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Graduate Extern Program

Application Deadline: February 15, 2020

The Loretta C. Duckworth Scholars Studio (LCDSS) of Temple University Libraries, in collaboration with Temple Schools and Colleges, invites applications for the LCDSS Graduate  Extern Program for the next academic year.

The Graduate Extern Program offers full-time support to graduate students for two semesters, including a stipend, fees, benefits, and one tuition credit.

Students work 20 hours per week in the LCDSS. Half of their time is dedicated to their own research or creative project. The remainder of the time, they assist the LCDSS as needed. Externs meet monthly with the Faculty Fellows as a works-in-progress group.

Applicants should outline a research or creative project involving the use of computational methods. This might include e.g. approaches from the Digital Humanities, 3D printing, VR environments, or the use of games and gaming for teaching and research.

Eligibility

Applicants must be current graduate students in good standing of one of the following colleges:

  • College of Liberal Arts
  • Klein College of Media and Communication
  • Tyler School of Art and Architecture
  • Fox Business School
  • College of Engineering
  • College of Science and Technology

Applications

Applications will be reviewed by an interdisciplinary group of faculty and librarians. Award decisions are based on the promise of the project, its relevance to your own research/creative work, its methodology, scope, conceptual framework, and the ability of the LCDSS to address the project’s needs. For past and ongoing projects see the blogposts here: https://sites.temple.edu/tudsc// .

To apply please submit:

  • A project statement (4 pages double-spaced, plus a bibliography or illustrations, if needed) describing: (1) How will the project advance your dissertation or thesis? (2) What digital material do you want to work with, and where will it come from? (3) What digital tools do you imagine using?  (4) What past digital projects similar to yours are there?
  • A current C.V. that details relevant skills

Send application materials before the deadline to bingenheimer@temple.edu. Applicants may consult with the LCDSS in advance of applying. Please direct questions to:

Prof. Marcus Bingenheimer, LCDSS Academic Director (bingenheimer@temple.edu)

Past fellowship recipients

2018-2019

Alissa Elegant, MFA, Boyer School of Dance

Alissa is a dance artist who grew up in the shadow of Silicon Valley and is fascinated with technological innovation as a theme and as a tool. She is interested in the technological manipulation of images and how different technologies are unique forms that invite different possibilities of showing the dancing body.  She is also interested in exploring the possibilities of non-linear time that video allows. She integrates video into her live performances and also turns video of live performances into stand-alone pieces, seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=3&v=e7DL2GdhF_Y 

Vivien Wise, MFA in Fibers and Material Studies

Vivien is an MFA student in Fibers and Material Studies at the Tyler School of Art. She is drawn and connected to the process and materiality of the rag rug, the quilt as art object, and the community formed by a knitting circle. Through explorations of materiality and tactility, her work comments on the concept of shared spaces and connections. Vivien searches for connections between others and herself to find community in this way. She is primarily a quilter.Vivien’s project in the DSC is a combination of mapping, data, and traditional craft. She intends to create invented topographies that are based on a connection between land and body, relation to care, and connection to personal history.  Her work can be viewed at www.vivienwise.com

Bethany Farrell, PhD Art History

Bethany Farrell studies sixteenth-century Italian art, centering her dissertation on the painter Bronzino and the bureaucracy and transnational exchange of Duke Cosimo I’s court. Her interest in visualizing the complicated networks formed by the Florentine court through art led her to digital humanities. In 2015, she participated in a Getty-funded institute on digital art history at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Through the institute and her own initiative, she has experience with many different digital humanities techniques, including mapping (Carto, Neatline, and Map Warper), network analysis (Palladio), and web publishing (Omeka and Scalar). With networking and mapping visualizations tools as her main focus during her dissertation, Bethany is excited to be an extern at Temple’s Digital Scholarship Center for 2017-2018. Since beginning her graduate studies in the Department of Art History at Tyler School of Art in 2011, Bethany has received the Gretchen Worden Memorial Travel Stipend given by the Museum Council of Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley, a departmental Eakins Fund Travel Scholarship, and the Tyler School of Art Dean’s Art History Doctoral Research Grant as well as presenting her master’s thesis research at the Renaissance Society of America. Bethany was awarded the Temple University Graduate School Summer Research Grant in 2016 and was Temple University’s Rome Fellow in Spring 2017.

Gary Scales, PhD History

Gary Scales is a Ph.D. student in the Department of History. His research focuses on the cultural history and built environment of the twentieth-century United States. His recent work explores the role of gas stations in the development of economic, cultural, and social spaces in American suburbs between 1911 and 1990. He is currently examining the relationship between material culture and digital methods through a study of the cultural and historical importance of the payphone in urban America. As the inaugural Department of History Graduate Fellow in Digital History in 2016, his worked utilized GIS, digital modelling, text-mining, web development, and Python programming. He has served as a Research Assistant for digital projects at the University of New Mexico in 2015, and the DSC at Temple University in 2016 and 2017. He manages and develops the Department of History Wiki, and teaches undergraduate courses on American history and the history of global sport using a variety of digital tools. He has presented his work in the U.K., the United States, and Germany.

2017-2018

Bethany Farrell, PhD Art History

Bethany Farrell studies sixteenth-century Italian art, centering her dissertation on the painter Bronzino and the bureaucracy and transnational exchange of Duke Cosimo I’s court. Her interest in visualizing the complicated networks formed by the Florentine court through art led her to digital humanities. In 2015, she participated in a Getty-funded institute on digital art history at the Roy Rosenzweig Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Through the institute and her own initiative, she has experience with many different digital humanities techniques, including mapping (Carto, Neatline, and Map Warper), network analysis (Palladio), and web publishing (Omeka and Scalar). With networking and mapping visualizations tools as her main focus during her dissertation, Bethany is excited to be an extern at Temple’s Digital Scholarship Center for 2017-2018. Since beginning her graduate studies in the Department of Art History at Tyler School of Art in 2011, Bethany has received the Gretchen Worden Memorial Travel Stipend given by the Museum Council of Philadelphia and the Delaware Valley, a departmental Eakins Fund Travel Scholarship, and the Tyler School of Art Dean’s Art History Doctoral Research Grant as well as presenting her master’s thesis research at the Renaissance Society of America. Bethany was awarded the Temple University Graduate School Summer Research Grant in 2016 and was Temple University’s Rome Fellow in Spring 2017.

Luling Huang, PhD Media & Communication

Luling Huang is a Ph.D. student in Media & Communication. His research areas are in political discussion, group interaction process, as well as belief and attitude change. His past research focused on how identity is used and achieved in everyday social interaction on digital platforms. At the Digital Scholarship Center, he works on a project investigating how conversational structure influences attitude change in online political discussion. He has conducted his studies with conversation analysis, computer-mediated discourse analysis, and narrative analysis. He has quantitative research skills in multivariate technique for social sciences. At DSC, he is exploring new ways to quantify and analyze conversation analytic data. Luling holds an M.A. in Media Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and a B.A. in Television Directing & Editing from Communication University of China in Beijing. He has skills in digital video shooting and editing. His other ongoing projects include working on a mathematical model to predict polarization and oscillation in belief change, and investigating storytelling in YouTube’s comment sections.

Caroline Tynan, PhD Political Science

Caroline is a PhD candidate in the political science department interested in identity politics, security studies, foreign policy, and authoritarian regimes, with regional specialization in the Arab world.  Her dissertation compares the current Saudi-led intervention in Yemen with the proxy conflict that took place between Saudi Arabia and Egypt from 1962-67. Through examination of archival documents, regional news sources, social media, and semi-structured interviews, she uses discourse analysis to trace how the Saudi regime’s construction of external threats to the nation has changed over time since the Nasserist period. She participated in July 2017 in the Arab Council for the Social Sciences’ Beirut School on Critical Security Studies in the Arab world. She is also currently an associate fellow at the Center for Humanities at Temple.

James Kopaczewksi, PhD History

Jim is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History. A historian of the nineteenth-century United States, his research focuses on the predominant legal and political questions of the period. His dissertation explores federal governance of contraband camps and reservations during and after the Civil War. As the Allen F. Davis fellow in 2016-2017, Jim helped develop historic exhibitions and public programs. His interests lie in helping improve classroom access to historic data via digital exhibition platforms, such as Omega and Scalar.

2016-2017

Luling Huang, PhD Media & Communication

Luling Huang is a Ph.D. student in Media & Communication. His research areas are in political discussion, group interaction process, as well as belief and attitude change. His past research focused on how identity is used and achieved in everyday social interaction on digital platforms. At the Digital Scholarship Center, he works on a project investigating how conversational structure influences attitude change in online political discussion. He has conducted his studies with conversation analysis, computer-mediated discourse analysis, and narrative analysis. He has quantitative research skills in multivariate technique for social sciences. At DSC, he is exploring new ways to quantify and analyze conversation analytic data. Luling holds an M.A. in Media Studies from the University of Texas at Austin, and a B.A. in Television Directing & Editing from Communication University of China in Beijing. He has skills in digital video shooting and editing. His other ongoing projects include working on a mathematical model to predict polarization and oscillation in belief change, and investigating storytelling in YouTube’s comment sections.

Aja Binette, PhD Political Science

Aja Binette is a PhD candidate in Political Science at Temple University, defending her dissertation in the Fall of 2017. Her research focuses on the changing conceptions of global governance, particularly on issues surrounding climate change and environmental policy. Using network analysis, she looks at how the network structure of relationships among NGOs engaged with international climate change policy development has changed over the history of the UNFCCC. Shifts in network structure and participation are indicative of an increasingly diverse civil society movement, encompassing conversations on sustainability, mitigation, adaptation, capacity building, technology, and climate finance.

Michael Glass

Kaelin Jewell, PhD Art History

Kaelin Jewell is an art historian who specializes in the visual culture of the late antique and early medieval Mediterranean. She is interested in how digital tools, such as architectural visualizations and photogrammetry, can help to better understand past urban environments, many of which are no longer visible. In her dissertation, “Architectural Decorum and Aristocratic Power in Late Antiquity: The Gens Anicii,” Kaelin explores the architectural and artistic mechanics of power and display as employed by the aristocratic families of cities such as Rome, Ravenna, and Constantinople during the 4th through the late-6th centuries CE. It is through new and exciting digital tools and the support of Temple’s Digital Scholarship Center, that Kaelin will be able to conceptualize and visualize the lost monuments, urban topographies, and complex family histories of late antiquity. Currently, Kaelin is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Art History at the Tyler School of Art and holds an M.A. in Art History, a B.F.A. in Photography and a B.A. in Archaeology (all from the University of Louisville). She has participated in on-site seminars in Istanbul and Cappadocia in addition to conducting research for her dissertation in Italy and Croatia, generously funded by the International Center for Medieval Art.

Andrea Siotto, PhD History

Andrea Siotto is an Italian Ph.D. student at the History Department at Temple. He is interested in the technological development before and during the First World War. He holds a B.A. in Art History and a M.A. in History from the Università degli Studi Roma Tre in Rome, Italy, where he specialized in the History of the Italian Risorgimento. He is very interested in understanding how to integrate digital instruments into research and teaching in the humanities. Andrea has professional knowledge in 2D and 3D Graphic Art, enjoys programming in C++, C#, and Python and utilizing GIS software. At the Digital Scholarship Center he has also found a way to pursue his passion of electronics and of building things. Andrea loves living in Philadelphia with his beautiful wife and their two cats.