story I. By John T. McIntyre. 28 pages. First line: "The big Spanish con slipped silently through the night rain…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          8          "Thieves in the Night." Story I. By John T. McIntyre. 28 pages. First line: "The big Spanish con slipped silently through the night rain…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          9          "Thieves in the Night." Story I. By John T. McIntyre. 28 pages. First line: "The big Spanish con slipped silently through the night rain…” (Typescript)          Undated

38          10          "This is What Happened." Part I. By Kerry O'Neil. 78 pages. First line: "It was a rainy, dismal night, and past the hour for closing the office.” (Typescript)          Undated

38          11          "Three Christmas Eves.” By John T. McIntyre. 121 pages. First line: "It was early evening; and the snow had been falling all afternoon.” (Typescript)          Undated

38          12          "Three Christmas Eves.” By John T. McIntyre. 121 pages. First line: "It was early evening; and the snow had been falling all afternoon.” (Typescript)          Undated

38          13          "Three Christmas Eves.” By John T. McIntyre. 121 pages. First line: "It was early evening; and the snow had been falling all afternoon.” (Typescript)          Undated

39          1          "Three Christmas Eves.” By John T. McIntyre. 113 pages. First line: "It was early evening; and the snow had been falling all afternoon.” (Holograph/typescript)          Undated

39          2          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. [author not named.] Pages 112-214. First line: "There were a great many girls at the Refuge…” (Typescript)          Undated

39          3          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. [author not named.] Pages 112-214. First line: "There were a great many girls at the Refuge…” (Typescript)          Undated

39          4          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. [author not named.] Pages 112-214. First line: "There were a great many girls at the Refuge…” (Typescript)          Undated

39          5          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. (Part 2 of 3). Pages 138-267. First line: "With set lips, Troop bent over the form of the young director.” (Typescript)          Undated

39          6          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. (Part 2 of 3). Pages 138-267. First line: "With set lips, Troop bent over the form of the young director.” (Typescript)          Undated

39          7          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. (Part 2 of 3). Pages 138-267. First line: "With set lips, Troop bent over the form of the young director.” (Typescript)          Undated

39          8          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. (Part 3 of 3). Pages 268-401. First line: "Troop called at the clinic…” (Typescript)          Undated

39          9          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. (Part 3 of 3). Pages 268-401. First line: "Troop called at the clinic…” (Typescript)          Undated

39          10          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. (Part 3 of 3). Pages 268-401. First line: "Troop called at the clinic…” (Typescript)          Undated

40          1          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova. Pages 114-221. First line: "A few days later Anna's rent was due once more…” (Typescript)          Undated

40          2          "The Three Loves of Anna Maslova." Part 2 of 2. Pages 112-214. First line: "There were a great many girls at the Refuge where Anna was employed…” (Typescript)          Undated

40          3          “The Three Loves of Anna Maslova.” [Incomplete.] (Typescript)          Undated

40          4          "Tom Drake." [author not named.] Pages 1-212. First line: "I tell you, madam, he shall be sent off at once.” (Typescript)          Undated

40          5          "Tom Drake.” Pages 212-496. First line: "You will be welcome inside…” (Typescript)          Undated

40          6          "Tom Drake.” Pages 497-669. First line: "At precisely eleven o'clock on the morning of…” (Typescript)          Undated

40          7          "Tom Drake.” Pages 670-969. First line: "Two o'clock had just struck…” (Typescript)          Undated

40          8          "Tom Drake.” No author named. 8 pages. First line: "I, Old Gregory, Toms mother, with Tom, Rube and Winnie.” (Outline for prose work, Holograph notes)          Undated

40          9          "Traced.” By John T. McIntyre. 124 pages. First line: "The fine old Doric mansion, built by the rich John Gregory and for many years occupied by that well known patron of the arts…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          1          "Trouble at Greensleeves." Part 1 of ?  By Kerry O'Neil. 107 pages. First line: "Jerry Mooney sat in his inner office in the Bergman Tower…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          2          "Trouble Walks in on Mooney.” By Kerry O'Neil. 47 pages. First line: "The thousand eyes of the Bergman Tower were…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          3          "Twice Dead!” By Kerry O'Neil. 110 pages. First line: "The gray morning dripped its moisture into the streets.” (Typescript)          Undated

41          4          "Twice Dead!” By Kerry O'Neil. 110 pages. First line: "The gray morning dripped its moisture into the streets.” (Typescript)          Undated

41          5          "Two Pints for Hansel.” By Kelly O'Neil. 22 pages. First line: "Hulda was beautiful and blond; she had blue eyes…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          6          "Two Pints for Hansel.” By Kelly O'Neil. 22 pages. First line: "Hulda was beautiful and blond; she had blue eyes…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          7          "The Vanguard." Part 1 of 2. By John T. McIntyre. 138 pages. First line: "The United States flag flew over the Army and Navy Building…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          8          "The Vanguard." Part 2 of 2. Pages 139-286. First line: "Dick Shannon, with the words of President Peixoto well in mind…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          9          "The Vanished Chauffer." [published title; title on this manuscript: “Elizabeth's Chauffer".] Author not named. First line: "To begin with, the thing was an accident…” (Holograph)          Undated

41          10          "Water in the Wilderness.” No author named. 8 pages. "Outline of a proposed trilogy of novels, built against a background of early American transportation.” (Typescript)          Undated

41          11          "The Wedding Journey.” By John T. McIntyre. 197 pages. First line: "It was a late, fall afternoon, and the windows were up…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          12          "The Wedding Journey.” By John T. McIntyre. 197 pages. First line: "It was a late, fall afternoon, and the windows were up…” (Typescript)          Undated

41          13          "Wedding Night.” By Kerry O'Neil. 12 pages. First line: "Alice Graham was going to be married. That night.” (Typescript)          Undated

41          14          "Wedding Night.” By Kerry O'Neil. 12 pages. First line: "Alice Graham was going to be married. That night.” (Typescript)          Undated

42          1          While the Great Herds were Building." By John T. McIntyre. Part 1 of 4. 174 pages. Chapters I-XIV. First line: "Jim Fife had asked me to go on ahead of him to New Orleans and meet his son…” (Typescript)          Undated

42          2          "While the Great Herds were Building." Part 2 of 4. Pages 175-344. Chapters XV-XXVI. First line: "At the Hotel Europe, Terry and I sat down and he told me what had passed between himself and the jeweler…” (Typescript)          Undated

42          3          "While the Great Herds were Building." Part 3 of 4. Pages 345-504. Chapters XXVII-XXXVII. (other copy) Pages 345-519, chapters XXVII-XXXVIII. First line: "The Fife-Gainor Ranch was about midway between the Frio and the Nueces rivers.” (Typescript)          Undated

42          4          "While the Great Herds were Building." Part 4 of 4. Pages 520-681. Chapters XXXIX-L. First line: "The matter of the killing of Cajaco had caught the attention of the whole region there abouts.” (Typescript)          Undated

42          5          "Who Killed That Man?” By Kerry O'Neil. Part 1 of 2. 127 pages. First line: "As Jimmy Smith stepped down along the street he was amused at the prankish appearance of everything.” (Typescript)          Undated

42          6          "Who Killed That Man?” By Kerry O'Neil. Part 1 of 2. 127 pages. First line: "As Jimmy Smith stepped down along the street he was amused at the prankish appearance of everything.” (Typescript)          Undated

42          7          "Who Killed That Man?” By Kerry O'Neil. Part 2 of 2. By Kerry O'Neil. Pages 128-251. First line: "… to Wally's apartment. But she was careful not to show this interest to Duddy, …" (Typescript)          Undated

42          8          "Within the City": A Scenario of a Novel in 32 Chapters. By John T. McIntyre. 12 pages. First line (from synopsis of chapter 1, after a prefatory note and a list of characters): "Chapter 1: Shows how rollicking Tom Desmond was turned from his door one roystering, Blustering Christmas eve…” (Typescript)          Undated

42          9          "6 Pentagon Terrace: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: 'No. 6 Pentagon Terrace is a heavy old green stone house…” (Typescript)          Undated

42          10          "6 Pentagon Terrace: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: 'No. 6 Pentagon Terrace is a heavy old green stone house…” (Typescript)          Undated

42          11          Notebook with outlines for several works: "The Murder of Avenue A," "Working the Double Cross," "Happy Jack," "Riley and the Ten," "Service," "The Dragon Balcony," "The Bleeding Feet," and several unnamed works. (Holograph)          Undated

42          12          Miscellaneous notes, jottings, synopses, lists, etc.          Undated

 

Subseries 4.2: McIntyre Drama and Plays, Undated

 

43          1          "A Thief in the House.” Adapted by John McIntyre from the Hungarian of Ferencz Herczog. [3 Acts.] First line: "Thorn (disgusted): 'Whew!  Hot as a furnace!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          2          "A Thief in the House.” Author not named. [outline, notes.] 4 pages. First line: "Two men breaking in.” (Holograph)          Undated

43          3          "A Young Man's Fancy: A Fantastic Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Martin (Surprised): 'Ah, here you are, Mr. Pickering.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          4          "A Young Man's Fancy." [Act I, Scene I.] By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Martin: 'Oh, here you are, Mr. Pickering.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          5          "A Young Man's Fancy: A Fantastic Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. [Act I.] First line: "Martin (Surprised): 'Ah, here you are, Mr. Pickering.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          6          "A Young Man's Fancy.” By John T. McIntyre. [Acts I and II.] First line: "Pickering (At length, to the porter): 'I say; what is that cloth over the window?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          7          "A Young Man's Fancy." [Act II.] First line: "Miss Carter (Complainingly to Miss Halsey): 'Well, between us two, I'd rather go…'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          8          "A Young Man's Fancy." [Act II.] First line: "Scene: The Show Window at Adams and Crawford's store…” (Typescript)          Undated

43          9          "A Young Man's Fancy." [Act III.] First line: "Devine: 'I think it shows up pretty good, eh?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

43          10          "A Young Man's Fancy: A Proposed Comedy in Four Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. 24 pages. First line: "this is the background of the story--with Pickering in the foreground.” (Typescript)          Undated

43          11          "A Young Man's Fancy.” [Notes.] First line: "Pickering: 'I'm afraid I don't understand.'“ (Holograph)          Undated

43          12          "A Young Man's Fancy.” [Notes.] First line: "Pickering: 'I'm afraid I don't understand.'“ (Holograph)          Undated

44          1          "Anna Maslova: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Nurse: 'Do you want to see the doctor?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          2          "Anna Maslova: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Nurse: 'Do you want to see the doctor?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          3          "Anna Maslova: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Nurse: 'Do you want to see the doctor?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          4          "Arriet Makes a Call: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Denny: 'Hello!  I say, Noll. It's eleven o'clock.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          5          "Arriet Makes a Call: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Denny: 'Hello!  I say, Noll. It's eleven o'clock.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          6          "Arriet Makes a Call: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Denny: 'Hello!  I say, Noll. It's eleven o'clock.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          7          "Arriet Makes a Call: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Denny: 'Hello!  I say, Noll. It's eleven o'clock.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          8          "Material for 'Beaumarchais': A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Note: this first is a collection of some of the leading facts.” (Typescript)

Undated

44          9          "Big Fellah: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!  I always get lodgers that live like damned hogs!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

44          10          "Call the Police: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Homer Miles. First line: "Hicks (Smoothly): 'Pardon.'  (He lifts his hat).” (Typescript)          Undated

44          11          "Call the Police: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Homer Miles. First line: "Hicks (Smoothly): 'Pardon.'  (He lifts his hat).” (Typescript)          Undated

45          1          "Call the Police: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Homer Miles. First line: "Hicks (Smoothly): 'Pardon.'  (He lifts his hat).” (Typescript)          Undated

45          2          "Call the Police: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Homer Miles. First line: "Hicks (Smoothly): 'Pardon.'  (He lifts his hat).” (Typescript)          Undated

45          3          "Caught!!!  A Farce Melo-Drama in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Palmer. (With conviction): 'Mark my words. I feel sure something will happen!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

45          4          "Child's Play.” No author named. First line (from first page in folder). "Alladen has never heard of her for she is not of his world.” (Holograph; Treatment/notes)          Undated

45          5          "Confidence." [1 act.] By John T. McIntyre. 23 pages. First line: "Merchant: 'Got everything you want, Collins?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

45          6          "The Dragon Balcony: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The Devil Shop of Hoy Sun, in the old San Francisco Chinese quarter.” (Typescript)          Undated

45          7          "The Dragon Balcony: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The Devil Shop of Hoy Sun, in the old San Francisco Chinese quarter.” (Typescript)          Undated

45          8          "The Dragon Balcony: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The Devil Shop of Hoy Sun, in the old San Francisco Chinese quarter.” (Typescript)          Undated

45          9          "The Dragon Balcony: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The Devil Shop of Hoy Sun, in the old San Francisco Chinese quarter.” (Typescript)          Undated

46          1          "The Dragon Balcony: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The Devil Shop of Hoy Sun, in the old San Francisco Chinese quarter.” (Typescript)          Undated

46          2          "Elizabeth's Chauffer: An Automobile Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Palmer (Smoothing cloth): 'I understand very well, my dear, and I agree with you.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          3          "First Steps: Material for a modern satirical comedy.” By John T. McIntyre. 18 pages. First line (after 'Forward'): "When Washington Irving Ordway was forty he was stout, good-humored…” (Typescript)          Undated

46          4          "First Steps: Material for a modern satirical comedy.” By John T. McIntyre. 18 pages. First line (after 'Forward'): "When Washington Irving Ordway was forty he was stout, good-humored…” (Typescript)          Undated

46          5          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          6          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          7          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          8          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          9          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          10          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

46          11          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

47          1          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

47          2          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

47          3          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

47          4          "Front: A comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Jackson (chagrined): 'Oh, I beg your pardon!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

47          5          "Front.” Author not named. 23 non-consecutive pages. First line: "Elsa: 'But, Amy, you've spoken to him so often.'“ (Holograph)          Undated

47          6          "The Greater Danger: A Melodrama in Four Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene One: The library in the Fifth Avenue home of James Field, of Stuart, Field & Co.” (Typescript).

48          1          "His Sister's Honor: A Melodrama in Four Acts--And Seven Scenes.” By John T. McIntyre and Herman Milus. First line: "Screechie: 'Come 7.' (Snapping fingers).” (Typescript)          Undated

48          2          "In the Golden West: A Comedy-Drama in Four Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Fritz: 'Vell I guss I vill have to sweep me once more der dust out.'" (Typescript)          Undated

48          3          "Lacy, of Clairs: A Play in Four Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "A Musketeer: 'A bottle of wine, gentlemen, before prayers: it will help us to be more devout.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

48          4          "The Museum Murder: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Art room of the "Morning Post.” (Typescript)          Undated

48          5          "Prince Ferdy: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Francis Hill. First line: "Scene: Music room of Ferdy's apartment, facing Central Park."          Undated

48          6          "Refugees: a Play in Four Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Donetto's studio in a West Side loft.” (Typescript)          Undated

48          7          "Satyr: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Boggs (to the man servant who has gathered up the cards): 'Throw them into the scrap-basket.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

48          8          "Satyr: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Boggs (to the man servant who has gathered up the cards): 'Throw them into the scrap-basket.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

49          1          "Satyr: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Boggs (to the man servant who has gathered up the cards): 'Throw them into the scrap-basket.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

49          2          "Satyr: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Boggs (to the man servant who has gathered up the cards): 'Throw them into the scrap-basket.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

49          3          "The Scourge: A Play in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: At the particular portion of the Whitehaven waterfront where our action takes place…” (Typescript)          Undated

49          4          "Shanghai: A Drama of the Early Japanese Occupation." [Three Acts.] By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The shop of the apothecary, Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

49          5          "Shanghai: A Drama of the Early Japanese Occupation." [Three Acts.] By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The shop of the apothecary, Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

49          6          "Shanghai: A Drama of the Early Japanese Occupation." [Three Acts.] By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The shop of the apothecary, Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

49          7          "Shanghai: A Drama of the Early Japanese Occupation." [Three Acts.] By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The shop of the apothecary, Hoy Sun…” (Typescript)          Undated

49          8          "She Told the World: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The place is a handsomely appointed living room in a second-floor apartment.” (Typescript)          Undated

49          9          "She Told the World: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The place is a handsomely appointed living room in a second-floor apartment.” (Typescript)          Undated

49          10          "She Told the World: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The place is a handsomely appointed living room in a second-floor apartment.” (Typescript)          Undated

49          11          "She Told the World: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: The place is a handsomely appointed living room in a second-floor apartment.” (Typescript)          Undated

50          1          "Slag: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

50          2          "Slag: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

50          3          "Slag: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

50          4          "Stained Sails: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: At the particular portion of the Whitehaven waterfront where our action takes place…” (Typescript)          Undated

50          5          "Stained Sails: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: At the particular portion of the Whitehaven waterfront where our action takes place…” (Typescript)          Undated

50          6          "Stained Sails: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: At the particular portion of the Whitehaven waterfront where our action takes place…” (Typescript)          Undated

50          7          "St. Raphael, the Angel." [no author named.] 3 acts. First line: "The Joyce mansion stands in the Murray Hill section of Manhattan…” (Typescript)          Undated

50          8          "St. Raphael, the Angel. [no author named.] First line: "There was a beautiful portrait on the sitting room wall…” (Notes; Holograph)          Undated

50          9          "St. Raphael, the Angel: A Comedy of High Heaven and the Earth below.” By John T. McIntyre. [3 Acts.] First line "The Joyce Mansion stands in the Murray Hill section…” (Typescript/Holograph)          Undated

50          10          "St. Raphael, the Angel: A Comedy of High Heaven and the Earth Below.” By John T. McIntyre. [3 Acts, the 3rd is missing.] First line: "The Joyce Mansion stands in the Murray Hill section…” (Typescript)          Undated

50          11          "St. Raphael, The Angel: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Ann (Dictating): 'And, dear Jessica, do remember, we are all working for you…'“ (Typescript)          Undated

50          12          "St. Raphael, The Angel: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Ann (Dictating): 'And, dear Jessica, do remember, we are all working for you…'“ (Typescript)          Undated

50          13          "St. Raphael, The Angel: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Ann (Dictating): 'And, dear Jessica, do remember, we are all working for you…'“ (Typescript)          Undated

50          14          "St. Raphael, The Angel: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Ann (Dictating): 'And, dear Jessica, do remember, we are all working for you…'“ (Typescript)          Undated

51          1          "St. Raphael, the Angel: A Comedy of High Heaven and the Earth Below: Outline Story of a Play.” By John T. McIntyre. 10 pages. First line: "Jane Pierce was a young woman of almost thirty.” (Typescript) (3 copies)          Undated

51          2          "St. Raphael, the Angel." [outline.] No author named. First line: "The church of St. Raphael, the Angel, stood in a mid- town street.” (Holograph)          Undated

51          3          "The Stork." [no author named.] First line: "The place in Tenth Street.” (Holograph; notes, draft)          Undated

51          4          "Stung: A Comedy in One Act.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Griggs (Puts his head in at E door): 'Want to see me?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

51          5          "Stung: A Comedy in One Act.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Griggs (Puts his head in at E door): 'Want to see me?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

51          6          "Stung: A Comedy in One Act.” By John T. McIntyre. 20 pages. First line: "Griggs (Puts his head in at E door): 'Want to see me?'“ (Typescript)          Undated

51          7          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          8          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          9          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          10          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          11          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          12          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          13          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          14          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

51          15          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Two Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "Scene: The house of Johnson Barnes, some where on Long Island.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          1          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "The scene: library of Johnson Barnes. It is about 8:30 in the evening.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          2          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "The scene: library of Johnson Barnes. It is about 8:30 in the evening.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          3          "Sub-Selves: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Mitchell S. Buck. First line: "The scene: library of Johnson Barnes. It is about 8:30 in the evening.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          4          "That House in the Avenue: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "The clock begins to strike five.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          5          "That House in the Avenue: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Ann (dictating): 'And, dear Jessica, do remember…” (Typescript)          Undated

52          6          "That House in the Avenue: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Ann (dictating): 'And, dear Jessica, do remember…” (Typescript)          Undated

52          7          "That Night at Dolans': A Neighborhood Chronicle in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Dolan: "Don't leave the biscuits in too long, Jane.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          8          "That Night at Dolans': A Neighborhood Chronicle in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Dolan: "Don't leave the biscuits in too long, Jane.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          9          "That Night at Dolans': A Neighborhood Chronicle in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Dolan: "Don't leave the biscuits in too long, Jane.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          10          "That Night at Dolans': A Neighborhood Chronicle in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Dolan: "Don't leave the biscuits in too long, Jane.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          11          "That Night at Dolans': A Neighborhood Chronicle in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Dolan: "Don't leave the biscuits in too long, Jane.” (Typescript)          Undated

52          12          "That Night at Dolans': A Neighborhood Chronicle in three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. Dolan: "Don't leave the biscuits in too long, Jane.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          1          "They were Going Away: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Living-room in small apartment in the Bronx.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          2          "They were Going Away: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Living-room in small apartment in the Bronx.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          3          "They were Going Away: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Living-room in small apartment in the Bronx.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          4          "They were Going Away: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Living-room in small apartment in the Bronx.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          5          "They were Going Away: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Living-room in small apartment in the Bronx.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          6          "They'll Die This Day.” By John T. McIntyre. [6 episodes.] First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

53          7          "They'll Die This Day.” By John T. McIntyre. [6 episodes.] First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

53          8          "They'll Die This Day.” By John T. McIntyre. [6 episodes.] First line: "Mrs. Karsh (looking about): 'My God, what a place!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

53          9          "Thieves in the Night. [no author named.] 3 Acts. First line: "Thorn (disgusted): 'Whew!  Hot as a furnace!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

53          10          "Traced: A Play in Four Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: Art room of the "Morning Post.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          11          "Trava: A Comedy in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre and Francis Hill. First line: "Scene: Music room in Trava's apartment.” (Typescript)          Undated

53          12          "The Wedding Journey: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line (after "description of characters"): "Scene: The living room of a flat in upper New York City.” (Typescript)          Undated

54          1          "The Young O'Connor: a Romance of the Irish Hills." [4 Acts.] By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Mrs. O'Connor: 'There: That will do very well.'“ (Typescript)          Undated

54          2          "6 Pentagon Terrace: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: 'No. 6 Pentagon Terrace is a heavy old green stone house…” (Typescript)          Undated

54          3          "6 Pentagon Terrace: A Play in Three Acts.” By John T. McIntyre. First line: "Scene: 'No. 6 Pentagon Terrace is a heavy old green stone house…” (Typescript)          Undated

 

Subseries 4.3: Unidentified Plays, Undated

 

54          4          [Fragment.] No author named. 1 sheet. First line: "Young man: 'You shut up.'  (He swings at Bystander with cane).” (Typescript)          Undated

54          5          [Unidentified A.] No author named. First line: "Act One. The Joyce mansion stands in the Murray Hill section…” (Holograph)          Undated

54          6          [Unidentified A.] Act Three.] No author named. First line: "Ann: 'I don't know how I made such foolish mistakes.'“ (Holograph)          Undated

54          7          [Unidentified.] No author named. First line: "Story: Scene between apothecary and wife.” (Holograph)          Undated

54          8          "Act One: Sitting room at Halfrin's, bar girls.” (Holograph)          Undated

54          9          "Act One: The curtain ascends in darkness.” 5 pages. (Typescript)          Undated

54          10          "Aid from Europe was the first thought…” 28 pages. Concerns the American Revolution and French aid, M. Beaumarchais. Prose outline for a play. (Typescript)          Undated

54          11          "Tom: I don't remember it.” Pages from Acts 1 and 2, not in order. Characters include Tom, Geordie, Amanda, Sharsig, Baxter. (Typescript)          Undated



Subseries 4.4: McIntyre Photoplays, Animated Films, and Verse, Undated

 

55          1          "Checkmate!” By H.A. Roberts and John T. McIntyre. 22 pages. First line: "Scene 1: (Hall in office building). Morton Joyce appears…” (Typescript)          Undated

55          2          "Counted Out: A Motion Picture Scenario.” By John T. McIntyre. 56 pages. First line: "Ned Powers is chemical engineer…” (Typescript)          Undated

55          3          "Counted Out.” By John T. McIntyre and C.M. Stuart. 35 pages. First line: "A beautiful and unscrupulous woman…” (Typescript)          Undated

55          4          "Counted Out." [synopsis.] By John T. McIntyre. 4 pages. First line: "Cal Dawson, a Montana cowboy…” (Typescript)          Undated

55          5          "The Dragon Balcony: A Photoplay in Five Reels.” By John T. McIntyre. 28 pages. First line: "A noble Chinese girl, on her way to New York, receives a disturbing message.” (Typescript)          Undated

55          6          "The Golden Bullet.” By John T. McIntyre. 31 pages. First line: "George Mitchell, owner of the Cactus V Ranch…” (Typescript)          Undated

55          7          "The Show Window Lady: A Photoplay in Three Reels.” By John T. McIntyre. 11 pages. First line: "Scene 1: (A plainly furnished bedroom). Anna is seated on the edge of the bed…” (Typescript)          Undated

55          8          "The Show Window Lady: A Photoplay in One Reel and Twenty-three Scenes.” By John T. McIntyre. 6 pages. First line: "Anna, a very pretty girl, is out of employment.” (Typescript)          Undated

55          9          "Struck Down." [186 scenes.] By John T. McIntyre. 26 pages. First line:
"Scene 1: (Room, Margaret Whitney's). She is a very handsome woman…" (Typescript)          Undated


55          10          "Struck Down." [186 scenes.] By John T. McIntyre. 26 pages. First line:
"Scene 1: (Room, Margaret Whitney's). She is a very handsome woman…" (Typescript)          Undated

55          11          "Struck Down." [186 scenes.] By John T. McIntyre. 26 pages. First line:
"Scene 1: (Room, Margaret Whitney's). She is a very handsome woman…" (Typescript)          Undated

55          12          "The Texas Ranger: A Photoplay in Three Reels.” By John T. McIntyre and Charles M. Stuart. 24 pages. First line: "Frank Deering. Captain of the Texas Rangers, overhears a conversation in the "Longhorn" saloon.” (Typescript)          Undated

55          13          "Wright and Lefty: A Comic Drama Done in Pictures.” Author not named. 50 Strips. First line: "Remarks: Put in background with as few strokes as possible.” (Typescript)          Undated

55          14          "Wright and Lefty: A Comic Drama Done in Pictures.” Author not named. 50 Strips. First line: "Remarks: Put in background with as few strokes as possible.” (Typescript)          Undated

55          15          "A Prayer.” By John T. McIntyre. Published in: The Sight-Giver. Vol. VII, No. 2. Page 3. 18 lines. First line: "Christ Jesus!" (Typescript)          Undated

55          16          "The Gal With The Painted Gams.” By John T. McIntyre. 18 lines. First line: "This to the breeze of a summers day.” (Typescript) (11 copies)          Undated

 

Subseries 4.5: McIntyre Non-Fiction, Undated

 

56          1          "Christmas Books.” By John T. McIntyre. 3 pages. First line: "The time was when it was a fixed belief…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          2          "Corbett and Sullivan.” Author not named. 4 pages. (see "John L. Sullivan Appears.")  First line: "In the early 1890's, the hardy old warrior of the prize ring, John L. Sullivan…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          3          "Fist Fighters: Battles in the Ring from Jim Figg to Joe Louis.” Part 1 of 3. 118 pages. First line: "Boxing, if one considers it as a business and not as a sport…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          4          "Fist Fighters: Battles in the Ring from Jim Figg to Joe Louis.” Part 1 of 3. 118 pages. First line: "Boxing, if one considers it as a business and not as a sport…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          5          "Fist Fighters.” Part 2 of 3. Pages  119-231. First line: "Tommy Ryan, who fought for years…” (Typescript)          Undated
56          6          "Fist Fighters.” Part 2 of 3. Pages  119-231. First line: "Tommy Ryan, who fought for years…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          7          "Fist Fighters.” Part 3 of 3. Pages 232-340. First line: "After Tommy Ryan…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          8          "Fist Fighters.” Part 3 of 3. Pages 232-340. First line: "After Tommy Ryan…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          9          "John L. Sullivan Appears.” Author not named. 4 pages. (See "Corbett and Sullivan"). First line: "In the year 1880, championship battles…” (Typescript) (3 copies)          Undated

56          10          [Literature in Philadelphia.] Author not named. 7 pages. First line: "When what are some times called…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          11          "The Old Weekly Story Papers.” By John T. McIntyre and Wm. J. Benners. 37 pages. First line: "The trouble broke out some years ago…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          12          "The Old Weekly Story Papers.” By John T. McIntyre and Wm. J. Benners. 37 pages. First line: "The trouble broke out some years ago…” (Typescript)          Undated

56          13          "The Other Side of No Man's Land.” Author not named. 20 pages. First line: "With the growing sympathy for former…” (Title uncertain; the above title assigned from last line). (Typescript)          Undated

56          14          "Sub-Literature: A review of the old weekly story papers.” 39 pages. First line: "On the tenth of May in the year 1920,…” (Typescript) (3 copies)         Undated

56          15          "Within the Kremlin Walls.” Author not named. [Ziekursch?] 30 pages in two parts, plus draft. First line: "The world cannot escape war.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

56          16          "Within the Kremlin Walls." [?] Notes, clippings. (Holograph)          Undated

56          17          "A radical change is impending in the method…” 21 pages. (Typescript)          Undated

56          18          "… almost all they think or talk about…” Pages 12-15. (Typescript)          Undated

 

Subseries 4.6: McIntyre Unidentified Manuscripts, Undated 

 

Loose sheets, title-less, and otherwise unidentified manuscripts. Arranged by first line, where first page is present.

 

57          1          "Constable Galton had a bad reputation…” 24 pages. (Typescript)          Undated

57          2          "Drive down to Corpus Christi,' Jim Fife said to me…” (Holograph/typescript)          Undated

57          3          "Duddington Pell Chambers was brushing his hair…” 4 pages. (Holograph)          Undated

57          4          "Entrance to Madison Square Garden. Night of the bout…” 8 pages. (Typescript)          Undated

57          5          "The girl standing at the front of the pier…” (Manuscript of T. von Ziekursch?  Alaska, salmon, Captain Thralmar, etc.)  (Holograph)          Undated

57          6          "Halliday loosened the gun in the holster…” 13 pages. (Typescript)          Undated

57          7          "It was a rainy, dismal night…” 4 pages. (Holograph)          Undated

57          8          "It was Jonesy who showed Elsa…” 108 pages. (Typescript)          Undated

57          9          "It was just about midnight…” 6 pages. (Holograph)          Undated

57          10          "Jerry Mooney had a half dozen people to see that morning…” 31 pages. (Holograph)          Undated

57          11          "Jim Macy was driving…” Pages in disorder in three folders. (Holograph)          Undated

57          12          "Jim Macy was driving…” Pages in disorder in three folders. (Holograph)          Undated

57          13          "London!  A dark day during the…” (Manuscript and notes; Holograph)          Undated

58          1          "Montana Jones was smoking…” (Holograph)          Undated

58          2          "Some years ago there was a considerable stir made in the matter of Moses Brown…” (Fragile: sheets folded in half and disintegrated at the crease). (Holograph)          Undated

58          3          “Telephone began…” 1 page. (Holograph)          Undated

58          4          “Terry’ll have…” (Holograph)          Undated

58          5          "The wild gods howled, savage, triumphant.” 131 pages, complete. (Typescript)          Undated

58          6          "There was a bustle of activity in the lanes…” 28 pages, complete. (Typescript)          Undated

58          7          "This Sharsig was a nice fellah.” 7 pages, complete. (Typescript)          Undated


Sub-subseries 4.6.1: Manuscripts Arranged Alphabetically by Speculative Title, Undated

 

58          8          "Anna Maslova.” 4 pages of notes. (Holograph)          Undated

58          9          "Cast Out.” Various pages from page 128. Title found on envelope. (Typescript)          Undated

58          10          "Eagles in the Sun.” "6 Pentagon Terrance.” "Twice Dead.” (Miscellaneous pages include parts of these 3 titles). (Typescript)          Undated

58          11          "Green Ice.” (Title taken from envelope). Various pages from 39-146. (Typescript)          Undated

58          12          "Rolling Into The Sun.” Miscellaneous notes, material, found in folder reading "Material: Rolling Into The Sun” (Holograph)          Undated

58          13          "Tom Drake.” (Title taken from last sentence). Pages 970-997. (Typescript)          Undated

 

Sub-subseries 4.6.2: Complete Sections of Manuscripts Missing the First Section, Undated

 

59          1          "After leaving the Spring Garden Street house…” Pages 125-194. (Typescript)          Undated

59          2          "After leaving the Spring Garden Street house…” Pages 129-197. (Typescript)          Undated

59          3          "At the Hotel Europe, Terry and I sat down…” Pages 175-344. Part A (for
part B, see "The Fife-Gainor Ranch…")  (Typescript)          Undated

59          4          "Bud Hedges took off his wide-brimmed hat…” Pages 505-681. (Same last
line, similar characters to "The matter of killing of…" (below)). (Typescript)          Undated

59          5          "It was after dark on that same night…” Pages 100-200½. (Part A). (Typescript)          Undated

59          6          "Pat Greer, a little later…” Pages 201-309. (Part B). (Typescript)          Undated

59          7          "The Fife-Gainor ranch was about midway…” Pages 345-504. (Part B. For
Part A, see "At the Hotel Europe…" above). (Typescript)          Undated

59          8          "The matter of the killing of J.B. Hedges…” Pages 159-319. (Typescript)          Undated

59          9          "The old Theatre Francais…" Pages 107-222. (Typescript)          Undated

59          10          "… to Wally's apartment. But she was careful…” Pages 128-251. (Typescript)          Undated

60          1          "When Jerry returned to the hotel…” Pages 67-124. (Typescript)          Undated

60          2          "When Jerry returned to the hotel…” Pages 70-128. (Typescript)          Undated

60          3          "When Terry returned from the ministry…” Pages 126-251. (Typescript)          Undated

60          4          "When Terry returned from the ministry…” Pages 126-251. (Typescript)          Undated

60          5          "… wondered what it'd be like.” Pages 108-215. (Typescript)          Undated

 

Sub-subseries 4.6.3: Incomplete Manuscripts Missing First Page, Undated

 

60          6          "Big Georgie Lotts, at his gymnasium…” Pages 75-194. (Typescript)          Undated

60          7          "… Chubby. 'I'd better get to business.'“ Pages 11-24, 26-27. (Typescript)          Undated

60          8          "… considerable of a chance?” Page 24. (Typescript of an Ashton-Kirk story)          Undated

60          9          "… jolly woman like him.” 11 pages. (Holograph)          Undated

60          10          "… of. Wally was a stooge…” Page 103. (Typescript)          Undated

60          11          "San Antonio is about 150 miles from…” (Holograph)          Undated

60          12          "… telephone range at that moment…” (Typescript)          Undated

60          13          "The small explosions of light continued…” Pages 9-38. (Typescript)          Undated

60          14          "There was a row of a half dozen doors…” Pages 39-52. (Holograph)          Undated

60          15          "… with that gallant gloveman, Joe Choynski.” Pages 2-4. (Typescript)          Undated

 

Sub-subseries 4.6.4: Unidentified Notes and Outlines, Undated

 

61          1          "A young man and his sister live…” (Outline; Holograph)          Undated

61          2          "Gerald Nelson, a young American of means…” Outline for the Silent Brotherhood?  (Typescript)          Undated

61          3          "… he comes face to face with Joan.” (Holograph)          Undated

61          4          "Plot: an English man servant.” (Outline, notes. Holograph)          Undated

61          5          "Stephen Foster. The family. Settlement in Pittsburgh.” (Notes: for fiction or about dime novels?  Holograph)          Undated

61          6          "The church stands facing the square.” (Holograph)          Undated

61          7          "The Copnal Garden. The hat check girl.” (Holograph)          Undated

61          8          "The man and his wife and the trained dog.” (Outline; Holograph)          Undated

61          9          Unidentified notes          Undated

61          10          Unidentified notes          Undated

61          11          Unidentified notes          Undated

61          12          Unidentified miscellaneous manuscript material (Typescript and Holograph)          Undated

61          13          Unidentified miscellaneous manuscript material (Typescript and Holograph)          Undated

61          14          Unidentified miscellaneous manuscript material (Typescript and Holograph)          Undated

61          15          Unidentified miscellaneous manuscript material (Typescript and Holograph)          Undated

61          16          Unidentified miscellaneous manuscript material (Typescript and Holograph)          Undated

61          17          Unidentified miscellaneous manuscript material (Typescript and Holograph)          Undated

 

Subseries 4.7: Manuscripts By Known Authors Other Than McIntyre, 1932, undated

62          1          Dixon, R.G. "A Gift of Emeralds.” 17 pages. First line: "That Christmas eve was no night for anyone to be abroad…"          Undated

62          2          Dixon, R.G. “Death’s Hand.” [Illustrated by Leo Morey.] In: Complete Detective Novel Magazine. No. 50. pp. 8-101. First line: “‘What do you think of it, Manny?’ said Tom Burke to me.”          August 1932

62          3          Dixon, R.G. "Looking for Johnson.” Nine 'groups.'  First line: "I got off the train with a roll of expense money, and orders to find Johnson…” (Typescript)          Undated

62          4          Dixon, R.G. "Looking for Johnson.” Nine 'groups.'  First line: "I got off the train with a roll of expense money, and orders to find Johnson…” (Typescript)          Undated

62          5          Dixon, R.G. "Mooney Moves Around.” 98 pages. First line: "The gray morning dripped into the streets…” (Typescript)          Undated

62          6          Dixon, R.G. "Mooney Moves Around.” 98 pages. First line: "The gray morning dripped into the streets…” (Typescript)          Undated

62          7          Dixon, R.G.  "Murder on the Speedway.” 16 pages. First line: "Tom Burke had finished a cocaine smuggling case that day…” (Typescript)          Undated

62          8          Dixon, R.G. "Quick Work.” 18 pages. First line: "One afternoon, late in October, I was smoking a cigarette with Tom Burke…” (Typescript)          Undated

62          9          Dixon, R.G. "White Death.” 8 pages, incomplete. First line: "He was a short man, rather thick-set and about forty years of age.” (Typescript)          Undated

62          10          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Sea Hawks of the Revolution.” 5 pages. First line: "Contents: Chapter 1: In which old Clay Porterfield speaks his mind…” (Typescript. Outline. Rejection letter from Rinehart and Co. included)          Undated

62          11          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Sea-Hawks of the Revolution." Part 1 of 3. 118 pages. Chapters I-XVI. First line: "'I tell you, Ann,' stormed the old master of Porterfield House, 'he shall be sent off at once!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

63          1          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Sea-Hawks of the Revolution." Part 2 of 3. Pages 119-240. Chapters XVII-XXX. First line: "The gardens belonging to the commodore's mansion were illuminated by many lights…” (Typescript)          Undated

63          2          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Sea-Hawks of the Revolution." Part 2 of 3. Pages 119-240. Chapters XVII-XXX. First line: "The gardens belonging to the commodore's mansion were illuminated by many lights…” (Typescript)          Undated

63          3          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution: A Story of Tall Ships and Deep Water.” First line: "Chapter 1: In which old Clay Porterfield speaks his mind…” (Holograph, Typescript. Outline, notes, draft)          Undated

63          4          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution: A Story of Tall Ships and Deep Water." Part 1 of 3. 118 pages. First line: "'I tell you, Ann," stormed the old master of Porterfield House, 'he shall be sent off at once!'“ (Typescript)          Undated

63          5          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution: A Story of Tall Ships and Deep Water." Part 2 of 3. Pages 119-240. First line: "The gardens belonging to the commodore's mansion were illuminated by many lights…” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

63          6          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution: A Story of Tall Ships and Deep Water." Part 3 of 3. Pages 241-363. First line: "The wounded man was carried away and placed in the care of a doctor and nurses.” (Typescript) (3 copies)          Undated

63          7          Emmett, William Lawrence. "Young Sea Hawks of the Revolution: A Story of Tall Ships and Deep Water.”   First line: "Chapter 1: In which old Clay Porterfield speaks his mind…” (Holograph, Typescript. Outline, notes, draft)."Blackmail.” By Kerry O'Neil. 23 pages. First line: "The telephone buzzed and Jerry Mooney took it up.” (Typescript) (2 copies)          Undated

63          8          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  I. “The Adventure of the Pelican Club.” In: Brief Stories. pp. 59-64. First line: “The first time I ever saw Cravath was at Bernard’s . . .”          Undated

63          9          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”)  I. “The Adventure of the Pelican Club.” In: Brief Stories. pp. 59-64. First line: “The first time I ever saw Cravath was at Bernard’s . . .”          Undated

63          10          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” II. The Adventure of the Double Cross.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 98-102. First line: “Cravath lived in a pretty suburban place . . .”          Undated 

63          11          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” III. “The Adventure of Crosby’s June.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 92-98. First line: “I had not yet arisen when Charlie Paterson came in.”          Undated

63          12          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” IV. “The Adventure of The Beautiful Lady.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 110-116. First line: “When we left the cab stable . . .”          Undated

63          13          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” V. “The Adventure of the Hindoo Butler.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 107-112. First line: “I called at Cravath’s a few nights later . . .”          Undated 

63          14          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” VI. “The Adventure of the Swiss Professor.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 101-106. First line: “One day about four in the afternoon . . .”          Undated

63          15          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” VII. “The Adventure of the Lonely House.” (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 100-106. First line: “One evening not long after the affair of the Swiss professor . . .”          Undated

63          16          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” VIII. “The Adventure of the Merchant’s Trust.” [Illustrated.] (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 78-84. First line: “Cravath Stopped at my hotel about noon one day . . .”          Undated

63          17          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” IX. “The Adventure of La Sultana.” [Illustrated.] (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 102-108. First line: “It was by the merest chance that I saw Cravath that morning.”          Undated

63          18          Gates, MacBurney. “The Bronze Badge.” X. (Conclusion.)  “The Adventure of the French Restaurant.” [Illustrated.] (“A Series of ten swiftly moving novels, each complete in itself yet with a central thread . . .”) In: Brief Stories. pp. 99-106. First line: “Of course I was not to win a lady fair . . .”          Undated

63          19          Gates, MacBurney. "Kildare, of the Pony Express.” 213 pages. First line: "Of two pictures, here is the first.” (Typescript)          Undated

63          20          Kearney, George F. "Pappy and Katy: A One-Act Play.” "An episode in the love life of Benjamin Franklin.” 18 pages. First line: "Exterior of Franklin's print shop…” (Typescript)          Undated

63          21          Kearney, George F. "Tomorrow is important: A conversation piece in one scene.” Concerning Joseph Bonaparte (Napoleon's brother). 7 pages. First line: "The first floor parlor of the residence of Joseph Bonaparte.” (Typescript)          Undated

63          22          Miles, Homer. "Bridge is Important: An Observation.” 7 episodes. First line: "Scene: This is the house of the Dwights.” (Typescript)          Undated

64          1          Page, Ralph. “The Night Devil.” [Illustrated by Leo Morey.] In: The Wild West Stories and Complete Novel Magazine. pp. 8-71. First line: “Three riders drew quickly aside off the vague trail.”          Undated

64          2          Roesgen, J.H. "Foothold: A Novel of Youth.” ('Sample Pages') 44 pages. First line: "John Marsh was not by nature irritable…” (Typescript)          Undated

64          3          Stewart, Roger Gordon or T. Von Ziekursch. "The Lights of God.” 17 pages. First line: "In the core that fronted the post at Apwik House…” (3 copies, typed 3 different times; same text. One is "by T. von Ziekursch.” Under the title of another, in pen, is written "By Roger Gordon Stewart").          Undated

64          4          Stewart, Roger Gordon or T. Von Ziekursch. "Under the Wire.” Roger Gordon Stewart (one copy) or T. von Ziekursch (second copy). 34 pages. First line: "There was a bustle of activity in the lanes between the stables despite the early hour.” (Typescript. 2 copies written under 2 names. With the copy by von Ziekursch a rejection letter is included)          Undated

64          5          Thompson, C. Patrick. "High Society of Crookdom.” In: New York Herald Tribune Magazine. Pages 4-5, 24. (Tear sheets)          July 26, 1931

64          6          Von Reitzenstein, Rolf. "Espionage in the Department of Censure in England during the War.” First line: Immediately after the World War broke out…” (Holograph and Typescript)          Undated

64          7          Von Reitzenstein, Rolf. "Espionage in the Department of Censure in England during the War.” First line: Immediately after the World War broke out…” (Holograph and Typescript)          Undated

64          8          Von Reitzenstein, Rolf. "Espionage in the Department of Censure in England during the War.” First line: Immediately after the World War broke out…” (Holograph and Typescript)          Undated

64          9          Von Reitzenstein, Rolf. "Espionage in the Department of Censure in England during the War.” First line: Immediately after the World War broke out…” (Holograph and Typescript)          Undated

64          10          Wells, Richard Tasker. "The Aryan Comes Striding." Part 1 of 4. 157 pages. First line: "The Little Polish far was green with spring, and Anna Maslova…” (Typescript)          Undated

64          11          Wells, Richard Tasker. "The Aryan Comes Striding." Part 2 of 4. Pages 158-322. First line: "There were a great many girls at the Refuge…” (Typescript)          Undated

64          12          Wells, Richard Tasker. "The Aryan Comes Striding." Part 3 of 4. Pages 323-485. First line: "A half hour later, Anna Maslova sat in the car at the tower door…” (Typescript)          Undated

64          13          Wells, Richard Tasker. "The Aryan Comes Striding." Part 4 of 4. Pages 486-626. First line: "Troop's telephone, at the Flagan, rang next morning before he'd arisen.” (Typescript          Undated

64          14          Wells, Richard Tasker. “Murder at Pelham.” [Frontispiece by HLV Parkhurst.] In: Complete Detective Novel Magazine. No. 47. pp. 8-98. First line: “Jerry Mooney, of Collins and Mooney, Private Detectives, sat tipped back in his chair.”          May 1932

64          15          Wells, Richard Tasker. “Terror in the Night.” [Illustrated by Leo Morey.] In: Complete Detective Novel Magazine. No. 49. pp. 6-93. First line: “Jerry Mooney came into the office of Collins & Mooney with dragging thread.” (Final page has an advertisement for “Death’s Hand” by R.G. Dixon)          July 1932

 

Miscellaneous: material separated by format (flat box filing), post-processing additions, artifacts, etc.

 

65          1          Citypaper.net. “The Hard Life of John McIntyre: The Legendary Philly Novelist Nobody’s Head Of”          March 22, 2006

65          2          Broad Street Review. “The ‘Capital C’ Culture Syndrome”          April 17, 2006

65          3          City Paper (2 copies)          March 16, 2006

65          4          “Mooney’s in a Jam.” By Kerry O’Neil. [Illustrated by Robert W. Crowther.] In: The Philadelphia Inquirer, Gold Seal Novel Section. First line: “Mickey always said the music at Philadelphia’s The Algerian Moon was just dandy.”          October 15, 1944

65          5          “The Hand of Glory.” By John T. McIntyre.  [Illustrated by Sidney Riesenberg. In: The Philadelphia Record Sunday Magazine.  pp. 3-4, 18-19.  First line: “The clerks and patrons had already gone . . .”          May 9, 1915

65          6          “The Romeo and Juliet of McGarrigal Alley.” By John T. McIntyre. In: The Chap-Book. Vol. IX, No. 1, pp. 22-26. First line: “Oh we’re frinds to our frinds, an’ we’re foes to our foes.”          May 15, 1898

65          7          "Peril: Another Kaye Macy Adventure." By John McIntyre. In: MacFadden Weekly. Pages 16, 19. First line: "There was a quiet ring at the apartment bell."          November 3, 1934

65          8          "Roulette!" By John McIntyre. In: MacFadden Weekly. Pages 14-16. First line: "The Strains of music came up the magnificent old staircase…"          November 17, 1934

65          9          "Plunder: A Kaye Macy Adventure Story."  By John McIntyre. In: MacFadden Weekly. Pages 14, 16. First line: "The night was cold and the doorway gave Chubby…"  [See also in Published Short Stories].         October 27, 1934

65          10          Scrapbook of boxing clippings          Undated

65          11          Scrapbook of miscellaneous clippings          Undated

                    Artifact: McIntyre's Library Desk/Table          Undated

                    Framed drawing, of scene from a McIntyre historical novel?, on artists’ board. Not signed but note on back reads: “Artist / McIntyre / & Whites”??  Rec. June 2004. (45.5 x 72.5 cm within 54.5 x 81 cm.)          Undated